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2009–2010 Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) Training for Teachers Dr. Peggy Guebert, System Test Coordinator PowerPoint Presentation
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2009–2010 Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) Training for Teachers Dr. Peggy Guebert, System Test Coordinator

2009–2010 Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) Training for Teachers Dr. Peggy Guebert, System Test Coordinator

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2009–2010 Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) Training for Teachers Dr. Peggy Guebert, System Test Coordinator

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  1. 2009–2010 Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) Training for Teachers Dr. Peggy Guebert, System Test Coordinator Terri Baggarly, Special Education Test Consultant Coweta Committed to Student Success

  2. Introduction • At the completion of today’s session, GAA Teachers, Test Coordinators, and those responsible for conducting reviews of the GAA will understand the 2009-2010 GAA collection and submission process. • A companion New Teacher GAA Introduction Presentation Fall 2009 is available at http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ci_testing.aspx?PageReq=CI_TESTING_GAAand is strongly recommended as an introduction to the terminology, requirements, and procedures for compiling student portfolios for all teachers new to the GAA. Coweta Committed to Student Success

  3. Introduction • Each presentation serves as introductory components of training. Reading and understanding the GAA Examiner’s Manual, 2009-2010, is necessary to implement the portfolio process successfully. • Examiner’s Manual Verification forms are due from GAA teachers to Peggy Guebert no later than September 18, 2009. School Test Coordinators are strongly encouraged to read and understand the manual as well. • Monthly DOE Elluminate session participation is required of all GAA teachers. Sessions may be viewed live or as a recording within one week of the live presentation. • Membership in the GAA Resource Board will be set up and/or renewed for all GAA teachers.

  4. CCSS GAA Timeline 2009-10 • September 1, 2009: GAA testing window opens • September 25, 2009: Detailed planning sheets due to school test coordinators • November 20, 2009: Deadline for Collection Period 1 implementation • February 12, 2010: Deadline for Collection Period 2 implementation • March 5, 2010: Deadline to complete school reviews of completed portfolios • March 8-12, 2010: Submit complete portfolios to Werz • March 31, 2010: GAA Test window closes

  5. Local Supports • Three work days will be scheduled for each teacher administering the GAA according to the following: • Day 1 must be scheduled during Collection Pd 1 • Day 2 must be scheduled during Collection Pd 2 • The final day must be scheduled between February 15 and March 5, 2010 • All teachers will be provided substitute coverage. • Work with your school administration to schedule these days.

  6. Shipment of Materials • Shipment 1 – Delivered to systems August 26-28, 2009, will contain all Manuals, Administrative Forms, and Binders. • Shipment 2 – Delivered February 2-3, 2010, will contain Pre-ID labels, Student Demographic Information Forms, and Return Kits.

  7. Transfer Students In-County Transfers: • School Test Coordinators (not GAA teachers) are responsible for the secure transfer of GAA portfolios from school to school within Coweta County. • A Portfolio Transfer Form must be completed and submitted to Lisa Putnam at Werz within 3 days.

  8. Transfer Students In-State, Out-of-County Transfers: • When a student is withdrawing to another school system within the state of Georgia, it is the responsibility of the school test coordinator to coordinate the secure transfer of the GAA portfolio and all its required contents to the system testing office for shipment. • Transfer of GAA portfolios should be arranged through Lisa Putnam or Peggy Guebert. The up-to-date portfolio must be hand delivered to the testing office at Werz. • GAA teachers may have up to 3 days to complete any in progress materials and have the portfolio up to date and ready for transfer.

  9. Transfer Students continued In-State, Out-of-County Transfers: • The school/system from which a student has withdrawn is responsible for sending the portfolio, including all evidence to date, to the student’s new school/system. Please notify Peggy Guebert if you receive a GAA transfer from outside our system so that we may request any alternate assessment materials. • A complete portfolio must be submitted for any student on alternative assessment in the state of Georgia in March, regardless of when the student entered the school/system. • A Portfolio Transfer Form must be completed and submitted to Lisa Putnam at Werz within 3 days.

  10. Transfer Students Out-of-State Transfers: • The system from which a student has withdrawn is responsible for sending any alternate assessment materials to the student’s new school/system. Please notify Peggy Guebert if you receive a GAA transfer from out of state so that we may request materials. • When a student is entering from outside the state of Georgia, it is the responsibility of the system test coordinator to coordinate the secure transfer of any alternate assessment materials. • Pickup of any alternate assessment materials should be arranged through Lisa Putnam or Peggy Guebert. The portfolio must be picked up by the school test coordinator from the system testing office at Werz.

  11. Transfer Students continued Out-of-State Transfers: • If enrolled after January 1, 2010, must have at least the first Collection Period completed. • Contact Terri Baggarly for guidance on all out-of-state transfers entering late in the year. (You need approval to bubble the “Not Complete” space on the SDIF for the content area that is submitted in the portfolio.) • A Portfolio Transfer Form must be completed and submitted to Lisa Putnam at Werz within 3 days.

  12. Portfolio Transfer Form Remember, a Portfolio Transfer Form must be completed and submitted to Lisa Putnam at Werz within 3 days. Transfer forms may be found on the intranet as well as the special education website. The Building Administrator and teacher from the sending system as well as the receiving system must sign the Portfolio Transfer Form when a student transfers in-state.

  13. Test Security • Student work used as evidence and completed entry forms are considered secure test documents. • Student work and materials used for the GAA must be kept in locked storage, except during use. (Locked in desk, file drawer, closet, school vault, etc.) • Access is restricted to authorized personnel only. • Teachers administering the GAA must have access to all materials, including binders, forms, and manuals as soon as possible following delivery.

  14. The Role of the Parent Occasionally, parents request to play an active role in the development of the GAA. The following guidance is provided by the state department: Parents may meet with school staff to review the blueprint, discuss standards and elements, and participate in the initial discussion, offering input on strengths and weaknesses, etc. However; the teacher will make the final determination as to which standards and elements are selected to be assessed on the GAA and which tasks will be evidence. Parents cannot be made aware of the specific standards and elements ultimately selected for assessment.

  15. Viewing of Contents by Parents • The portfolio merges instructional and assessment activities. • While parents may not review the assembled portfolio, they may review coursework, including that which may eventually be used in the portfolio. You may make copies of coursework for this purpose. • Once evidence is collected and the portfolio is assembled, the completed portfolio becomes a secure document and can be viewed only by authorized personnel. Contact Peggy Guebert or Terri Baggarly regarding all parent requests to review completed portfolios and we will contact the GaDOE as appropriate.

  16. Overview of the GAA • The GAA is a portfolio of student work provided as evidence that a student is making progress toward grade-level academic standards, often at a pre-requisite or entry level. • Evidence provided must show student work that is aligned to specific grade-level standards, adapted to meet the student’s cognitive, communication, physical and/or sensory impairments. • The GAA meets NCLB and IDEA mandates.

  17. Overview of the GAA • The portfolio system is designed to be flexible to allow for the diversity of the students participating in the GAA. • Students are assessed in the same content areas as their peers on the same curriculum. • The GA has followed GPS implementation schedule. • The GPS is now being assessed for all grades and content areas with the exception of grade 11 math. (QCC until the 2010-2011 administration)

  18. Portfolio Components • Grades K-2 ELA: 2 entries Math: 2 entries • Grades 3-8 and 11 ELA: 2 entries Math: 2 entries Science: 1 entry Social Studies: 1 entry

  19. Primary Evidence Collection Period 1 Initial/Baseline Secondary Evidence Entry (e.g., Reading Comprehension Standard) Primary Evidence Collection Period 2 Progress Secondary Evidence There must be at least 3 weeks (21 days) between the Primary Evidence in Collection Period 1 and the Primary Evidence in Collection Period 2.

  20. GAA Portfolios Submitted Statewide

  21. What Do We Look for WhenScoring the GAA Portfolios? Evidence has been compiled, Entry Sheets have been completed, and the entries have been organized. Portfolios have undergone peer review and have been determined to be ready for submission. Binders have been packed in boxes and sent from the School to the System Test Coordinator and on to Questar. It’s time for scoring.

  22. Scoring Training Procedures Readers are trained to score portfolios using entries that have been scored during rangefinding sessions in Georgia with Georgia educators. Rangefinding is a process wherein teachers score actual student entries to set the score point ranges in each dimension (e.g., determining what it takes to get a “3” in Achievement/Progress). Entries with consensus scores are used to create training and qualifying sets for readers. Representatives from the GaDOE are involved throughout rangefinding and are on-site and/or in constant contact throughout training and scoring.

  23. Scoring Training Procedures Readers undergo 4–5 days of extensive training and must pass a series of qualifying tests to demonstrate that they know how to apply the scoring rubric before they can begin scoring. Readers are monitored throughout the scoring process to ensure they are scoring accurately and consistently. Team leaders, who serve as nonscorable experts, have previous experience in scoring the GAA and go through additional extensive training before being charged with assigning scores and nonscorable codes.

  24. Scoring GAA Portfolios are scored for 4 discrete dimensions Fidelity to Standard Context Achievement/ Progress Generalization Scoring is holistic – all pieces of evidence are considered and the totality of the information we have about the student’s achievement is used to make scoring decisions.

  25. Scoring Fidelity to Standard assesses the degree to which the student’s work addresses the grade-level standard to which it is aligned. Does the instructional activity demonstrate a clear connection to the standard and element? Is the student work focused on academic content at a very introductory level considering the student’s grade level? Is the student work focused on academic content at or approaching the student’s grade level? Does the student work address all aspects of the element?

  26. Scoring Context assesses the degree to which the student work exhibits the use of grade-appropriate materials in a purposeful and natural/real-world application. Are all the materials grade appropriate? Is the instructional activity a purposeful means through which the student can learn and demonstrate what they know and can do? Is the student working in a simulated (practice) situation? (Almost all classroom instruction is considered “simulated.”) Is the student working in a real-world (following a list to purchase groceries) or natural situation (working in the general education classroom on the same activity as general education peers)?

  27. Scoring Achievement/Progress assesses the increase in the student’s proficiency of skill across the two collection periods. Are the skills assessed across the collection periods similar enough to reliably assess progress? Is there an increase in accuracy from one collection period to another? Is there an increase in independence from one collection period to another? Is there an increase in the complexity of the tasks from one collection period to another?

  28. Scoring Generalization assesses the student’s opportunity to apply the learned skill in other settings and/or with various individuals in addition to the teacher or paraprofessional. In what meaningful settings is the student performing the activities? (The setting should be purposeful for the instructional task.) With whom and it what way is the student interacting during the standards-based instructional activity?

  29. Stages of Progress • Extending Progress – Advanced/Exceeds • Established Progress – Proficient/Meets • Emerging Progress – Basic/Does Not Meet

  30. Nonscorable Codes ME = Missing Entry • The Entry Sheet or the entry is missing; a required standard has been omitted, a required standard was addressed in previous entry. ES = Entry Sheet Error • The Entry Sheet is incomplete or incorrect. NA = Not Aligned • The tasks and/or evidence does not reflect a connection to the standard/element indicated on the Entry Sheet. IE = Insufficient Evidence • The entry does not contain evidence required for each collection period, or the student’s performance cannot be verified by the information provided.

  31. Nonscorable Codes IT = Insufficient Time • Date on Primary Evidence for collection period 2 is earlier than date on Primary Evidence for collection period 1, there is less than the minimum required time (3 weeks, 21 days) between the Primary Evidence for each collection period, or the date on evidence was prior to the administration window. OG= Off Grade • The standard selected is not at the student’s grade level. IS = Ineligible Standard • The standard selected is not eligible for assessment as required by the GAA Blueprint (Appendix D).

  32. Frequency of Nonscorables2009-10

  33. How does the GAA connect to daily practice? • Instruction should be adjusted during the school year based on student performance on the GAA and other formative assessments. • Don’t wait until reports arrive in June to reevaluate the most appropriate mode of instruction and/or assessment for the individual student.

  34. Standards and Elements Instruction and assessment should promote individual student growth through alignment to the academic content via alternate achievement standards. Alternate achievement standards are decreased in depth, breadth, and complexity, but still demonstrate a clear connection to the academic content standards.

  35. Alignment Consider alignment first and foremost when designing instructional tasks. The instructional task must be true to the standard. The task must address the distinct characteristics of the element. The task must be appropriately challenging for the individual student.

  36. What do we mean by Alignment? Alignment is the match between the written, taught, and tested curriculum.¹ In order for an instructional task to be considered aligned, it must demonstrate a clear connection to the Academic Content Standard and element being tested. 1. Diane Browder, 2006 Curriculum Standard Assessed Task Instruction

  37. Alignment to the Standard and Element Be True to the Standard The curriculum standards are the goals for instruction, learning and assessment. Achievement of the concepts and skills inherent in the elements leads to the achievement of the overall standard. Although tasks for assessment must align to the distinct aspects of the element, they must do so under the umbrella of the standard.

  38. Alignment to the Standard and Element Address the distinct characteristics of the element. What are the specific components that make-up the element ? focus on the language/terminology as written What are some prerequisite skills to give the student access to the element? Look to the GA Frameworks* for guidance to understanding the enduring concepts and essential components targeted by the standards and elements. *https://www.georgiastandards.org/Frameworks. 39

  39. Alignment Example: Standard: ELA11LSV1– The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to student, and group verbal interactions. Element: c– responds to question with appropriate information The essence of this standard is reciprocal interaction between the student and another person. The essence of the element is the response to questions. The skill assessed must demonstrate the student’s ability to respond to questions via reciprocal interaction between the student and teacher/ another student/ group. All 4 pieces of evidence must align to the standard and element. Consider the following examples:

  40. ELA11 LSV1 The student is responding to questions via his voice output device. Does this task align to the standard and element? YES

  41. Teacher annotation recognizes the requirement that the essence of the element is the reciprocal interaction. Although the student is responding to test questions. the annotation clearly states that there was no interaction. NOT ALIGNED–DO NOT USE Does this task align to the standard and element? NO. The task was completed independently with no reciprocal interaction.

  42. Alignment As teaching academic curriculum through the academic content standards and elements becomes more a part of daily instruction, lesson plans are being designed that provide access to the curriculum while still embedding the student’s IEP goals. But Alignment MUST come first!

  43. Alignment Creating instructional units and activities that can be used for multiple students is encouraged. However, the activities must be tailored to the needs and the abilities of the individual student. As such, be certain that the task is still the best choice for the individual student and that the evidence submitted clearly aligns to the academic content standard and element.

  44. Completing the Entry Sheet The Entry Sheet serves as the Table of Contents which organizes the entry. The Entry Sheet must be filled out completely and accurately in order for the entry to be scorable. An electronic version of the Entry Sheet with drop-down boxes will be available online. Instructions for completing the electronic Entry Sheet will be provided online along with the Entry Sheet.

  45. 2009-2010 GAA Entry Sheet pg. 1

  46. pg. 2

  47. Completing the Entry Sheet It is of utmost importance that the Entry Sheet be filled out completely with all required information. Dates recorded for the tasks on the Entry Sheet must match those found on the evidence. Task descriptions written on the Entry Sheet must be the same as those submitted as evidence. A Characteristic of Science must be recorded on the Science Entry Sheet and be clearly documented in the evidence. Should any of the necessary fields not be completed correctly, the entry could be nonscorable. The Entry Sheet is NOT the place to include annotations about student performance, prompting, settings, or interactions.

  48. Choosing the Appropriate Type of Evidence The type of evidence submitted should be the best means through which to demonstrate the student’s knowledge and skills. Primary Evidence must SHOW the student’s responsesduring and at the completion of the instructional activity. It is therefore vital that the type of evidence used is the appropriate choice to clearly demonstrate the student’s response. It is important that the criteria for the type of evidence has been met and that all necessary information has been documented. It is not recommended that worksheets or captioned photos be used to document “verbal” responses–this makes them more like an observation than a primary type of evidence and puts excessive burden on the teacher in their documentation.

  49. Annotating Evidence Complete and thorough documentation of evidence is critical! Incomplete or ineffective documentation can result in lower scores or in the entry being nonscorable. The student’s response must be clearly and specifically evaluated or graded. If the correctness of the student response cannot be verified, the entry will receive the Nonscorable Code of IE (Insufficient Evidence). Information regarding the nature of the task, the setting in which it was completed, any interactions that occurred during the task, and the type and frequency of prompting must be included.