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Copy the following onto Portfolio p42 Why the South Seceded

Copy the following onto Portfolio p42 Why the South Seceded

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Copy the following onto Portfolio p42 Why the South Seceded

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  1. Copy the following onto Portfolio p42Why the South Seceded 15.4Class Notes

  2. Lesson 15.4b: Lincoln’s Election and Southern Secession Today we will explain why the Southern states seceded, as well as the Union’s response to secession.

  3. Vocabulary • secede – withdraw or resign from a political or religious association • response– an answer or reply, either in words or in action • diminished – reduced in size or importance

  4. Check for Understanding • What are we going to do today? • What response is unacceptable from a student in Mr. Bowman’s class? • What is something that might cause your respect for an adult to diminish?

  5. What does it mean to secede? To secede is to withdraw, as the South did, from the Union.

  6. What We Already Learned The Democratic Party split in 1860 over disagreements over slavery and popular sovereignty.

  7. What We Already Learned Lincoln defeated three (3) other candidates to win the election of 1860.

  8. What We Already Learned Many Southerners had warned that Lincoln’s election would lead to secession of the Southern states.

  9. Why did the South secede? • There were many factors beyond slavery that led to the secession of the South. • Differences in culture • Differences in Economy • Differences in Political Philosophy • Diminished Influence • Over-estimation of the South’s Importance • Lincoln’s Election

  10. Differences in Culture aristocratic and stratifiedin theSOUTHvs.democratic and fluidin theNORTH

  11. Differences in Economy Slave labor in the Southvs.free labor in the North

  12. Differences in Economy Agrarian Southvs.industrial North

  13. Differences in Political Philosophy Compact theoryvs.permanent union

  14. Diminished Political and Economic Influence The growing population & wealth of the North made the South feel less important than it once had. North South North South

  15. Overestimation of the South's Economic Importance Belief that the North’s economy could not survive without Southern cotton.

  16. Lincoln'selection Viewed by Southerners as a threat to slavery

  17. Southern StatesSecede • Secessionists argued that since the states had voluntarily joined the Union, they had the right to leave it. • This was the compact theory of government that had been supported by Southerners for generations.

  18. Southern States Secede • On December 20, 1860, South Carolina became the first state to secede. • Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, andFloridafollowed within six (6) weeks.

  19. The Confederate States of America Formed • February 1861 – Jefferson Davis elected president • The Confederate Constitution supported states’ rights and protected slavery in the Confederacy. • How would the Union government respond?

  20. Jefferson DavisAbraham Lincoln

  21. Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

  22. Who was Jefferson Davis? Jefferson Davis was the first President of the Confederate States of America.

  23. 23. How did white Southerners view Lincoln’s election as president?

  24. 23. How did white Southerners view Lincoln’s election as president? They viewed it with laughter, since they had just seceded. They saw it as a as a threat to slavery and to their way of life. To them, it was an example of popular sovereignty. They saw it as a crooked election, with thousands of phony votes cast.

  25. 24. How did the Southern states react to the election of President Lincoln?

  26. 24. How did the Southern states react to the election of President Lincoln? They beginning impeachment proceedings immediately. They threatened to withhold their tariff duties until he resigned. They seceded from the Union. They refused to send their representatives to Congress that year.

  27. 25. How did Southerners justify secession?

  28. 25. How did Southerners justify secession? They had not voted for Lincoln, so they did not recognize him as president. Since the states had voluntarily joined the Union, they also had the right to leave the Union. Lincoln's election had been illegal, so they didn't have to accept the result. Lincoln had announced his plans to abolish slavery, so they had a right to secede in defense of their culture. The Crittenden Compromise had included a secession clause, which they now were fulfilling.

  29. TheUnion Respondsto Secession • Buchanan argued against secession: the federal government was sovereign, secession threatened majority rule. • Southerners complained that Northerners were antislavery bullies. • Northerners accused Southerners of ignoring the rules of democracy.

  30. Efforts to Compromise Fail The Crittenden Plan: • re-establish Missouri Compromise line • permit slavery in the territories until statehood • other protections of slavery and the slave trade John J. Crittenden

  31. Efforts to Compromise Fail Political leaders in both the North and the South worked on the Crittenden plan in the hope that it would keep the Union together, but it failed to pass in Congress.

  32. Lincoln’s Inauguration Lincoln assured the South that he had no intention of abolishing slavery, but spoke forcefully against secession.

  33. “We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battle-field and patriot grave, to every living heart and hearthstone, all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

  34. As President, Lincoln wanted no invasion, but would not abandon government forts in the South.

  35. These forts, including Fort SumterinSouth Carolina, would soon need to be resupplied.

  36. Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

  37. 26. What message did President Lincoln try to give to the Southern states in in his inaugural address?

  38. 26. What message did President Lincoln try to give to the Southern states in in his inaugural address? Argument that the compact theory did not support secession Assurances to the South that he would not abolish slavery Strongly statement against secession Threats to use military force against the South if it did not return to the Union at once A promise never to keep slavery out of the territories