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More recent approaches to Landscape PowerPoint Presentation
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More recent approaches to Landscape

More recent approaches to Landscape

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More recent approaches to Landscape

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  1. More recent approaches to Landscape Cezanne: Well: millstone and cistern under trees, 1892

  2. Through the 19th century, the genre of Landscape painting eventually changed in the hierarchy of genres. It was no longer regarded as trivial or not as worthwhile as History Painting. Influenced by photography and with scientific discoveries about colour amongst other factors, painters felt able to experiment more than previously. Cezanne, Gardanne 1885-6

  3. The development of photography in the first half of 19th century increasingly influenced society and affected the way artists wanted to produce their works, and allowed for a change in perspective, composition and position of horizon. These changes in the way people viewed things eventually led toabstract art . Ansel Adams, Old Faithful Geyser, 1950

  4. Ansel Adams, Winter sunrise from Lone Pine, negative 1927; printed 1979.

  5. Sculpture by the Sea What is it? A contemporary annual outdoor sculpture exhibition, held at Bondi; Cottesloe (Perth); & Aarhus (Denmark.) Why are we considering it now? Because it involves artists dealing with landscape. Not all the works respond to landscape: some of them would be equally well exhibited in a gallery space, as they are not interacting with the landscape. Others, however, respond to the world about them. The postmodern frame is an useful choice of viewpoint to talk about many of these works.

  6. Using the postmodern frame, what can we say about the world of the artists? Sasha Reid & Dominique Sutton, Melt, 2011

  7. Heads up, Steve Croquett, 2010

  8. Greer Taylor, Cellular Memory 2011

  9. Interacting with landscape over time – Andy Goldsworthy (b.1956 UK.) Stone and snow arch, Dumfriesshire, 1986.

  10. For me looking, touching, material, place and form are all inseparable from the resulting work. It is difficult to say where one stops and another begins. Place is found by walking, direction determined by weather and season. I take the opportunity each day offers: if it is snowing, I work in snow, at leaf-fall it will be leaves; a blown over tree becomes a source of twigs and branches. Floating hole, Lougborough Leicestershire 1986

  11. Goldsworthy, Shapes cleared in snow-covered heather, 1986.

  12. Resources • 19th Century Landscape: Metropolitan Museum of Art: • http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/lafr/hd_lafr.htm • Sculpture by the Sea : • http://www.sculpturebythesea.com/Home.aspx • http://www.sculpturebythesea.com/SculptureByTheSea/media/Documents/Education/Bondi-2011-Education-Kit---Exhibiting-Artists--Profiles.pdf • Greer Taylor: http://www.greertaylor.net/ • Andy Goldsworthy: http://www.ucblueash.edu/artcomm/web/w2005_2006/maria_Goldsworthy/TEST/index.html http://www.goldsworthy.cc.gla.ac.uk/ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/800916.stm • Ansel Adams: http://www.anseladams.com/