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Grant Writing

Grant Writing

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Grant Writing

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  1. Grant Writing Bill Latimer, Ph.D., M.P.H. Professor and Chair Clinical and Health Psychology College of Public Health and Health Professions University of Florida

  2. Grants are Good

  3. Research Staff

  4. South Africa Study Staff: Tshidi Mabala, Sam Ntshegang, Bill Latimer, Dr. Anne-Gloria Moleko, Maria More, Naomi Molfe

  5. Veronica Dixon (Principal, Highlandtown Middle School)

  6. US State Department • Humphrey Fellowship

  7. State Department Reception

  8. Approach to Grant WritingGeneral Principles Always be Positive (Almost) Always Follow Your Passion Do not Delude Yourself that Anyone Agrees with You or Your Passion Network and Build a Team (Always ask) No Researcher Exists on an Island (unless you exist on an island) Get Ready for Pain and Suffering Get Over Your Fear (and ego) and Get Brutal Internal Reviewers Get Ready for More Pain And Suffering (i.e., revision)

  9. Selecting an Idea NIH Program Staff-Two Approaches: To Consult or Not to Consult [NIH Priorities Matter (especially now)]

  10. Selecting a Mechanism R01; R21; R03; K PA vs. RFA

  11. What All Funded Grants Had (in my opinion) *Compelling and Clear Logic of Public Health Significance *Compelling and Clear Logic of Innovation *Explicit and Simple Aims with Specific Measures *A Conceptual Model Figure *Empirically and Conceptually Driven Hypotheses *Preliminary Studies Tables that Support Hypotheses *Preliminary Studies that Support Feasibility *Study Design Figure *Timeline Figure/Table *Power Analyses Graphs/Figures/Tables that Inform Sample Size *Predict and Address Limitations

  12. Significance • The criminal justice system is an epicenter of the US HIV epidemic with estimates suggesting upwards of 20% of all HIV infected adults pass through US jails and prisons each year [5, 22-25]. A gap in the criminal justice field is evident as reentry programs designed to prevent HIV upon release have largely focused on inmates released from prison and exclude the much larger population of jail arrestees [26-29]. The significance of targeting arrestees is highlighted by studies demonstrating that short-term incarcerations are more strongly associated with elevated HIV risk behaviors upon release than long-term incarcerations [30-32].

  13. Innovation The proposed study is characterized by key innovations that have the potential to advance HIV prevention and treatment science by developing a science-based intervention to reduce HIV transmission fueled by drug dependent women who are pregnant. • Focus on drug dependent pregnant women • Coordination of CBT and family systems approaches • Follow-Up Assessment over 18-month period • Biological assessment of HIV and STIs • Collaboration with CAP

  14. Simple Aims with Specific Measures • Aim 1.To evaluate the separate and possibly synergistic effects of Family Management and Teen Achievement Interventions on post-intervention drug use, problem behavior, psychological distress, and academic achievement of indicated adolescents. • Aim 2.To examine mediated outcome pathways whereby skills (e.g., learning skills) and behavior change processes (e.g., adaptive family communication) targeted by the family and teen interventions result in successful outcomes. • Aim 3.To evaluate the degree to which intervention effects vary as a function of pretreatment client characteristics on neurocognitive, internalizing/externalizing, and demographic factors to discern for whom family and teen interventions work best.

  15. Conceptual Model of Integrated Family and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy IFCBT Drug Abuse and Infectious Disease Risk Factors across Multiple Ecological Systems Protective Factors Targeted by IFCBT IFCBT Targeted Outcomes • Individual • Therapy: • Executive • Function-Type • Skills Informed • by NP Assess. • Poor Health Care Access • Executive • Function-Type Skills: • Planning • Decision Making • Predicting • Evaluation • Impulse Control • Integration • Direct: • Direct and • Mediated: • Deviant Social Networks • Psychological Well-Being • Reduced Sexual Risk Behavior • Social Support • Health Care and Self Help Access • Family Pathology • Partner Conflict • Group Therapy: • Rational Emotive Therapy • Problem Solving Therapy • Individual Factors: • Neurocognitive • Deficits • Irrational Beliefs • Alcohol/Illicit Drug Use • Psychiatric Comorbidity • Sexual Risk Behavior • Cognitive Skills Fostered by Group Therapy: • Awareness of • Irrational Beliefs • Rational Beliefs Problem Solving Skills Couples/Family Therapy: Structural & Strategic Therapies • Social Support: • Group Members • Intimate Partner • Family Members • Drug Abstinence • No Infectious Disease Transmission/Acquisition

  16. What All Funded Grants Had (in my opinion) *Preliminary Studies Tables that Support Hypotheses

  17. We conducted a pilot test and the proposed study site. Among the 200 drug users approached to enroll in the study 196 provided consent (x%). Among the 196 who provided consent 172 completed the baseline assessment (x%). Among the 172 who completed the baseline assessment 145 completed more than 70% of the intervention and 162 completed more than 50% of the intervention. Of the 172 who completed the baseline assessment and attended 1 or more intervention sessions, 153 completed the 3-month follow-up assessment. *Preliminary Studies that Support Feasibility

  18. *Timeline Figure/Table

  19. *Power Analyses Graphs/Figures/Tables that Inform Sample Size

  20. *Predict and Address Limitations Study Limitations and Offsetting Strengths. As in any randomized prevention trial, our proposed study will face a number of challenges to its design and feasibility. To meet challenges associated with participant recruitment, we will …Non-compliance can also be a serious form of bias in prevention trials. To meet challenges associated with compliance…. Differential follow-up can also be a serious form of bias in prospective studies of at-risk populations. Well-tested follow-up procedures will be used to…We also recognize that the feasibility of administering the total number of planned assessments may be questioned. To meet this challenge, the timing of the baseline, process, and outcome assessments have been organized to ensure…Throughout the proposal, we have also sought to reduce or eliminate other sources of potential bias. For example…In addition, we recognize the challenge associated with administering a 2.5-hour battery of neuropsychological tests and self-report tools to at-risk youth at the baseline and 12-month assessment points. We hope to successfully meet this challenge through…The sample will also not be fully representative of minority groups. However, an off-setting strength of the study is its anticipated equal representation of both genders and of African American and White adolescents thereby allowing for comparisons between these groups.

  21. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • D2. Interventions • D2.1. Family Management Intervention (FMI). • A. Parent Focus Curriculum • B. Brief Family Intervention • D2.2. Teen Achievement Intervention. • A. Teen Achievement Curriculum • B. Reciprocal Peer Tutoring • D2.3. Self-Change Control Condition.

  22. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • D3. Measures • D3.1. Intervention Fidelity Variables • D3.2. Drug Abuse Risk and Protective Factors • D3.3. Cognitive Functions. • D3.4. Process Measures. • D3.5. Outcome Measures.

  23. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • D4. Study Hypotheses Informed by Ecological Theory and Empirical Findings. • Aim 1. To evaluate the separate and possibly synergistic effects of Family Management and Teen Achievement Interventions on post-intervention drug use, problem behavior, psychological distress, and academic achievement of indicated adolescents. • Aim 2. To elucidate mediated outcome pathways whereby skills (e.g., learning skills) and behavior change processes (e.g., adaptive family communication) targeted by the family and teen interventions result in successful outcomes. • Aim 3. To evaluate moderated intervention outcomes by pretreatment client characteristics.

  24. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • D5. Instruments • D5.1. Intervention Fidelity and Clinical Change Tools Completed by Trained Raters. • D5.2. Tools for Parents and Adolescents. • D5.3. Tools for Parents and Teachers. • D5.4. Tools for Adolescents Only. • D5.5. Neuropsychological Assessment Battery for Adolescents. • D5.6. Tools for Parents Only. • D5.7. School Records and Standardized Achievement Test Scores.

  25. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • D6. Intervention Fidelity. • D6.1. Clinician Training Protocol. • D6.2 Ongoing Evaluation of Intervention Fidelity. • D7. Baseline Sample Size Needed To Obtain Sufficient Power At Follow-Up Allowing For Attrition. • D8. Study Population. • D9. Middle School Study Sites: • D10. Recruitment Procedures: • D11. Intervention Delivery.

  26. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • D12. Data Collection: • D12.1. Baseline Assessment. • D12.2. Process Assessment. • D12.3. Outcome Assessment. • D13. Data Analysis Plan. • D14. Preliminary Analyses. • D14.1. Coding Session Videotapes to Derive Clinical Change Process Measures • D14.2. Controlling for Possible Clinician Effects. • D14.3. Controlling for Possible School Cohort Effects.

  27. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • D14.4. Controlling for Possible Client Intake Problem Severity Between Groups • D15. Data Analysis Plan to Address Study Aims • Aim 1. Direct Effects of Family Management and Teen Achievement Interventions. • Aim 1.1. Intervention Effects on Continuous Outcomes. • Aim 1.2. Intervention Effects on Time-to-Event Outcomes. • Aim 1.3. Intervention Effects on Targeted Change Processes. • Aim 1.4. Intervention Effects on Skill Acquisition and Problem Behavior Trajectories.

  28. Research Plan Section Approach (Example) • Aim 2.Effect-Mediation • Aim 2.1. Mediated Intervention Outcomes. • Aim 2.2. Intervention Effects on Distal Outcomes Through Skill Acquisition Trajectories. • Aim 2.3. Client Group Involvement Effects on Outcome. • Aim 3.Effect-Modification. • Aim 3.1. To Identify For Whom Interventions Work Best. • Aim 3.2. Evaluate Non-Compliance Effects. • D16. Study Limitations and Offsetting Strengths.

  29. Other Stuff Early Career Investigator New Investigator Supplements Special Mechanisms

  30. Other Stuff Introduce Your Team Consultants Letters Bios Budget Justification

  31. Other Stuff Early Career Investigator New Investigator Supplements Special Mechanisms

  32. Other Stuff Early Career Investigator New Investigator Supplements Special Mechanisms

  33. Thank you!