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Shifting Sand: Integrating Problem-Based Learning and Technology in Education

Shifting Sand: Integrating Problem-Based Learning and Technology in Education

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Shifting Sand: Integrating Problem-Based Learning and Technology in Education

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  1. Shifting Sand: Integrating Problem-Based Learning and Technology in Education George Watsonghw@udel.edu with contributions from Deborah Allen, Barbara DuchSusan Groh, Valerie Hans, and Hal White Institute for TransformingUndergraduate Education University of Delaware Asia-Pacific Conference on EducationNational Institute of Education, Nanyang Technogical UniversitySingapore, June 3, 2003www.udel.edu/pbl/nie-2003

  2. Delaware… Dela where?

  3. 2003 The Way It Was... 1973 graphing calculators, laptops, gigabytes and gigahertz, ubiquitous computing Computation

  4. 2003 The Way It Was... 1973 e-mail, voice-mail, chatrooms, FAX, pagers, cell phones,text messaging, instant messaging, wireless connectivity Communication

  5. 2003 The Way It Was... 1973 Online Information: web catalogs, networked databases, Britannica Online, online newspapers, course websites, CMS Collections

  6. Education and the Cs of Technology: • Computation and Calculation • Communication and Collaboration • Collections and Connections

  7. An important question: Given the amazing advances in technology and the dramatic change in the first-year experience, Can we afford to continue teaching the way we were taught?

  8. What I know best I have taught… …the individuals learning the most in the teacher-centered classrooms are the teachers there. They have reserved for themselves the very conditions that promote learning: actively seeking new information, integrating it with what is known, organizing it in a meaningful way, and explaining it to others. Page 35, Huba and Freed, Learner-Centered Assessment on College Campuses: Shifting the Focus from Teaching to Learning, 2000

  9. Characteristics Neededin College Graduates High level of communication skills Ability to define problems, gather and evaluate information, develop solutions Team skills -- ability to work with others Ability to use all of the above to address problems in a complex real-world setting Quality Assurance in Undergraduate Education (1994) Wingspread Conference,ECS, Boulder, CO.

  10. Recommendations from theCarnegie Foundation Make research-based learning the standard. Build inquiry-based learning throughout the four years. Link communication skills and course work. Use information technology effectively. Cultivate a sense of community. Boyer Commission Report

  11. John Dewey… “True learning is based on discovery guided by mentoring rather than the transmission of knowledge.”

  12. What is Problem-Based Learning? PBL is an learning approach that challenges students to “learn to learn,” working cooperatively in groups to seek solutions to real world problems. PBL prepares students to think critically and analytically, and to find and use appropriate learning resources.

  13. “The principal idea behind PBL is that the starting point for learning should be a problem, a query, or a puzzle that the learner wishes to solve.” Boud (1985)

  14. What are the CommonFeatures of PBL? Learning is initiated by a problem. Problems are based on complex, real-world situations. All information needed to solve problem is not initially given. Students identify, find, and use appropriate resources. Students work in permanent groups.

  15. PBL: The Process Students are presented with a problem. They organize ideas and previous knowledge. Students pose questions, defining what they know and do not know. Assign responsibility for questions, discuss resources. Reconvene, explore newly learned information, refine questions.

  16. The Problem-Based Learning Cycle Assessment (when desired) Overview Problem, Project, or Assignment Mini-lecture (as needed) Group Discussion Whole Class Discussion Preparation of Group “Product” Research Group Discussion

  17. The principal idea behind PBL is? • PBL challenges students to learn to learn. • Learning is initiated by a problem. • Student-centered work in permanent groups.

  18. “The principal idea behind PBL is that the starting point for learning should be a problem, a query, or a puzzle that the learner wishes to solve.” Boud (1985)

  19. The principal idea behind PBL is? A. PBL challenges students to learn to learn. B. Learning is initiated by a problem. C. Student-centered work in permanent groups. Think/ pair/ share

  20. IntegratingInformation Technologyand PBL

  21. Active Learning Objectives Courses should: • Be student-centered and encourage students to “learn to learn.” • Provide opportunities to think critically and to analyze and solve problems. • Assist students in developing skills in gathering and evaluating information. • Provide experience working cooperatively in teams and small groups. • Help students acquire versatile and effective communication skills. • Offer a variety of learning experiences. • Apply technology effectively where it will enhance learning.

  22. Information Technology Objectives Students should: • engage in electronic collaboration. • use and create structured electronic documents. • do technology-enhanced presentations. • use appropriate electronic tools for research and evaluation. • use spreadsheets and databases to manage information. • use electronic tools for analyzing quantitative and qualitative data. • identify major legal, ethical, and security issues in information technology. • have a working knowledge of IT platforms. Adapted from Technology Across the Curriculum, George Mason U.

  23. Overlap of Active-Learning Objectives and Instructional Technology Objectives

  24. Overlap of Active-Learning Objectives and Instructional Technology Objectives

  25. Overlap of Active-Learning Objectives and Instructional Technology Objectives

  26. www.physics.udel.edu/~watson

  27. Organizingthe Course Organizingthe Course Utilizing Online Resources

  28. Organizing the Course Web Sites and Web Pages Syllabus Syllabus Groups Student Reports and Projects

  29. Organizing the Syllabus Syllabus Introduction to PBL Group facilitation and support Forms for assessment

  30. Introduction to PBL

  31. Group facilitation and support

  32. Forms for assessment

  33. Examples of supporting information that can be linked from an online syllabus: • Instructor’s instructional philosophy • Detailed course objectives (both content and process) • General education curriculum goals • Motivation and description of PBL • Problem solving process and strategies • Roles and responsibilities of students, peer tutors, and instructor • List of frequently asked questions about PBL and working in groups • Forms for assessment of individual performance in groups • Some thoughts on grading • Anonymous suggestion box and responses to suggestions • Academic Services Center • Policies on academic dishonesty and responsible computing

  34. Organizing the Course Web Sites and Web Pages Syllabus Groups Groups Student Reports and Projects

  35. Organizing Groups Groups Identity: Rosters, photos, addresses Vehicles for communication Vehicles for collaboration

  36. Organizing Groups Groups Student to student Student to professor Professor to group Vehicles for communication Student to group Professor to student

  37. Organizing Groups Groups bulletin boards, newsgroups Group to group Egroups.com chatrooms, filesharing, scheduling meetings Vehicles for collaboration CMS: WebCT controlled discussion forums, collaborative space, whiteboarding Group to professor

  38. Organizingthe Course Utilizing Online Resources Utilizing Online Resources

  39. Utilizing Online Resources Web Sites and Web Pages Ingredients for writing problems Inspiration for designing problems Information for solving problems

  40. Ingredients for writing problems

  41. Inspiration for designing problems

  42. Information for solving problems

  43. Utilizing Online Resources Web Sites and Web Pages Ingredients for writing problems Creating images with scanners, digital cameras Background facts from networked databases Borrowing images from other sites

  44. Web Sites and Web Pages Utilizing Online Resources Online regional newspapers for local perspective International newspapers for global view Inspiration for designing problems Quack websites for “raw” material Film and TV sites for scripts and characters