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Ane D. Deister Co-Chair, Interim National Drought Council Associate Vice President Metropolitan Water District of Southe

Testimony at the Oversight Hearing on Water Supply - Environment and Public Works Committee, Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and Water November 14, 2001. Ane D. Deister Co-Chair, Interim National Drought Council Associate Vice President Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.

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Ane D. Deister Co-Chair, Interim National Drought Council Associate Vice President Metropolitan Water District of Southe

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  1. Testimony at the Oversight Hearing on Water Supply -Environment and Public Works Committee, Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and WaterNovember 14, 2001 Ane D. Deister Co-Chair, Interim National Drought Council Associate Vice President Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

  2. Attachment Water Availability by state Water Quality regulation impacts

  3. COST Regulation Treatment Technology Relationship between Regulations and Technology

  4. Consumer Driven Risk-Based Quality of Life Sensitive Subpops Acute Disease Chronic Disease From Health Driven to Consumer Driven: Historical Water Quality Emphasis Trace Organics Microbials Inorganics Organics Microbials Aesthetics Early 2000 Early 1900s 1990s 1960s 1970-1980s 2010

  5. Water Availability Issues for Bureau States • Drought conditions in western Texas • Extreme drought in Trans-Pecos climate division in Texas and in southeastern New Mexico • Recent locally heavy rains in northeastern Oklahoma an improvement to drought conditions

  6. Water Availability Issues for Bureau States (cont.) • Drought designation expanded for parts of the Northwest and northern Rockies • Wildfire potential still above normal for all of California and normal for Nevada

  7. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States • Alabama -- Decline of groundwater levels by 100 feet due to pumping • Alaska -- Permafrost decreases access to groundwater • Arkansas -- Decline of groundwater levels by 60 to 300 feet due to pumping • Connecticut -- Surface water cannot meet demands and SDWA requirements

  8. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Delaware -- Decline of groundwater levels by as much as 150 feet • Florida -- Decline of groundwater levels by as much as 150 due to pumping, and coastal area salt water intrusion • Georgia -- Surface and groundwater supplies not readily available near large cities, and coastal area salt water intrusion

  9. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Hawaii -- Water resources susceptible to prolonged droughts • Illinois -- Decline of groundwater levels by more than 850 feet in northeastern state due to pumping, and surface water inadequate during drought in southern two-thirds of state • Indiana -- Decline of groundwater levels by 20 feet due to Ag pumping

  10. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Iowa -- Groundwater not available in southern part of state, surface water deficiencies during drought, and Missouri River changes have lowered levels in wetlands and lakes • Kentucky -- Some areas with inadequate groundwater, and surface water inadequate during drought

  11. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Louisiana -- Decline of groundwater by as much as 430 feet in southern, and central state and several rivers have low flows restricting surface water availability • Maine -- Existing and potential surface and groundwater sources not sufficient for southern state

  12. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Maryland -- Decline of groundwater levels by as much as 85 feet in south state • Massachusetts -- Groundwater withdrawals for public water supply may lower levels in eastern state • Michigan -- Groundwater inadequate in northern state during droughts

  13. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Minnesota -- Irrigation and domestic users competing for groundwater • Mississippi -- Decline in groundwater levels along Gulf coast, northeastern, and western state due to pumping • Missouri -- Decline in groundwater levels by several hundred feet in southwestern state due to pumping

  14. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • New Hampshire -- Inefficient distribution system can cause water supply to not meet treatment standards and result in shortages • New Jersey -- Surface water supply to northern state only adequate when precipitation > average, and parts of state aquifers not fully used due to environmental/institutional constraints

  15. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • New York -- Decline of groundwater by 18 feet and decreases in stream flow by 90% in parts of Long Island, and droughts can cause inadequate water supply in New York City • North Carolina -- Approaching surface water supply limits in the Piedmont area, and coastal plain aquifers declining and experiencing saltwater intrusion

  16. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Ohio -- No issues identified • Pennsylvania -- No issues identified • Rhode Island -- Water supply systems cannot meet demands during droughts • South Carolina -- Scarce groundwater in Piedmont areas with reliance on variable surface water, and declining groundwater in southern state from Ag pumping

  17. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • Tennessee -- Subject to surface water shortages in eastern and central state during droughts • Vermont -- No issues identified • Virginia -- Water supplies not sufficient for future demands in southeastern state, and decline in groundwater up to 200 feet in some areas

  18. Water Availability Issues for Non-Bureau States (cont.) • West Virginia -- Surface water shortages in southern state during drought • Wisconsin -- Decline in groundwater up to and exceeding 100 feet in eastern and southeastern state due to pumping

  19. Example -- Successful Regional Overall Resource Strategy (cont.)(Metropolitan Water District)

  20. John Muir “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.”

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