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Ann Carroll, MPH Office of Brownfields & Land Revitalization (OBLR) September 25, 2012 PowerPoint Presentation
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Ann Carroll, MPH Office of Brownfields & Land Revitalization (OBLR) September 25, 2012

Ann Carroll, MPH Office of Brownfields & Land Revitalization (OBLR) September 25, 2012

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Ann Carroll, MPH Office of Brownfields & Land Revitalization (OBLR) September 25, 2012

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  1. Ann Carroll, MPH Office of Brownfields & Land Revitalization (OBLR) September 25, 2012

  2. Challenges / Opportunities 450,000+ Brownfields 1,714 Corrective Action sites 100,000-200,000 LUST (abandoned) 6,700 RCRA Sites 40,000 CERLCIS sites >1,600 Superfund (NPL) sites

  3. Source: National Vacant Property Campaign

  4. Brownfield Communities & Health Challenges • Training workers protects them, their co-workers, and clients. • Teaching them safe practices protects them, co-workers, site neighbors and their families. That is community health! • Individual site hazards and risks to community • Contaminated soil, dust, surface water runoff or groundwater • Physical and safety hazards of deteriorating structures, lead paint, asbestos, pit or open foundations as ‘attractive nuisance’. • Restrict access and reduce or prevent exposure through fencing, signs, cleanup, caps and other remedies. • Broader community profile • Dumping, vagrancy, fires, vandalism, crime • Sub-standard housing - lead hazards of paint, dust and soil, pesticides, illegal dumping, and hazards from past site industry or use • Low income population, often minority, un/underemployed, job loss, property value decline, fear, social isolation, reduced access to general and health care services, higher chronic disease burden, poorer nutritional status, less access to healthy food, disintegrating social fabric. HMTRI– October 2012

  5. No Risk because there is No Hazard! No Risk because there is No Exposure! Risk = Hazard + Exposure on site Physical hazards Environmental hazards – Soil contaminants Exposure - dermal, ingestion and inhalation risks from preparing site and gardening Exposure – eating food – surface contamination or plant uptake Versus Risks of: Doing nothing …with blighted site ! Risk = Hazard + Exposure

  6. Contamination … obvious or subtle? HMTRI– October 2012

  7. Petroleum and hydrocarbons • Lead and other metals • Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) • Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) • Pesticides • Asbestos, mixtures … Typical Brownfield Contaminants? O’Hara Township, Allegheny County

  8. Physical Activity Walkability, Recreation and Transit Appropriate for all Ages Respiratory Health Indoor and Outdoor Air Emotional/Mental Social Capital Link to reduced violence Access to Services Food Health Care Greenspace and Recreation Development Approaches Smart Growth and New Urbanism Green Buildings Community Greening Community Services focused Potential Economic Valuation ‘Living Wage’ and Job Growth emphasis Increase private sector value for key redevelopment scenarios Re/Development Choices & Public Health EWDJT trainees help create sustainable communities! HMTRI– October 2012

  9. HMTRI– October 2012

  10. Ann Carroll US EPA Brownfields Florida Brownfields Association, Nov 7-9, 2007 Columbia, Lancaster County