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Materials Handling

Materials Handling

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Materials Handling

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  1. Materials Handling IENG 331 – Safety Engineering Carter J. Kerk, PhD, PE, CSP, PE Industrial Engineering Department South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

  2. Reading Assignment • Brauer, Chapter 15 (Not Section 15-2) • Required Review Questions, p. 278-9 • 7, 9, 11, 13 • Recommended Review Questions • For those who have not or will not take IENG 321 • 1-5 • Read Section 15-2 • Not required

  3. 29 CFR 1910 Subpart N • 176 – Handling materials – general • 177 – Servicing multi-piece and single piece rim wheels • 178 – Powered industrial trucks • 179 – Overhead and gantry cranes • 180 – Crawler locomotive and truck cranes • 181 – Derricks • 183 – Helicopters • 184 - Slings

  4. Introduction • Non-manual materials handling • industrial trucks, tractors, cranes, conveyors • MH responsible for 20-25% of occupational injuries • MH responsible for 6% of OSHA general industry citations • Industry moves 50 – 180 tons of material for each ton produced • Manual materials handling (e.g., lifting) • IENG 321

  5. Types of Injuries & Accidents • Mass - Motion Hazards • Human Body • Pinch, fracture, sever, crush • Facilities, Equipment, Materials • gas lines, electrical lines, load-bearing walls, fires

  6. Materials Storage • Stacking • items should be stacked, blocked, interlocked, and limited in height • standards are not specific as to “how”, but are expected to achieve a desired “result”, therefore this is a “performance standard” • Side Issue • “Performance Standard” vs. “Specification Standard”?? • Housekeeping • sloppy storage housekeeping can lead to trip hazards, fire, pests, vegetation (outside)

  7. Material Storage (continued) • Egress • keep aisles and exits clear • During high production swings • be prepared for problems • Over-stacking • egress blocking • “creative” storage

  8. Industrial Trucks • Electric and internal combustion • Forklifts, tractors, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks, farm tractors, specialized industrial trucks

  9. Industrial Truck Selection • Complex because there are 11 different design classifications segregated by • type of power: diesel, electric, gasoline, LP gas • degree of hazard for which approved • Biggest hazard: fires & explosions • more expensive trucks have features to prevent ignition of fires and explosions • See next three diagrams for selection process

  10. Industrial Truck Operations • Fueling • no smoking around re-fueling stations • battery charging in designated areas only • better control of acid spillage, lifting of batteries, battery gases and fumes (ignitable) • good ventilation, emergency eyewash and shower • Internal Combustion Engines • CO hazard (50 ppm for 8 hour TWA) • Switch to electric? Better ventilation? Unnecessary idling?

  11. Truck Operations (continued) • Lighting requirements (illumination analysis) • Visibility • Hitchhikers & “elevators” • Unattended trucks (out of sight or > 25’) • Daily inspections (horns, lights, brakes) • Training Programs (29 CFR 1910.178)

  12. Forklift – Tipover and Stability

  13. Forklift – Transitions and Chocking

  14. Cranes • Many types (see next slide) • Rated loads (included safety factor) must be plainly marked • “Two-blocking” and “over-travel” • Prevent with: limit switches and bumpers • Electric shocks & power failures • Pendants - human factors issues (see slide) • Braking & “plugging” • Maintenance (lockout/tagout)

  15. Types of overhead cranes.

  16. Hand-held pendant for overhead crane. Human factors issues: directional incompatibility between crane movement and controls.

  17. Block & Tackle • Free body diagram

  18. Securing Wire Rope Loops “Don’t saddle a dead horse.” Right and wrong ways to secure wire rope loops using U-bolt clips. (a) Incorrect – “saddle” is on dead end of rope; (b) Incorrect – clips are staggered both ways; (c) Correct – all clips are placed with the saddle assembly on the live portion of the rope and the U-bolt on the dead end.

  19. Hoist Chains vs. Chain Slings Hoist chains are commonly misinterpreted to include chain slings. A separate standard exists for slings.

  20. Crane Hook Inspection

  21. Slings • Rope, fiber, chain, etc. • Rated capacity needed in conjunction with leg angles • 3 legs are better than 2, but 4 are not better than three, why? • Inspections

  22. Sling Angle

  23. Material Handling Industry of America • Trade Association • www.mhia.org • Case studies, equipment photos, applications