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Menu Writing 101 Planning Menus for Traditional Enhanced Food Based Menu Plans PowerPoint Presentation
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Menu Writing 101 Planning Menus for Traditional Enhanced Food Based Menu Plans

Menu Writing 101 Planning Menus for Traditional Enhanced Food Based Menu Plans

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Menu Writing 101 Planning Menus for Traditional Enhanced Food Based Menu Plans

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    1. Menu Writing 101 Planning Menus for Traditional & Enhanced Food Based Menu Plans Items to bring for class: Room Signs Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals (updated Chapters 1 and 4 included in participants packets 3-hole punched and ready to insert in their binders at school) Food models for OvS section and school lunch trays Flipchart and markers Sticky notes Basic class suppliesItems to bring for class: Room Signs Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals (updated Chapters 1 and 4 included in participants packets 3-hole punched and ready to insert in their binders at school) Food models for OvS section and school lunch trays Flipchart and markers Sticky notes Basic class supplies

    2. Course Overview Basics Portion Sizes Offer Versus Serve Nutrition Standards Cycle Menus Standardized Recipes HO PowerPoint (white) HO - When I get back to school, I need to . (yellow) explain how it can be used. HO PowerPoint (white) HO - When I get back to school, I need to . (yellow) explain how it can be used.

    3. Why is Menu Planning Important? It influences almost every aspect of your food service operation. Purchasing Preparation Popularity HO Chapt. 1 & 4 of Menu Planner explain that this was first printed in 1998, then revised in 2008. The updates of Chapters 1 and 4 are included in their folder (these two chapters have most substantial changes and will be referred to during this course). We have these chapters 3-hole punched so they can put them in their binders back at school. Can link to the revised edition from our website (see next slide for web address). The revisions include an update to the 2005 DGAs. The new meal pattern requirements, yet to be finalized based on Reauthorization, will reflect the 2010 DGAs. Chapter 1, page 21 MyPyramid has been replaced with MyPlate. HO Lets Eat for the health of it. (white) Can talk briefly about the 2010 DGAs and how this might affect menu planning.HO Chapt. 1 & 4 of Menu Planner explain that this was first printed in 1998, then revised in 2008. The updates of Chapters 1 and 4 are included in their folder (these two chapters have most substantial changes and will be referred to during this course). We have these chapters 3-hole punched so they can put them in their binders back at school. Can link to the revised edition from our website (see next slide for web address). The revisions include an update to the 2005 DGAs. The new meal pattern requirements, yet to be finalized based on Reauthorization, will reflect the 2010 DGAs. Chapter 1, page 21 MyPyramid has been replaced with MyPlate. HO Lets Eat for the health of it. (white) Can talk briefly about the 2010 DGAs and how this might affect menu planning.

    4. The Menu Planning Process 10 Steps To Success USDA Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals Chapter 4, page 91 http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/Resources/menuplanner.html Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals Chapter 4 (page 91), can follow along on the 10 steps. Take time to point out the following in Chapter 4: Bottom of page 94 (last paragraph) is no longer correct. Have participants cross it out. Chart on page 95 shows how lower fat choices can make a big difference. Take time to discuss memo on new milk requirements. HO Water and Milk Requirements Memo (white) Page 111 talks about how to get calcium with low-fat or fat-free dairy. Page 113 says flavored milk is very acceptable in fat-free and low-fat versions may want to address that flavored milk might be required to be no-fat in the new meal pattern requirements.Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals Chapter 4 (page 91), can follow along on the 10 steps. Take time to point out the following in Chapter 4: Bottom of page 94 (last paragraph) is no longer correct. Have participants cross it out. Chart on page 95 shows how lower fat choices can make a big difference. Take time to discuss memo on new milk requirements. HO Water and Milk Requirements Memo (white) Page 111 talks about how to get calcium with low-fat or fat-free dairy. Page 113 says flavored milk is very acceptable in fat-free and low-fat versions may want to address that flavored milk might be required to be no-fat in the new meal pattern requirements.

    5. Schedule a Time to Plan Menus Collect Menu Resources. Plan menus well in advance Review Feedback Taste Test Pull together a variety menu resources Successful menus Recipe files Students Internet Plan menus preferably one month in advance. Anyone do a whole year? Review previous menus Use feedback on menu choices Taste test products and recipes with your target market: KIDS Look at inventories, current market, prices. Also use production records Student groups surveys, internet schools list menus on internetPlan menus preferably one month in advance. Anyone do a whole year? Review previous menus Use feedback on menu choices Taste test products and recipes with your target market: KIDS Look at inventories, current market, prices. Also use production records Student groups surveys, internet schools list menus on internet

    6. Think About Where You Are And Where You Want To Go Think about changes that you want to make: Review menus, products and preparation Are they working? Need Changes? What areas are OK? What areas need modifying? Re-examine your current system. Look at participation trends, results from most recent SMI and CA response submitted by school. What menu items are you offering today that wouldnt have been offered 5-10 years ago? With the trend to more slow meals, local produce/farm2school, etc., will you be changing your menus? Re-examine your current system. Look at participation trends, results from most recent SMI and CA response submitted by school. What menu items are you offering today that wouldnt have been offered 5-10 years ago? With the trend to more slow meals, local produce/farm2school, etc., will you be changing your menus?

    7. Determine a Time Period Plan menus by the week Plan a cycle menu that works for your operation Ask participants what their time period is week, month, etc. Is a monthly menu printed/distributed for students/posting on internet? Keep in mind some schools may not use a formal cycle menu. However, they use the same entre items over. Ask participants what their time period is week, month, etc. Is a monthly menu printed/distributed for students/posting on internet? Keep in mind some schools may not use a formal cycle menu. However, they use the same entre items over.

    8. Lets Talk Cycle Menus Advantages Better meals, time savings, improved cost control Variety Use experience Adjusting Seasonal Menus Examples of Cycle Menus If you see something - share it with co-workers. Time to network- Check papers, web sites, student input Does having to order commodity food items a year in advance affect your menu planning able to use cycle menuing more?Examples of Cycle Menus If you see something - share it with co-workers. Time to network- Check papers, web sites, student input Does having to order commodity food items a year in advance affect your menu planning able to use cycle menuing more?

    9. Focus on the age or grade groups you are serving HO Traditional and Enhanced Meal Pattern Requirements (Lunch in blue; Breakfast in yellow). Can also find Traditional and Enhanced in Chapter 2 of Menu Planning. HO Traditional and Enhanced Meal Pattern Requirements (Lunch in blue; Breakfast in yellow). Can also find Traditional and Enhanced in Chapter 2 of Menu Planning.

    10. Decide The Number Of Choices You Will Offer The number of choices you offer depends on your operation Offering choices allows you to add new foods without risking drops in participation Entre choices depend on your kitchen and schools needs. Talk about effect of choices on planning, preparation, staffing, serving line, student acceptance (both pros and cons).Entre choices depend on your kitchen and schools needs. Talk about effect of choices on planning, preparation, staffing, serving line, student acceptance (both pros and cons).

    11. Select The Entre For Each Days Breakfast And Lunch Set the stage for the rest of the menu Entrees are central focus of meal. Be careful, include entrees that are known/accepted by students or? Loss of participation Follow a plan for providing a variety of entrees (cycle) If you must repeat same entre during a 2- week period, try varying the accompaniments Do Not Repeat Breakfast and Lunch items on same day. Example Breakfast for lunch - dont serve same items that you served at breakfast. Entrees are central focus of meal. Be careful, include entrees that are known/accepted by students or? Loss of participation Follow a plan for providing a variety of entrees (cycle) If you must repeat same entre during a 2- week period, try varying the accompaniments Do Not Repeat Breakfast and Lunch items on same day. Example Breakfast for lunch - dont serve same items that you served at breakfast.

    12. Select the Other Menu Item or Items Pick items that compliment the entre Use variety of fruits, vegetables and grains Good place to introduce new foods Compliment - Remember color and texture. Fresh produce can be wonderful for adding color and textures!Compliment - Remember color and texture. Fresh produce can be wonderful for adding color and textures!

    13. Provide Variety of Fluid Milk Choices Must offer at least 2 of the following: fat-free milk low-fat (1%) milk fat-free or low-fat lactose reduced milk fat-free or low-fat lactose-free milk fat-free or low-fat buttermilk fat-free or low-fat acidified milk. The new USDA regulations regarding milk reflect the 2010 Dietary Guidelines that recommend persons over two years of age consume fat-free or low-fat (1%) fluid milk. - Refer back to memo on milk requirements. As of now plain or flavored low-fat and fat-free milk may be offered. Some schools have restrictions on amount of sugar in food item, per their Wellness Policy weighing out the benefits of the other nutrients (Vit D, Calcium, etc.) Breakdown of Milk Fat: Refer them to Menu Planner, Chapter 4, page 95 The new USDA regulations regarding milk reflect the 2010 Dietary Guidelines that recommend persons over two years of age consume fat-free or low-fat (1%) fluid milk. - Refer back to memo on milk requirements. As of now plain or flavored low-fat and fat-free milk may be offered. Some schools have restrictions on amount of sugar in food item, per their Wellness Policy weighing out the benefits of the other nutrients (Vit D, Calcium, etc.) Breakdown of Milk Fat: Refer them to Menu Planner, Chapter 4, page 95

    14. Make Sure You Are Meeting Nutrition Goals Are meals nutritionally balanced? Do meals have all required components? Do meals provide adequate calories and nutrients while reducing fat, sat fat, cholesterol and sodium? Do they set good examples for students? Do they encourage variety?Do meals provide adequate calories and nutrients while reducing fat, sat fat, cholesterol and sodium? Do they set good examples for students? Do they encourage variety?

    15. Nutrition Standards Eight Nutrient Standards RDAS All meals served under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs must strive to meet eight nutrient standards and the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines. All meals served under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs must strive to meet eight nutrient standards and the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines.

    16. The Key Elements Of Nutrient Standards Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Protein Calcium Iron Vitamin A Vitamin C When people eat animal and plant foods, they consume stored energy that they use to fuel the body processes. When they expend energy, they burn calories. Excess energy consumed over immediate energy needs is stored for later use. Refer participants to handouts of the various nutrient standards included in their folders: HO - Tips for Lowering Fat and Sat Fat in School Meals (Goldenrod) Thirty percent or less of total calories should come from fat. Fat is an energy nutrient. All fat has nine calories per gram. High-fat foods also take longer to digest in the stomach so they have higher satiety feel full longer. Ten percent or less of total calories Saturated fats are usually solid at room temperature. Examples are butter, shortening and grease that is left in a skillet after you have cooked fatty meats Protein is needed for growth and maintaining body tissues. HO Calcium and School Meals (white) Calcium is a major mineral in the human body. It is stored in the bones and released when the body needs it for normal functioning HO Iron and School Meals (pink) Iron is a trace mineral that has multiple functions in the human body. Its primary function is to carry oxygen in the red blood cells HO Vitamin A and School Meals (lilac) Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin and it is stored in the body tissues. Much of it is stored in the tissues of the eye, where it assists the eye in adapting to night vision HO - Vitamin C and School Meals (green) Vitamin C is necessary for healthy skin and connective tissues, and some think it has a protective effect against the common cold, although this has not been scientifically proven. When people eat animal and plant foods, they consume stored energy that they use to fuel the body processes. When they expend energy, they burn calories. Excess energy consumed over immediate energy needs is stored for later use. Refer participants to handouts of the various nutrient standards included in their folders: HO - Tips for Lowering Fat and Sat Fat in School Meals (Goldenrod) Thirty percent or less of total calories should come from fat. Fat is an energy nutrient. All fat has nine calories per gram. High-fat foods also take longer to digest in the stomach so they have higher satiety feel full longer. Ten percent or less of total calories Saturated fats are usually solid at room temperature. Examples are butter, shortening and grease that is left in a skillet after you have cooked fatty meats Protein is needed for growth and maintaining body tissues. HO Calcium and School Meals (white) Calcium is a major mineral in the human body. It is stored in the bones and released when the body needs it for normal functioning HO Iron and School Meals (pink) Iron is a trace mineral that has multiple functions in the human body. Its primary function is to carry oxygen in the red blood cells HO Vitamin A and School Meals (lilac) Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin and it is stored in the body tissues. Much of it is stored in the tissues of the eye, where it assists the eye in adapting to night vision HO - Vitamin C and School Meals (green) Vitamin C is necessary for healthy skin and connective tissues, and some think it has a protective effect against the common cold, although this has not been scientifically proven.

    17. Other Nutrients Reduce Sodium Increase Fiber Reduce Cholesterol The regulations also seek to reduce sodium and cholesterol and to increase fiber in school meals. HO Guide for Reducing Salt & Other Sodium Additives in School Meals (goldenrod) HO Increasing Dietary Fiber in School Meals (yellow) HO Whole Grains (blue) HO Webpages where these handouts can be found along with additional nutritional fact sheets from USDA (green) HO - SY 2011-2012 Processed Product Nutritional Fact Sheet showing WI processed commodities and their calories, fat grams, saturated fat grams, and sodium milligrams. (white) The regulations also seek to reduce sodium and cholesterol and to increase fiber in school meals. HO Guide for Reducing Salt & Other Sodium Additives in School Meals (goldenrod) HO Increasing Dietary Fiber in School Meals (yellow) HO Whole Grains (blue) HO Webpages where these handouts can be found along with additional nutritional fact sheets from USDA (green) HO - SY 2011-2012 Processed Product Nutritional Fact Sheet showing WI processed commodities and their calories, fat grams, saturated fat grams, and sodium milligrams. (white)

    18. SMI School Meals Initiative Reviewing two weeks of menus, production records, and supporting documentation for both breakfast and lunch to determine compliance with nutritional standards. More information will be forthcoming on this with the final rule regarding Nutrition Standards (which will include the new meal pattern requirements). Ask how many of them refer to the results of the nutrient analysis and the submitted CA when reviewing and planning menus.Ask how many of them refer to the results of the nutrient analysis and the submitted CA when reviewing and planning menus.

    19. Do meals have all required components? Most important thing to remember! IF you learn one thing this is it! CLASS ACTIVITY - Write a menu one week allow 30 minutes (have 5 groups and each group writes a days menu so you have five days; could do both lunch and breakfast) Have them write it on flipchart paper to post. Make sure that they include planned portion size of each menu item. As a group, have them evaluate if their menus meet daily and weekly requirements for components. Most important thing to remember! IF you learn one thing this is it! CLASS ACTIVITY - Write a menu one week allow 30 minutes (have 5 groups and each group writes a days menu so you have five days; could do both lunch and breakfast) Have them write it on flipchart paper to post. Make sure that they include planned portion size of each menu item. As a group, have them evaluate if their menus meet daily and weekly requirements for components.

    20. Evaluate What you Have Planned Class Exercise: Write a menu one week allow 15 minutes (have 5 groups and each group writes a days menu so you have five days; could do both lunch and breakfast) Have them write it on flipchart paper to post. Evaluate for nutritional value, appeal, cost. Do menus meet staffing and equipment needs? Class Exercise: Write a menu one week allow 15 minutes (have 5 groups and each group writes a days menu so you have five days; could do both lunch and breakfast) Have them write it on flipchart paper to post. Evaluate for nutritional value, appeal, cost. Do menus meet staffing and equipment needs?

    21. Review -10 Steps Schedule a time to plan menus. Collect Menu Resources Think about where you are and where you want to go Determine a time period Focus on the age or grade groups you serve

    22. 5. Decide the number of choices you will offer 6. Select the entre for each days breakfast and lunch 7. Select the other menu item or items 8. Provide fluid milk choices 9. Make sure you are meeting nutrition goals 10.Evaluate what you have planned

    23. Basic Menu Planning Principles Balance Variety Choices Contrast Color Appeal

    24. Balance Strive for balance Balance flavors in appealing ways Balance higher-fat foods with lower-fat ones Use a combination of mild and strong flavors. Dont serve too many in each meal. Use a variety of shapes and sizes. Example Fish sticks, carrot sticks, Oven Fries and a bread stick ( all long strips and basically same color!). Not as appealing - plate presentation is important. Use a combination of mild and strong flavors. Dont serve too many in each meal. Use a variety of shapes and sizes. Example Fish sticks, carrot sticks, Oven Fries and a bread stick ( all long strips and basically same color!). Not as appealing - plate presentation is important.

    25. Variety Emphasize variety. Include a wide variety of foods Vary the types of main courses Include different forms of food Include an occasional new item Avoid same form of food example pasta w/ meat sauce and meat ravioli. Vary entres from casserole, sandwiches, and maybe a salad entre. Instead of chicken nuggets and mini corn dogs. Vary the way you prepare food. Raw and cooked vegetables. Avoid same form of food example pasta w/ meat sauce and meat ravioli. Vary entres from casserole, sandwiches, and maybe a salad entre. Instead of chicken nuggets and mini corn dogs. Vary the way you prepare food. Raw and cooked vegetables.

    26. Choices Offer Choices. Decide on number of choices Offer choices within as many components as you can Include food combinations If you offer choices Make sure your staff knows what a reimbursable meal is. If you offer choices Make sure your staff knows what a reimbursable meal is.

    27. Contrast Add contrast. Think about texture, taste and appearance Avoid having too much of the same Use a pleasing combination of different sizes and shapes Use crisp foods with soft foods example carrot sticks with macaroni and cheese Serve lighter foods with a heavy entre example: hearty casserole should be served with a light vegetable or fruit such as tossed salad or fruit cup. Use crisp foods with soft foods example carrot sticks with macaroni and cheese Serve lighter foods with a heavy entre example: hearty casserole should be served with a light vegetable or fruit such as tossed salad or fruit cup.

    28. Color Think about color. Avoid using too many foods of the same color Remember that vegetables and fruits are great for color Use combination of colorful and bland foods Dont forget spices Turkey, cauliflower, applesauce, bread and white milk. What is wrong with this? Parsley, paprika and cinnamon are good color additives. Turkey, cauliflower, applesauce, bread and white milk. What is wrong with this? Parsley, paprika and cinnamon are good color additives.

    29. Appeal Eye appeal Presentation Plan the way you place items on tray Does it look good? Plate presentation counts. TIME TO CRITIQUE MENU AND MAKE CHANGES 20 MINUTESDoes it look good? Plate presentation counts. TIME TO CRITIQUE MENU AND MAKE CHANGES 20 MINUTES

    30. Marketing Descriptive Menus Promotions Special Menu Days Have participants share examples of what they have done. Have participants share examples of what they have done.

    31. Menu Back Nutrition Education Messages Activities Notes Use the back of the menu to post Nutritional Messages, Activities and notes to parents HO -Dairy Council Handout in participants folder, Drink Milk could make a good menu back. Also, Dietary Guidelines for 2010 and MyPlate coloring sheet. Use the back of the menu to post Nutritional Messages, Activities and notes to parents HO -Dairy Council Handout in participants folder, Drink Milk could make a good menu back. Also, Dietary Guidelines for 2010 and MyPlate coloring sheet.

    32. Planned Portion Sizes

    33. Breakfast Grades K-12 Two servings of Meat/Meat Alternate OR two servings of Grains/Breads OR one serving of each Cup Juice/Fruit/Vegetable Milk 8 oz fluid milk as beverage OR on cereal OR both All info found in Menu Planner Chapter 2 Handouts- MEAL PATTERN Remind participants that these meal patterns will probably only be in effect for the 2011-2012 school year! All info found in Menu Planner Chapter 2 Handouts- MEAL PATTERN Remind participants that these meal patterns will probably only be in effect for the 2011-2012 school year!

    34. Lunch Traditional Grades K-3 1 oz Meat/Meat Alternate Cup Vegetables/Fruits 8 oz fluid milk as a beverage 8 servings per week (min 1 per day) Grains Breads Grades 4-12 2 oz Meat/Meat Alternate Cup Vegetables/Fruits 8 oz fluid milk as a beverage 8 servings per week (min 1 per day) Grains Breads

    35. Enhanced Grades K-6 2 oz Meat/Meat Alternate cup Vegetables/Fruit Plus an additional cup per week 8 oz fluid milk as a beverage 12 servings per week (min 1 per day) Grades 7-12 2 oz Meat/Meat Alternate 1 cup Vegetables/Fruit 8 oz fluid milk as a beverage 15 servings per week (min 1 per day)

    36. Offer Versus Serve What is OVS? Goals of OVS

    37. What is OVS? Offer versus Serve is a concept that applies to menu planning and to the determination of reimbursable school meals.

    38. OVS allows students to decline some of the food offered in a school lunch or school breakfast and is applicable to all menu planning approaches.

    39. Goals of OVS To reduce food waste in the school meals program To permit students choices to select the foods they prefer

    40. General OVS Requirements Choice is strictly the students decision. Students must take FULL servings to count toward a reimbursable meal Students may decline any item Use serving utensils. = Portion control and determine portion sizes. Use popcorn and mashed potatoes to show why f/v are portioned by cup increments (volume) and not weight (difference in 4 oz)Use serving utensils. = Portion control and determine portion sizes. Use popcorn and mashed potatoes to show why f/v are portioned by cup increments (volume) and not weight (difference in 4 oz)

    41. Specific OVS Requirements For Lunch The minimum serving sizes of 5 food items from the 4 food components must be offered. Grades 9-12 must be 3 of 5 Grades K-8 choice of 3 of 5 or 4 of 5

    42. Specific OVS Requirements For Breakfast The minimum serving sizes of 4 food items from the 3 or 4 food components must be offered OVS is optional at all grade levels If implemented, each student may refuse one item

    43. Consistency Counts The same number of food items The same number of choices within the food items Try to offer the same number of items and choices each day. Variations could cause confusion in the line. Try to offer the same number of items and choices each day. Variations could cause confusion in the line.

    44. To Achieve OVS Goals Of Less Food Waste Keep accurate production records Use forecasting to plan food quantities Use Cycle menus Production records - very important Tell you all the info you need to know. Production records - very important Tell you all the info you need to know.

    45. Teaching Students Concerns: Number of Items to select Portion Sizes Pricing Strategies: Encourage a complete meal Use posters, table tents, signs at Point of Service Portion control utensils or pre-portioned servings Hands on Demonstrations Enlist teachers help Daily Friendly reminders Good time to do a quiz on offer vs serve Use food models on lunch trays and/or flip charts to make examples for quiz.Good time to do a quiz on offer vs serve Use food models on lunch trays and/or flip charts to make examples for quiz.

    46. Standardized Recipes The information to be included on a standardized recipe form includes: Yield and contribution to meal pattern All ingredients Correct measures, weights, and/or pack size. ?Preparation procedures. A standardized recipe is one that has been: tried, adapted, and re-tried several times and found to produce the same good results and yield every time when the exact procedures are used with the same type of equipment and with the same quantity and quality of ingredients. A written standardized recipe is needed for any menu item that contains more than one ingredient. A standardized recipe is one that has been: tried, adapted, and re-tried several times and found to produce the same good results and yield every time when the exact procedures are used with the same type of equipment and with the same quantity and quality of ingredients. A written standardized recipe is needed for any menu item that contains more than one ingredient.

    47. References USDAs Food Buying Guide http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/foodbuyingguide.html USDAs A Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/Resources/menuplanner.html Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes http://www.nfsmi.org/documentlibraryfiles/PDF/20090506091901.pdf Remind participants that they can download replacement pages for the changes to the FBG and they can also download the revised Menu Planner. The first two are found on USDA websites. Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes is found on the National Food Service Management Institute website.Remind participants that they can download replacement pages for the changes to the FBG and they can also download the revised Menu Planner. The first two are found on USDA websites. Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes is found on the National Food Service Management Institute website.

    48. Questions?