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November 12–16, 2008 PowerPoint Presentation
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November 12–16, 2008

November 12–16, 2008

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November 12–16, 2008

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  1. ShakeOut After-Action ReportKen Hudnut; United States Geological SurveyLucy Jones,Dale Cox, Sue Perry, Mark Benthien, John Bwarie, Margaret Vinci, Monica Buchanan, Kate Long, Sohini Sinha, Larry Collins November 12–16, 2008 Los Angeles County Operational Area After-Action Conference 18 December 2008

  2. Review of ShakeOut Initial Goals • Participation of at least 5 million people in the ShakeOut Drill • School, Business, and Community Organization recruitment effortswill have several million people participate • Everyone is encouraged to “spread the word” to promote peopleparticipating in the ShakeOut! • Shift the culture in southern California about earthquakes • We must all take greater responsibility for readiness • We all need to talk about earthquakes and preparedness more often • Significant increase in earthquake readiness at all levels • Also, after Chino Hills M 5.4 29 July 2008) • recognized need to emphasize • Drop, Cover and Hold On

  3. ShakeOut Goal: 5 million participants • As of 12/3… • Total: 5.47 million • Imperial: 44,407 • Kern: 107,734 • Los Angeles: 2.7 million • Orange: 896,669 • Riverside: 590,677 • San Bernardino: 501,677 • San Diego: 468,878 • Ventura: 83,472 • Other: 59,369

  4. International Earthquake Conference Sessions on megacities’ earthquake issues, earthquake engineering, lifelines EMI & City of LA; LA IEC Sponsors Erdal Safak, Bogazici Univ. (Turkey) Dirk Kempthorne, DOI Taipei in Chi-Chi 1999

  5. Get Ready Rally @ LA Live! Theo Alexopoulos, Pasadena Art Center Preparedness Now and K. Hudnut, USGS M. Vinci, K. Long, M. Buchanan of the ShakeOut Steering Committee Steve Sellers, OES

  6. ShakeOut - After-Action ‘wrap-up’ ‘Everyone’ is requesting annual ShakeOut sequels … … but how can this be done? Not Golden Guardian… Not USGS Multi-Hazards… Will require major funding… … at least one proposal and 5 year strategic planning effort for annual earthquake public education campaigns is in the works by Kate Long, OES

  7. ShakeOut - What Worked? • Began with a request of “what can we do for you?” • Broad-based stakeholder interview process at the outset & ongoing • Based on Best Available Science and Interdisciplinary Input • Incorporated decades worth of National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program research results into a single scientifically realistic Big One on the San Andreas fault; was not “too scary” - scale was actionable • Everyone in Southern California - from schoolchildren and the public to emergency managers and first responders - all know that this is the type of earthquake we need to be ready for; so we had a receptive audience • Multi-hazards and recognition of the breadth of problems • Not focused narrowly • Recognized importance of secondary effects • - Fire-following-earthquake • - Water distribution system disruption

  8. ShakeOut - Top 3 After-Action Issues • Need to keep the ball rolling • We need to do drills annually, building on success each time • Cultural shift to “preparedness becomes cool” • Study issues limiting and also allowing participation • Feedback suggests that top-level engagement either facilitated organization-wide participation or, in other cases, prevented it • How to ensure top-level buy-in and how to lower fear of down-side risk? • Resolve technical Issues • Geographic Information System (GIS) - exchange of information • - COM - Common Operating Maps (Digital Maps throughout EOC’s) • - US National Grid (geospatial interoperability) • - Large numbers of hard copy maps to the field

  9. ShakeOut - Top 3 After-Action Issues • Need to keep the ball rolling • We need to do drills annually, building on success each time • Cultural shift to “preparedness becomes cool” • Study issues limiting and also allowing participation • Feedback suggests that top-level engagement either facilitated organization-wide participation or, in other cases, prevented it • How to ensure top-level buy-in and how to lower fear of down-side risk? • Resolve technical Issues • Geographic Information System (GIS) - exchange of information • - COM - Common Operating Maps (Digital Maps throughout EOC’s) • - US National Grid (geospatial interoperability) • - Large numbers of hard copy maps to the field

  10. ShakeOut - Top 3 After-Action Issues • Need to keep the ball rolling • We need to do drills annually, building on success each time • Cultural shift to “preparedness becomes cool” • Study issues limiting and also allowing participation • Feedback suggests that top-level engagement either facilitated organization-wide participation or, in other cases, prevented it • How to ensure top-level buy-in and how to lower fear of down-side risk? • Resolve technical Issues • Geographic Information System (GIS) - exchange of information • - COM - Common Operating Maps (Digital Maps throughout EOC’s) • - US National Grid (geospatial interoperability) • - Large numbers of hard copy maps to the field

  11. Geospatial Interoperability Mark Bassett, OES at the REOC COM display - EOC digital maps - what about hard copies to field? U. S. National Grid; GPS - GIS - training program is available

  12. ShakeOut - Top 3 After-Action Issues • Need to keep the ball rolling • We need to do drills annually, building on success each time • Cultural shift to “preparedness becomes cool” • Study issues limiting and also allowing participation • Feedback suggests that top-level engagement either facilitated organization-wide participation or, in other cases, prevented it • How to ensure top-level buy-in and how to lower fear of down-side risk? • Resolve technical Issues • Geographic Information System (GIS) - exchange of information • - COM - Common Operating Maps (Digital Maps throughout EOC’s) • - US National Grid (geospatial interoperability) • - Large numbers of hard copy maps to the field

  13. What Next? • Need to keep the ball rolling • Evolve to annual event • Continue interaction with utilities and first responders • Fire-following-earthquake experts’ panel • Follow-up engineering actions on lifeline utilities and buildings • Keep working on the many identified gaps • Data and techniques could be improved for future scenarios • Media, graphics, websites still in development • Technical issues - identified and corrected, room for improvement • Continue with scientific research • SoSAFE paleoseismic research on past earthquakes • SCEC CME simulations of ground motions in great earthquakes • Improve earthquake monitoring systems; Eq. Early Warning • Implement ShakeCast, CISN Display, ENS (text, e-mail) • Scenarios for other disasters, continue multi-hazards approach

  14. "This is the best single effort in emergency preparedness in my nearly 20 years in the business. The Golden Guardian / Great Shake Out project did more to prepare our cities than all previous efforts combined for many years past. I have never had so much participation and interest in disaster preparedness. And it continues!” - Los Angeles County Emergency Manager

  15. Ken Hudnut, USGS hudnut@usgs.gov http://www.shakeout.org/

  16. Backup Slides

  17. Participant Types • Schools: 3.98 million (1589 registrants) • Colleges: 564,000 (121 registrants) • Businesses: 342,000 (2531 registrants) • Government: 289,600 (593 registrants) • Faith and Community organizations: 142,000 (1161 reg.) • Medical: 107,000 (280 registrants) • Individuals/Families: 57,600 (19,200 registrants)

  18. Registration By Date

  19. Web Statistics Nov. 7: 15,000 Nov. 13: 93,000