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Economic Development Presentation – NCDA 2013 Annual Meeting PowerPoint Presentation
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Economic Development Presentation – NCDA 2013 Annual Meeting

Economic Development Presentation – NCDA 2013 Annual Meeting

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Economic Development Presentation – NCDA 2013 Annual Meeting

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  1. Economic Development Presentation – NCDA 2013 Annual Meeting By James Barnes Community Development Director Lawrence, MA

  2. My Background • HUD 36 years • UDAG’s • 108’s • CDBG Economic Development Training and Monitoring • City CD Director last five years • 108 • CDBG Small Business Loan Fund • Commercial Façade Program

  3. Currently Working On • Restarting Small Business Revolving Loan Fund • On hiatus for 7 years • Our loan portfolio either repaid or defaulted – no more income • We have $500,000 to work with • Re-started in 2012 • First wave of applicants not qualified

  4. Currently Working On - 2 • Starting a Micro Enterprise Lending Program • Taking half of the fund • Fewer compliance issues • Hired a Technical Assistance Contractor with a financial “boot camp” program • Establishing a relationship with new CDC financial stability center • Most of our “applicants” last year were micro anyway

  5. Six Challenges to Doing Economic Development with CDBG From both a HUD and City perspective

  6. 1. The Promoters vs The Realists • Promoter's proposal: 108 loan to cut through two floors of an historic mill to accommodate a battery manufacturer’s cranes. • Realist’s proposal: small loan to buy 4 computerized sewing machines to increase growing company’s output. Located in old mill with high vacancies

  7. 2. Markets Change • A lot of time goes into developing a city business loan program • Big projects (such as one funded with 108) take time Our Gateway example • Mill occupancy dropped instead of increasing • No longer demand for parking, no parking revenues to pay 108 loan

  8. 3. A Program Without Focus • Little Impact • Susceptible to political interference • Difficult to market – audience too broad

  9. 4. Staff Competencies • HUD Regulations • The lending culture and language • Internal processes and controls • Documents • The local business environment

  10. 5. Working with New Type of Borrower • New Immigrant Small Business Owner • Social Enterprise • New Young Entrepreneur

  11. 6. Borrower Capacities • New Immigrant entrepreneurs • No banking relationships • Cash basis • Grey economy participants • Borrowing at high rates • Language and cultural barriers

  12. Borrower Capacities (2) • Recent college grads and social entrepreneurs • Large student loans • Lots of energy & enthusiasm • Impatient with city processes • Pitch contests and instant gratification

  13. Recommendations

  14. Build/Hire Expertise or Contract for Expertise You Don’t Have • Underwriting • Technical assistance and training • Closings • Servicing • Collections

  15. Understand the Market

  16. The Importance of Underwriting • In house or consultant • Double check the assumptions and the market analysis • Do it even if not required (for instance with micro enterprises) – OMB Circulars do apply

  17. Avoid 570.203 Special Economic Development ActivitiesIf You Can Do It Another Way

  18. Borrow from Best Practices • Lowell, Massachusetts • Davenport, Iowa • MadisonDevelopment Corporation, Wisconsin

  19. Lowell, MA • Small Business Loan • Best Retail Practices (Matching Grants) • Downtown Venture Fund • Start Up Retail in Downtown • Contact Theresa Park Tpark@lowellma.gov

  20. DDJ - The Genesis and Program Details • Why the Program Was Created • The City of Davenport sought to create an extraordinary incentive in order to encourage business creation and expansion in our downtown. • Program Details • Businesses creating jobs in the DDJ can opt for either: • A $3,000 per job created 0% interest loan for 60 months OR • A $1,000 per job cash grant (set up in the City’s system as a forgivable loan pending the actual job creation) • All businesses have two years to create the jobs pledged and then must maintain them for three additional years.

  21. City of Davenport, Iowa Please contact Bruce Berger at (563) 328-6706 or beb@ci.davenport.ia.us for additional information.

  22. Madison Development Corporation • Funding “hard to finance” local businesses and creating jobs since 1977 • CDBG supported Revolving Loan Fund of $3.6 million • Originated over 400 loans • Helped create over 4,000 jobs • Self-sustainable, receiving no operating grants, since 1980’s: Operations funded entirely from interest earned and fees • Meeting Madison’s changing credit needs • Evolving to be a leader in financing Madison’s high-technology sector

  23. Frank Staniszewski, PresidentFrank@mdcorp.org

  24. Use Available Training Resources • Paul Webster, Mark Tigan Presentations to NCDA • National Community Development Council • HUD’s Economic Development Toolbox • HUD’s “One CPD” Technical Assistance

  25. Final Thoughts

  26. Complex Projects Take Time

  27. New vehicle/ pedestrian Bridge over the North Canal Riverfront playground and community gardens Brownfield remediation, new storm water system, and improved parking Streetscape improvements and utility upgrades

  28. Non “Economic Development” Projects are Economic Drivers

  29. Union Crossing Phase One 50 Island Street/ One Union Street