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Static Techniques for V&V

Static Techniques for V&V

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Static Techniques for V&V

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  1. Static Techniques for V&V

  2. Hierarchy of V&V techniques V&V Dynamic Techniques Static Techniques Informal Analysis Formal Analysis Testing Symbolic Execution Simulation Model Checking Static Analysis Walkthrough Inspection Proofs Review

  3. Analysis • Different from experimenting (testing). • Based on a model • Source code or abstracted source code • Not the actual product (executable).

  4. Analysis • Can be subject to failure itself (wrong proof) • Similar to mathematical proofs • Start with conjecture • Try to show it is a theorem • Find either

  5. Informal Analysis • Reviews • Inspections • Walkthroughs

  6. Code Reviews: • Read. If you can’t read it, neither can the people trying to maintain it • Do this for any artifact • This is a team effort

  7. Walk-through: • Simulate by hand, pick test cases, generalize • Looking for any bugs • Keep size small (3-5) • Players get documentation ahead of time • Meeting is restricted to a few hours

  8. Code Inspections: • Looking for specific bugs • Common bugs: • Un-initialized variables • Jumps into loops • Incompatible assignments (type errors) • Non-termination • Out-of-bounds • Memory leaks • Parameter mismatches

  9. (Semi) Formal Analysis Techniques • Proofs • Static checking • Code analysis: syntax errors and simple error patterns (i.e. Pointer problems) • Structure checking: CFGs with structural error detection (dead code, logic errors)

  10. Formal correctness proofs {true} Begin read (a); read (b); x = a + b; write (x) end; {output = input1 + input2} Precondition Post condition

  11. Proof Step 1 {true} Begin read (a); read (b); x = a + b; write (x) end; {output = input1 + input2} Due to the semantics of write(), the post condition holds iff {x=input1 + input2} holds

  12. Proof Step 2 {true} Begin read (a); read (b); x = a + b; write (x) end; {output = input1 + input2} {x=input1 + input2} holds iff {a+b = input1 + input2}

  13. Proof Step 3 {true} Begin read (a); read (b); x = a + b; write (x) end; {output = input1 + input2} Since the semantics of read(a) and read(b) assign input1 to a and input2 to b, {a+b = input1 + input2} holds

  14. Basic Idea • For any postcondition POST on program variables, and • For any assignment statement x = expr, • expr is an expression containing variables • POST holds after the assignment iff POST’ holds before the assignment

  15. Basic Idea • We want to show that whenever the preconditions hold, the postconditions must hold, that is • Pre -> Post • We can take post conditions and derive necessary and sufficient conditions, then show the preconditions match these.

  16. Notes • We assume there are no side effects in expr.

  17. Consider examples • {x = 5} x = x + 1 {x = 6} • {z-43 > y + 7} x = z – 43 {x > y + 7}

  18. Sequences • Suppose you have shown {F1} S1 {F2} and {F2} S2 {F3} • You can deduce • {F1} S1;S2 {F3}

  19. Consider conditional: {true} if x >= y then max = x else max = y; { (max = x or max = y) AND (max >= x and max >= y) }

  20. Proof informally by cases: assume x >= y. then { (x = x or x = y) AND (x >= x and x >= y) }, which is true.

  21. Rules of inference, conditional: • Given {pre and condition} s1 {post} and {pre and not condition} s2 {post} • Infer {pre} if condition then s1 else s2 {post}

  22. Loop invariants • I is a loop invariant • cond is the loop condition (while loop) • S is the body of the loop

  23. Loop example: {x > y} while (x <> 0) x = x –2 y = y –2 end while {x > y and x = 0} Invariant

  24. Loop example: {x > y} while (x <> 0) x = x –2 y = y –2 end while {x > y and x = 0} Note: Loop is not guaranteed to terminate

  25. Loops example: • Can easily show that if x > y at exit, it must have been so at entry. • Might need induction to do these in general. • Notice, this loop does not end if x is odd on entry.

  26. Example {input1>0 and input2>0} begin read(x); read(y); div=0; while x>=y loop div = div + 1; x = x – y; end loop; write (div); write (x); end {input1 = output1*input2 + output2 and 0<=output2<input2}

  27. Notes: • Formal proofs may be more complex than the program • Proofs are error prone if done by hand • Proofs require mathematical sophistication • Proofs may be overwhelming to do

  28. Notes 2: • Proofs rely on a semantic model of the environment (language, processor): They only provide assurance under this model • Proofs may depend on continuous systems, not discrete systems • Are they useful? • only for very small parts of the code. • they can be automated (PVS, for example) • Many research issues here

  29. Notes 3 • Automated Theorem Provers: ACL2, HOL, Isabelle, Clam/Oyster • Theorem proving frameworks for software • Outline:

  30. Symbolic execution • Similar to testing, but instead of individual test cases, you have symbolic generalization • each test is a test of an entire class of tests. (testing, one element of equiv class. symbolic, entire class). • Plan: try to get path coverage. How? In general, abstract the source code with respect to some property. Then do symbolic execution of every path through abstracted code. • Research problem. 

  31. Model Checking • Exhaustive search through state space of program (complete state space expansion) • Form of symbolic execution • Problem: state space

  32. Model Checker • Model software as FSA (what’s that?) • Model properties in some logic, usually temporal logic (LTL, CTL) • Represent FSA as a graph (what’s that?) • Traverse graph (how?) • Show properties hold in each node of graph

  33. Model Checking • What does it mean if an assertion does not hold in the model? • What does it mean if the assertion does hold in the model?

  34. Automated Programming • Automatically generate programs from specifications • Deductive Synthesis: extract a program from a proof

  35. Cleanroom • Build software in such a way as to prevent defects from being introduced. No testing. • Specify system. • Refine specification systematically, proving that the refinement meets the specification

  36. Transformational Programming • Take an input string and rewrite it: • aBc => axyc • Rules can have conditions • Rules can have procedural attachment or be higher order • Formal, stepwise refinement of specification to program • Can check each step individually • “correct” by construction