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Using Differentiated Instruction to Implement Connecticut Standards (CCSS): PowerPoint Presentation
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Using Differentiated Instruction to Implement Connecticut Standards (CCSS):

Using Differentiated Instruction to Implement Connecticut Standards (CCSS):

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Using Differentiated Instruction to Implement Connecticut Standards (CCSS):

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  1. Using Differentiated Instruction to Implement Connecticut Standards (CCSS): Day 1

  2. Introductions and Greetings • Names • Places • Roles • A reason for attending today’s session • A question they have about DI

  3. One Agenda: • Introductions • What is the philosophy that supports the differentiated classroom? • How can we come to know our students in a short period of time? • How do we know if we have rigorous curriculum? • How can I preassess my students? • Once I figure out the critical learning difference I will address, how can I best use flexible small groups in my room? • What are some sample strategies—related to choice and tiering—that I can use in my classroom to address critical student learning differences?

  4. Assumptions About These Two Days • The training will provide 3 opportunities to design differentiated lesson plans • Teachers will need the full support of leadership/administrators to implement in the classroom • Lead trainers will be available at each RESC and SERC • There are multiple ways to introduce DI at each level, i.e., elementary, middle and high school and should be tied to the strategic plan • Multiple examples will be provided, ELA/Literacy and Math CCSS, as well as connections to other content areas

  5. Assumptions About These Two Days • That you have come as a team to learn more about DI • That you have varying levels of expertise about DI • That you all have some familiarity with the term and its practice in the classroom • That you have brought a curriculum unit with which you can reflect upon and practice with • A rich list of resources accompanies this module, as well as an FAQ sheet

  6. SRBI and Differentiated Instruction

  7. You are here… Tier III 1-5% Tier II 5-15% Continuum of Support Tier 1 80-90% All Students in School

  8. What’s your current understanding? Select 1 of 3 prompts to help formalize your thinking…

  9. Pick a column Write or think silently Be ready to share Sharing Write a definition of differentiation that you believe clarifies its key intent, elements and principles---in other words—a definition that could clarify thinking in your school or district Explain to a new teacher what differentiation is in terms of what he/she would be doing in the classroom—and why. The definition should help the new teacher develop an image of differentiation in action Develop a metaphor, analogy or visual symbol that you think represents and clarifies what’s important to understand about differentiation

  10. Myths About Differentiated Instruction • Individualized instruction a la special education • Chaotic • Homogenous grouping all the time • Tailoring the same suit of clothes • Expecting more of advanced learners and less of struggling learners • New • It’s formulaic; there are a finite number of “correct” strategies that always work

  11. Differentiated Instruction Is… A proactive decision-making process that considers critical student learning differences and the curriculum. Differentiated instruction decisions are made by teachers and are based on: (1) formative assessment data, (2) research-based instructional strategies, and (3) a positive learning environment.

  12. THE DI DECISION-MAKING PROCESS • CONTENT • INTRODUCTION • INITIAL INSTRUCTION • PREASSESSMENT • DIAGNOSIS What are the CRITICAL DIFFERENCES in my students? How can I MODIFY one or more of the 10 curriculum components to address difference? CHOICE or ALTERNATIVES Adjusting the Breadth TIERING Adjusting the Depth MANAGEMENT OF FLEXIBLE, SMALL GROUPS POST ASSESSMENT: Impact of DI

  13. THE DI DECISION-MAKING PROCESS What are some possible CRITICAL DIFFERENCES in my students? • Interests • Learning styles • Expression styles • Questions • Readiness to Learn • Culture • Race • Gender • Language • Motivation

  14. THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS How can I MODIFY one or more of the 10 curriculum components to address the ONE targeted learning difference? ASSESSMENTS of Students and Their Content Knowledge INRODUCTION LEARNING Activities TEACHNG Strategies EXTENSIONS GROUPING RESOURCES PRODUCTS CONTENT TIME GRPG INTRO TCHG TIME. EXT PRO LRNG RES Content Process Product Environment

  15. Content Assessment Grouping Introduction Teaching Strategies Curriculum Components: Advance Organizer Learning Activities Resources Extensions Time Products LRNG RES GRPG EXT INTRO TIME. TCHG PRO Tomlinson, C.A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzulli, J. S., Purcell, J. H., Leppien, J. H., Burns, D. E., Strickland, C. A., Imbeau, M. B., (2009). The Parallel Curriculum Model. (2nd ed.).Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

  16. TALK IN 2s & 3s This SQUARES with my beliefs THREE POINTS I want to remember Here’s what’s going AROUND in my head Judy Rex-Scottsdale AZ

  17. The Common Sense of Differentiation • Crafting an environment that actively supports each student in the hard work of learning • Having absolute clarity about the learning destination • Persistently knowing where students are in relation to the destination all along the way • Adjusting teaching and learning to make sure each student arrives at the destination (and, when possible, moves beyond it.

  18. A Few BIG Ideas to Think on….

  19. The Predictive Power of Mindset • GROWTH • Success comes from effort • With hard work, most students can do most things • Teachers can override student profiles • A key role of the teacher is to set high goals, provide high support, ensure student focus—to find the thing that makes school work for a student FIXED • Success comes from being smart • Genetics, environment determine what we can do • Some kids are smart—some are not • Teachers cannot override student profiles

  20. People Can Change their MINDSET QUESTION Is a flexible mindset a precursor to attending effectively to student differences? OR Is it a goal for professional development related to differentiation? What are the implications of your answer?

  21. 3 Minute Pause Note your • Connections • Insights • Questions • Misgivings About this stage of the workshop. Work first alone—then with one or two colleagues

  22. The Common Sense of Differentiation • Crafting an environment that actively supports each student in the hard work of learning • Having absolute clarity about the learning destination • Persistently knowing where students are in relation to the destination all along the way • Adjusting teaching and learning to make sure each student arrives at the destination (and, when possible, moves beyond it.

  23. MATCHING • The Curriculum • Content • Process • Product Onemost critical student learning difference • Interest • Learning Profile • Readiness/Prior knowledge • Motivation • Gender • Culture • Language

  24. Students “I remember Fred Morhart.  He was my history teacher at West Potomac High School in Alexandria, Virginia.   He let us revise papers until they were perfect.  In doing that,  he let us know that he would stick with us until we were perfect.”  Brooks Preuher,  urban planner,  Alexandria,  Virginia  “I remember Miss McDonald, my second grade teacher at Oyster River Elementary School in Durham, New Hampshire.  I came out of that classroom with a sense of well-being that I never lost.”   Shaula Levinson,  homemaker,  Portsmouth,  New Hampshire

  25. On Knowing Students… How do teachers learn to care deeply about students? How do students know when teachers care?

  26. What Are EASY Ways to Connect With Students? • LISTEN • Talk at the door • Complete interest assessments and use the data • Use small group instruction • Seek and use student input • Invite examples, analogies, experiences • Use student-led discussions • Share your own stories • Seek varied perspectives • Go to student events • Spend time in the café during lunch or study halls • Keep student data cards • Attend extra-curricular activities • Build some of the curriculum on student interests and culture

  27. Bao When he first began school, Bao stated that he was “scared to make friends” because his English-language skills were limited. He didn’t want to raise his hand and felt frustrated in class. Bao received English as a Second Language (ESL) services for fourth and fifth grade, which helped him to learn English faster and “feel the same as other kids.” In ESL classes, Bao felt that he “sort of” was able to show his true abilities. “I knew to read and write to show how smart I was. I learned English faster than the other kids and got them mostly all right so I sort of knew I was smart then.”

  28. Molly Molly is now unstoppable. Her history teacher noticed an on-off switch in her. “Molly turned into my best student. It didn’t start out that way. Molly herself knows what her teacher is talking about. McNair knew she was smart and didn’t think she had to prove it by getting good grades. Then one day she realized that colleges would need evidence of her abilities and it occurred to her that “intelligence is worth nothing unless you can work with it. A hard working person is going to go father than a smart person if the smart person doesn’t choose to work.” The As in honors classes rolled in after that…

  29. Sadness in My HeartVena Romero, 11 years old My thoughts flow vigorously Through my mind As I see the tears fall endlessly Because we, the younger generation, are blind. Blinded by the white world and what it brings, We forget about our world And all our sacred native things. We have held our tradition For so very long. The elders are praying, wishing, That it will live on. We’re forgetting about them And our future. Slowly, we’re losing them And our culture We can’t see How we’re hurting ourselves By losing our identity, Our culture, tradition, heritage, and our ourselves. We are not Native Americans Without our world. We are just dark-skinned Americans In a white world. Callahan, C.M. & McIntire, J. A. (1994). Identifying outstanding talent in American Indian and Alaskan Native students.Washington, D.C.: Office of Educational Research and Improvement.

  30. Daquanna Due in most part to her disability, Daquanna was an extremely shy and quiet child. When she talked, she almost whispered. Her teachers described her as highly sensitive, insightful, and caring and noted that Daquanna was always concerned about her own achievement level and frequently sought approval when she tried new things. Furthermore, she rarely took risks until she was familiar with all aspects of a learning experience. She worked best with constant individual support. She frequently asked, “Is this right?” and she constantly questioned herself and her skills. She typically avoided academics, but enjoyed the creative activities that were available in her school. She especially liked drawing, art, and music. The one class each week where she worked independently and was willing to take risks was art. Her artistic skill became especially apparent when she received a first-place ribbon in a district-wide competition for a sculpture of herself which included details that reflected her cultural heritage and ethnicity.

  31. Techniques to Learn About Differences Among Students • Prior Knowledge • Learning Styles • Interests • Expression Styles • Language Proficiency

  32. 21st Century Learning Profiles • Prior knowledge in a content area • Interests • Learning styles • Goals • Content area preferences • Other?

  33. Elementary Math

  34. Elementary Math

  35. Middle School LabERIN

  36. Six Plus One Trait Rubric http://www.nwrel.org/assessment/pdfRubrics/6plus1traits.PDF

  37. Optional Learning Profile Components • Interests • Learning Style • Preferences • Goals • Other?

  38. Interests

  39. EXIT or ENTRANCE Cardsused to gather information on student readiness levels, interests, and/or learning profiles

  40. EXIT or ENTRANCE Cards 3 Identify three “ah-ha’s” from today’s lesson about plate tectonics 2 Pose two new questions you have about plate movement 1 Name one thing you will remember forever

  41. LAS Links for ELL Students

  42. MATCHING • The Curriculum • Content • Process • Intro • Grouping • Teaching Strategies • Learning Activities • Resources • Product Onemost critical student learning difference • Interest • Learning Profile • Readiness/Prior knowledge • Motivation

  43. Movie TimeIn this high school class: • What is this teacher’s mindset? • To what extent does this teacher connect with her students? On what evidence do you base your conclusion? • How might connecting with students contribute to achievement? What is the evidence for your conclusion?

  44. The Common Sense of Differentiation • Crafting an environment that actively supports each student in the hard work of learning • Having absolute clarity about the learning destination • Persistently knowing where students are in relation to the destination all along the way • Adjusting teaching and learning to make sure each student arrives at the destination (and, when possible, moves beyond it.

  45. What is RIGOROUS curriculum? • Should curriculum be rigorous for all students? • What might be some attributes of rigorous curriculum? • How do we know that it is rigorous enough to feed every mind appropriately?

  46. Multiple Intelligence Assignment • Meal/banquet picture

  47. What is Rigorous Curriculum? http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2618&q=322592