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Learning Agriculture Through Supervised Experiences

Learning Agriculture Through Supervised Experiences

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Learning Agriculture Through Supervised Experiences

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  1. Learning Agriculture Through Supervised Experiences Gary Briers and John Hall AGSC 327 Spring 2009

  2. Today’s Objectives • Discuss the philosophy and the theory that support SAEs • List primary purposes of SAEs • Describe benefits of SAEs • Define the major types of SAEs • Identify potential SAEs

  3. Philosophy of SAE • Pragmatism (primarily) • Peirce, James, and Dewey • What we do has a practical use/purpose; it works! • Realism (science) • Existentialism (do your thing) • Idealism (strive for perfection)

  4. Learning Theory Supporting SAE • Experiential learning • Learning by doing • Permanent learning • W. H. Lancelot • Primary principles of interest • Cone of experience • Edgar Dale • Direct, purposeful experiences

  5. Where did the idea of SAE originate—directly and historically? • Rufus W. Stimson • Father of the “home project” • Home project reinforced classroom instruction and provided practice • Massachusetts, 1900s

  6. Do SAEs have LEGISLATIVE roots? • Smith-Hughes Act of 1917 • “… directed or supervised practice in agriculture, either on a farm provided by the school or other farm, for at least six months per year.”

  7. What are the purposes of SAE? • Promote / cause learning! • Apply concepts learned in class. • Develop technical skills related to career success. • Develop good personal habits and responsibility. • Develop record keeping skills.

  8. Program vs. Project (SAEP) • P is for PROGRAM • Activity vs. Records • No records without the activity • Practice/Application vs. Learning • Is there any debate?

  9. What are the benefits of SAEs—to the student? • Contextualize learning (relevance). • Help make career choices. • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. • Expand technical competence. • Gain valuable experience. • Earn money. • Qualify for FFA degrees and awards.

  10. What are the benefits of SAEs—to the teacher? • Improve school/community relations. • Enhance classroom instruction. • Provide real-world application of content (“teachable moments”). • Increase interest of students. • Promote parental involvement. • Developpublicawarenessoftheprogram. • Provide for year-round instruction.

  11. What are the types of SAEPs? • Entrepreneurial (ownership) • Student owns all or part of the enterprise(s). • Examples: • Animal production enterprise • Lawn care business • Vegetable production enterprise • Web-design business

  12. What are the types of SAEPs? • Placement • Student works for an agricultural business/operation—paid or not. • Examples: • Work on a farm or ranch. • Work at a feed store. • Work at a tree nursery. • Work for a web-design business.

  13. What are the types of SAEPs? • Exploratory • Student undertakes activities to explore a job or a career. • Examples: • Shadow a veterinarian. • Prepare a report on a job or a PPT on a career. • Visit a college to talk about a major. • Interviewthemanagerofafloral shop.

  14. What are the types of SAEPs? • Improvement • Student undertakes a project to improve the community,school,home. • Examples: • Landscape school grounds. • Rewire an implement shed. • Tile the kitchen floor. • Build a new composting bin. • Paint the four-wheeler trailer.

  15. References Moore, G. E. (n.d.). Why SAE? Powerpoint Presentation from AAE 322. Raleigh: North Carolina State University. National Council for Agricultural Education. (1992). Experiencing agriculture: A handbook for supervised agricultural experience. Newcomb, L. H., McCracken, J. D., Warmbrod, J. R., & Whitington, M. S. (2004). Methods of teaching agriculture (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.