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CareerBuilder / Kelly Services Discrimination Study

CareerBuilder / Kelly Services Discrimination Study

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CareerBuilder / Kelly Services Discrimination Study

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  1. CareerBuilder / Kelly Services Discrimination Study June 2007

  2. Table of Contents • Page • Objectives and Methodology 2 • Executive Summary 5 • Total Workforce 31 • Diverse Workers 51 • Non-Diverse Workers 59 • Ethnic Workers (African American, Asian and Hispanic workers) 63 • Female Workers 76 • Workers with Disabilities 91 • Age 50+ Workers 102 • GLBT Workers 113 • Demographics 125

  3. Objectives and Methodology

  4. Objectives and Methodology • OBJECTIVES • Primary objective of this research is to assess how diverse workers are treated in the workplace. • METHODOLOGY • Harris Interactive sent out invitations to a random selection of diverse and non-diverse workers to participate in the study. • The interviews took place via the Internet using targeted sample from the Harris Interactive multimillion member online panel. • Each respondent was sent a unique password and ID to ensure that the survey was only completed once. • Reminder invitations were sent to those who had not completed the study within the first few days of field start. • The survey was approximately 15 minutes in length.

  5. Objectives and Methodology • METHODOLOGY, continued • Harris Interactive interviewed 953 workers. Our goal was to attain at least n=150 workers per target group of interest. The sample sizes below contain overlap since some respondents qualified for more than one group of interest. We achieved the following: • Protected ethnicities: (n=461) • African American workers: (n=155) • Asian workers: (n=156) • Hispanic workers: (n=150) • Age (50+): (n=306) • Female workers: (n=436) • Disabled workers: (n=150) • GLBT workers: (n=155) • Non-diverse workers (Caucasian males, not GLBT, not disabled, under 50): (n=127) • The data for this research are weighted so that each diverse group is representative of itself. Also, please note that the “total workforce” data has been additionally weighted to reflect the proportion of each diverse group’s to the total workforce.

  6. Executive Summary

  7. Executive Summary, continued • OVERALL IMPRESSIONS • Members of diverse and non-diverse groups alike, feel there is at least some discriminating behavior in their workplace. • With almost a quarter of diverse workers and non-diverse workers having personally experienced some degree of discrimination based on their background at some point during their career, as well as witnessing a co-workers mistreatment. • Disabled workers report experiencing discrimination or being sensitive to another’s mistreatment, most often. • There are some diverse group workers who feel there is a disadvantage in hiring as well as lack of advancement opportunities for them based on their diverse nature. • More than half (59%) of the Disabled workers we interviewed feel their disability puts them at a distinct disadvantage when in hiring situations or in trying to advance their career. • By comparison, Asian workers are more likely than other diverse groups to cite their diverse nature is better in hiring (19%) situations.

  8. Executive Summary, continued • OVERALL IMPRESSIONS, continued • A third of all diverse workers feel they must worker harder than their co-workers without diverse backgrounds in order to gain the respect of their senior management. • Small percentages (average 11%) of Diverse workers, with the exception of disabled workers (27%), also feel their backgrounds have resulted in them being fired from their job at some point during their career. • Not surprisingly, Non-diverse workers are least likely to feel discriminated against, witness a co-workers discrimination or feel a general sense of discrimination in their workplace. • However, a quarter of this group does feel their non-diverse background leaves them with fewer opportunities to advance their career.

  9. Executive Summary, continued OVERALL IMPRESSIONS

  10. Executive Summary • TOTAL WORKFORCE • 2 out of 5 (40%) workers believe their workplace: • Mirrors the national demographics with regard to ethnicity, age, presence of disability, gender and sexual orientation. • GLBT workers are most likely to believe their workplace mirrors the national statistics (57%) while Asian workers are least likely to agree (27%). • Has an absence of diverse workers in their management structure. • African American (51%) and GLBT and Asian workers (both 48%) are most likely to agree to this statement. • 22% of all workers feel they’ve been discriminated against (based on the presence or absence of a diverse background) at some point during their career. • Nearly half of all disabled workers (44%) are likely to feel this way – higher than any other diverse subgroup. • About 1 in 6 non-diverse workers feel they’ve been discriminated against – not surprisingly, significantly lower than any of the diverse groups.

  11. Executive Summary, continued • TOTAL WORKFORCE • Among those experiencing discrimination, most (49%) report it as being “moderate.” • Among those reporting “severe” discrimination, Asian and Hispanic workers report the highest levels (26%) – followed by African American (22%), Workers age 50+ (16%) and disabled workers (11%). • The bulk of the discrimination being experienced is occurring “occasionally”. • GLBT workers report the highest levels of “regular” discrimination (60%) while just over 2 out of 5 disabled workers report being discriminated against “always/often.” • Common discriminating behaviors include: not receiving credit for work performed (53%), not having concerns addressed or taken seriously (46%), being overlooked for promotions (34%), ideas or input generally ignored (33%) and co-workers talking behind their backs (29%). • Only 27% of those who made a claim felt it was taken seriously. • While the vast majority (73%) report the offender was not held accountable, and 9% aren’t sure of the outcome.

  12. Executive Summary, continued • TOTAL WORKFORCE • Among those not reporting the discrimination they experienced, top reasons for not reporting include: 64% didn’t think it would make a difference and a third (35%) thought they would be labeled a “trouble-maker.” • Nearly one third feared they could lose their job if they reported their experiences. • When asked why those being discriminated against would stay with their current employer, most cited not being able to afford to quit (64%). • Not being able to find a comparable position (38%), or more than likely would receive same type of treatment somewhere else (39%), were also motivating factors. • Only a small percentage, 6%, ever took legal action against an employer for discrimination incurred. • When we asked all workers if they had ever witnessed an incident of a co-worker’s discrimination, 23% reported “yes.” • 36% of disabled workers report having witnessed an incident of a co-worker’s discrimination – significantly higher than any other group.

  13. Executive Summary, continued • TOTAL WORKFORCE • Among those who have witnessed someone else’s discrimination (21%), 39% reported it to someone – which is lower than those reporting their own experiences (47%). • Only 1 in 10 reported it to someone in HR, while 26% reported it to their direct supervisor. • Half felt their reporting of the incident was taken seriously, with just under a third (32%) of the offenders having been held accountable for their actions. • One quarter (24%) of those reporting incidents say they’re not sure whether the person was held accountable or not. • For those not reporting what they perceived as discrimination – prevailing themes were: not thinking it would make a difference (47%) or being afraid of being “pegged a trouble-maker” (36%). • When we asked all workers whether in the future if they saw someone else being treated unfairly/discriminated against would they say something? • 50% agreed they would - with disabled (64%), workers age 50+ (58%) and GLBT (56%) workers being the most likely to step forward on someone else’s behalf.

  14. Executive Summary, continued • TOTAL WORKFORCE • When we asked all workers who at work, if anyone, was the primary instigator of discrimination against those with diverse backgrounds… • 54% of non-diverse workers said they didn’t perceive any discrimination or unfair treatment in their workplace vs. 48% of diverse workers. • Diverse workers who felt a general sense of discrimination felt it was instigated fairly equally between co-workers (22%), direct supervisors (18%)and senior management (18%). • Non-diverse workers felt it could stem from co-workers (18%) and senior management (21%), but less likely from their direct supervisors (11%).

  15. Executive Summary, continued • DIVERSE WORKERS • Nearly three-quarters of all diverse workers at least somewhat agree that they have to work harder to gain the respect of senior management compared to their non-diverse peers – with 15% of them strongly agreeing. • African American, disabled and GLBT workers are most likely to agree – (52%, 51% and 47% strongly agree/agree, respectively). • While over half of all diverse workers don’t think the diverse nature of their background has an effect in hiring situations, 59% of all disabled workers feel it works against them. • Compared to other diverse workers, ethnic workers are nearly twice as likely as others to say their diversity helps in hiring situations. • 1 in 10 diverse workers claim they’ve everbeen fired from a job based on their diverse nature. • Disabled workers are twice as likely (27%) to have felt this type of discrimination at some point during their career. • Only 24% of diverse workers claim their company has diversity programs in place. • African American and GLBT workers report the highest instances of this.

  16. Executive Summary, continued • DIVERSE WORKERS • Among those with diversity programs, most diverse groups feel the programs have a positive impact on the work culture at the place of their employment – particularly among GLBT workers (62%). • Participation in diversity programs is enjoyed by less than half (44%). • Disabled and African American workers are the most likely (46%) to participate. • When we asked all diverse workers (regardless of whether their company has a diversity program or not) what their companies could do to improve the work culture for diverse employees, the most common answer was “nothing” (48%). • For those who thought there was something their company could do, sensitivity training was the most prevalent answer (31%), followed by having a diversity specialist in HR and cultural activities (18%).

  17. Executive Summary, continued • NON-DIVERSE WORKERS • 52% of those with a non-diverse background claim that diverse workers do get some form of preferential treatment at least occasionally. • 1 in 10 claim they are paid less than diverse co-workers which is twice as high as the 4% who claim they think they are paid more than their diverse colleagues. • Generally, non-diverse workers feel they have the same career advancement opportunities as their diverse counterparts, however, almost a quarter feel they have less of an edge where career advancement is concerned. • And 7% feel they have more opportunities than their diverse co-workers.

  18. Executive Summary, continued • ETHNIC WORKERS • The majority of ethnic workers feel they are receiving the same pay as their co-workers of similar experience and skill set who do not share their ethnicity. However: • Roughly a quarter of African-American, Asian and Hispanic workers do feel they are being paid less (25%,19%,22%). • When asked to think of their pay in terms of its relation to Caucasian workers, a third of African-American workers felt they were being paid less – while levels for Asians (23%) and Hispanics (22%) were roughly the same. • Approximately 6 out of 10 ethnic workers feel they have the same career advancement opportunities as co-workers not of their race. • However, nearly 32% of African Americans feel they have less opportunities than their Caucasian counterparts. • Asian workers report the highest levels of satisfaction (76%) with their career progress in general, compared to two-thirds of Hispanic and 55% of African American workers.

  19. Executive Summary, continued • ETHNIC WORKERS • Most ethnic workers cite having a Caucasian supervisor. • Aside from that, almost one third (28%, 27%) of African American and Asian workers claim their supervisor is of their same race – higher than Hispanic workers (16%) • The majority of ethnic workers feel they are being treated equally by their supervisor compared to their co-workers. • However, approximately 1 in 6 do believe their supervisor gives preferential treatment to their co-workers of other races. • Twelve percent of ethnic workers claim they have received a lower performance review based on their diverse nature. • This percent was consistent across ethnic groups • Nearly twice as many ethnic workers claim they have been overlooked for projects that would have provided them with more experience or increased exposure within their company (18%).

  20. Executive Summary, continued • ETHNIC WORKERS • 8 out of 10 ethnic workers say they are treated equally to others not of their race by their co-workers. • However roughly 1 in 6 African American and Asian workers feel their co-workers not of their race are treated more favorably. • While most ethnic workers believe they are being treated equally by senior management, 22% of African American, 20% of Asian and 15% of Hispanic workers feel others not of their individual races are being treated better. • Fourteen percent of ethnic workers reporting having been addressed by racial slurs in their workplace. • However, over twice as many have been subjected to racist comments or racial slurs in their presence. • Hispanic workers were most likely to cite both occurrences (15% addressed vs. 37% in their presence); and • African Americans were nearly three times as likely to be present (34%) for discriminatory language than be overtly addressed (11%) by it.

  21. Executive Summary, continued • FEMALE WORKERS • Almost half of female workers report receiving the same pay as their male co-workers who have the same types of experience and skills. • Only 5% cite being paid higher/much higher than their male counterparts. • While half (49%) of females claim they have the same career advancement opportunities as their male co-workers, almost a quarter express having fewer opportunities. • 38% of female workers are not satisfied with their career progress, overall. • Female workers who have a direct supervisor are just as likely to say their boss is male (49%) or female (46%). • About three-quarters (70%) of female workers report getting the same treatment as their male colleagues from their supervisor. • However, 17% report that their male co-workers are getting preferential treatment.

  22. Executive Summary, continued • FEMALE WORKERS • Almost one in ten female workers report having received a lower performance review some time in their career based on their gender. • Twelve percent claim they have been overlooked for projects that would have increased their visibility within the company or provided them with more experience. • 65% of female workers say they get the same type of treatment from their co-workers as their male colleagues. • Nine percent, however feel males do get some form of preferential treatment from their peers. • Roughly half (52%) of female workers say that senior management treats them equally to males. • Twenty percent say that senior management treats men more favorably.

  23. Executive Summary, continued • FEMALE WORKERS • 17% of female employees say they have experienced some form of sexual harassment during their career and they were nearly equally likely to have experienced it by a peer or supervisor. • Two out of five of those experiencing some form of sexual harassment actually reported it to someone – and were more likely to report the incident to their supervisor than to someone in senior management. • Only 1 in 10 actually reported it to someone in HR. • 72% of those reporting the incident felt their claims were taken seriously. • 45% report immediate action was taken while over a quarter had to wait for some type of resolution. • Of those who did report the offense and knew the outcome, 55% said their offender was held accountable – surprisingly, 18% said they were not sure whether their offender was made to be accountable. • And among those who experienced and reported allegations of sexual harassment, no one ever took legal action against their employer. • The vast majority (83%) thought it wouldn’t have made a difference anyway while 17% feared they would have lost their job.

  24. Executive Summary, continued • DISABLED WORKERS • Half of disabled workers report receiving equal pay as their co-workers with the same types of experience and skills that do not have a disability. • 27% report not having co-workers with the same skill set or experience. • Twenty percent of disabled workers say they have the same career advancement opportunities than their co-workers. • Over half (57%) of disabled workers are satisfied with their career progress, in general. • Almost half (44%) of disabled workers cite receiving the same treatment from their supervisor as their colleagues without disabilities. • However, 4% report that their disability affords them preferential treatment from their supervisor.

  25. Executive Summary, continued • DISABLED WORKERS • While the majority of disabled workers (51%) report not having received a lower performance review some time in their career based on their disability – 35% feel they have received this form of discrimination. • About two out of five feel they have been overlooked for projects that would have afforded them added experience or company exposure. • A majority of disabled workers say they get the same type of treatment from their co-workers as their non-disabled counterparts. • Only 2% thinks their disability provides them with preferential treatment from their peers. • 41% of disabled workers feel they are being treated less favorably than their non-disabled co-workers. • 42 percent believe senior management treats them no differently than their other colleagues.

  26. Executive Summary, continued • DISABLED WORKERS • One in four disabled employees report their company does notprovide accessible facilities that would assist them in performing their responsibilities. • And 29% also state that their company does not give enough accommodations or necessities to perform their responsibilities.

  27. Executive Summary, continued • WORKERS AGE 50+ • Approximately half (46%) of Workers age 50-61 feel their pay is comparable to their younger co-workers. • Female workers age 50-61 are almost as likely to report being paid either lower/much lower (26%) as they are to being paid higher/much higher (30%). • Male workers age 50-61 are twice as likely to report being paid higher/much higher (25%) than being paid lower/much lower (12%) than their younger colleagues. • Among the Workers age 50-61, the majority (51%) feels their advancement potential is the same as their younger co-workers. • However, male workers age 50-61 are almost twice as likely as female workers age 50-61 to cite that they have fewer opportunities. • In general, the majority of Workers age 50-61 are satisfied with their career progress (65%). • This still leaves roughly a third who have not been as satisfied with the way their career has progressed. • Regardless of gender, a large proportion of Workers age 50-61 say their direct supervisors are younger than they are. • However, males are 3.5 times more likely to have a younger supervisor than an older one.

  28. Executive Summary, continued • WORKERS AGE 50+ • For the most part, Workers age 50-61 receive the same type of treatment from their supervisor as their younger peers. • Most Workers age 50-61, regardless of gender, have not received a lower performance review based on a perceived age bias. • However, 13% of male and 6% of female Workers age 50-61 feel their age may have contributed to a lower performance evaluation at some point during their career. • The vast majority of Workers age 50-61, regardless of gender, say they get the same type of treatment from their co-workers as their younger peers. • A small percentage believes their age provides them with some favoritism compared to their younger counterparts – and men are more likely (9%) to think so than women (4%). • Most Workers age 50-61 feel senior management treats them similar to their younger colleagues. • Male Workers age 50-61, again, are more likely (14%) than females (8%) to cite that younger colleagues are getting an advantage from senior management.

  29. Executive Summary, continued • WORKERS AGE 50+ • One in three Workers age 50-61 are feeling that their responsibilities are being taken away as they approach retirement, and a quarter feel that they are getting pressure to retire early.

  30. Executive Summary, continued • GLBT WORKERS • While the majority of GLBT workers report that they’re receiving the same pay as their hetero counterparts (74%), more GLBT males (17%) than females (5%) feel their pay is lower based on their sexual orientation. • Among GLBT workers, roughly three-quarters (65%) feel their advancement potential is the same as their hetero colleagues. • No GLBT workers feel they have any advantage over hetero co-workers with regard to career advancement opportunities and almost one third (30%) feel they are at a distinct disadvantage. • About half of GLBT workers are satisfied with their career progress. More GLBT males (65%) than females (35%) are satisfied with the progress of their career, in general. • A third of GLBT males and 48% of GLBT females have shared their sexual orientation with their co-workers. • For those not sharing, females are more concerned than males that people will treat them differently – while males are more worried that their career progress could be in jeopardy if they disclosed. • Two thirds of GLBT workers who shared their sexual orientation feel it has not made a difference in how they are treated at work

  31. Executive Summary, continued • GLBT WORKERS • About 1 in 10 GLBT workers aren’t sure if other employees of the company know of their sexual orientation, while almost half say that it is common knowledge. • 83% of male and 76% of female GLBT workers claim they receive the same type of treatment from their supervisor as their hetero peers. • Roughly one out of seven GLBT workers cite having received a lower performance evaluation at some point in their career based on their sexual orientation. • Three quarters of GLBT workers do not feel they’ve been consistently overlooked for projects that would give them greater experience or exposure because of their sexual orientation. • 91% of GLBT workers, regardless of gender, say they get the same type of treatment from their co-workers as their hetero colleagues. • However, 9% do think that hetero co-workers are getting some form of preferential treatment from other co-workers. • GLBT males are three times as likely (15%) as females (5%) to report feeling senior management is more favorable to hetero colleagues. • Nearly all female GLBT workers (95%) say they are treated no differently from their hetero counterparts by senior management.

  32. Total Workforce

  33. Workplace Mirroring National Demographics • 2 out of 5 workers feel their workplace mirrors national demographics. • GLBT workers are the most likely and Asian workers are the least likely to feel their workplace fits the national average. Overall Workforce % Yes by Subgroup Q505: Do you believe your workplace mirrors national demographics?Base: All Qualified Workers (n=953); African American (n=155); Hispanic (n=150); Asian (n=156); Disabled (n=150); GLBT (n=155); Workers age 50+(n=389); Female (n=436); Non-Diverse (n=127)

  34. Absence of Diverse Workers in Management at Workplace • Half of all workers feel there is an absence of diverse workers in management where they work. • African American, Asian and GLBT workers are most likely to say there is an absence of diverse workers in management. Overall % Yes by Subgroup Q510: Do you believe there is an absence of diverse workers in management at your workplace?Base: All Qualified Workers (n=953); African American (n=155); Hispanic (n=150); Asian (n=156); Disabled (n=150); GLBT (n=155); Workers age 50+(n=306); Female (n=436); Non-Diverse (n=127)

  35. Felt Discrimination Based on Diverse/Non-Diverse Background • A little over 1 in 5 total workers feel they’ve been discriminated against based on their background. • Disabled workers, by far, are the most likely to indicate feeling they’ve been discriminated against at work. • Not surprisingly, non-diverse workers are least likely to indicate being discriminated against. Overall % Yes by Subgroup Q515: Have you ever felt discriminated against or treated unfairly in your workplace based on your/because you do not have a diverse background as defined earlier?Base: All Qualified Workers (n=953); African American (n=155); Hispanic (n=150); Asian (n=156); Disabled (n=150); GLBT (n=155); Workers age 50+(n=306); Female (n=436); Non-Diverse (n=127)

  36. Extent or Severity of Discrimination • Most workers who have experienced discrimination in the workplace state that it was “moderate.” • Though, over one quarter of Asian and Hispanic workers who report feeling discriminated against, describe it as “severe” – higher than any other diverse group. Q520: How would you describe the extent or severity of the discrimination or unfair treatment you have experienced in your workplace based on your diverse/non-diverse background as defined earlier? Base: All Qualified Workers Experiencing Discrimination (n=232); African American (n=45); Hispanic (n=44); Asian (n=33); Disabled (n=60); GLBT (n=43); Workers age 50+(n=98); Female (n=115)

  37. How Often Workers Experience Discrimination • Disabled workers have the highest level of discrimination occurring “always/often.” • By comparison, GLBT workers feel they are discriminated against “regularly.” Q525: How often do you feel you experience discrimination or are treated unfairly in your workplace based on your diverse/non-diverse background as defined above? Base: All Qualified Workers Experiencing Discrimination (n=232); African American (n=45); Hispanic (n=44); Asian (n=33); Disabled (n=60); GLBT (n=43); Workers age 50+(n=98); Female (n=115)

  38. Ways Diverse Workers Were Discriminated Against* • Common ways diverse workers were discriminated against include not being given credit for work and their concerns are not addressed or taken seriously. • Notably, more than one-third say they’re discrimination was in the form of being overlooked for a promotion. Not given credit for work Concerns are not addressed or taken seriously Overlooked for a promotion Co-workers were talking behind my back Co-workers said derogatory comments to me or in front of me Ideas or input are generally ignored Not assigned projects that will help me gain more visibility Not given the same training as other workers Workload is much heavier than others Didn’t receive a raise or bonus Was excluded from office activities or work events outside the office Schedule is inflexible or can’t get time off Other Q530: In what ways did you feel you were discriminated against or treated unfairly in your workplace because of your/you do not have a diverse background as defined earlier? Base: Diverse Workers Who Felt Discriminated Against (n=197); *Non-Diverse Workers sample size too low to analyze (n=16)

  39. Diverse Workers Reporting Discrimination Personally Experienced* • The majority of diverse workers experiencing discrimination say they’ve never reported it. • Among those who have reported it, direct supervisors were confided in most often. 50% Net Yes Q535: Did you report the discrimination or unfair treatment you feel you experienced to your direct supervisor, HR or other authority within your workplace? Base: Diverse Workers Who Felt Discriminated Against (n=195); * Non-Diverse workers sample size too small to analyze

  40. Report of Discrimination Taken Seriously • Only 30% of diverse workers felt their claims of discrimination were taken seriously. • And among those, 1 in 10 said the something was done immediately. 30% Q540: Did you feel the authority figure in your workplace to whom you reported the incident(s) took the allegation(s) of discrimination or unfair treatment seriously? Base: Diverse Workers Who Reported the Incident of Discrimination (n=85)

  41. Offender Held Accountable • 7 percent of diverse workers having reported incidents of discrimination are not sure whether or not the offender was ever held accountable. • The vast majority report that the offender was not punished for their behavior. Q545: Was the offender held accountable? Base: Diverse Workers Who Reported the Incident of Discrimination (n=85)

  42. Reason(s) For Not Reporting Incident • The majority of diverse workers who did not report their incidents of discrimination did not do so because they felt it just wouldn’t have made a difference. • Over one-third did not want to be branded a trouble-maker; and • 1 in 3 felt they may lose their job if they reported the incident(s). Q550: Why didn’t you report the incident? Base: Diverse Workers Who Didn’t Report the Incident of Discrimination (n=112)

  43. Factors Motivating Discriminating Workers to Stay With Employer • Those who have experienced discrimination say they stay with their current employer mostly because they cannot financially afford to quit. • More than one-third feel they wouldn’t be able to get a comparable job somewhere else; and • If they got a new job, they feel they would experience the same type of discrimination there too. Q555: Since you feel you have experienced discrimination or been treated unfairly in your workplace because of your diverse/non-diverse background as defined earlier, what factors are motivating you to stay with your current employer? Base: Workers Having Felt Discrimination (n=213)

  44. Took Legal Action Against Employer For Discrimination • Only 5% of diverse workers who feel they’ve been discriminated against have taken legal action toward their employer. • Hispanic workers were the most likely to have taken legal action compared to other diverse groups. Overall % Yes by Subgroup Q560: Have you ever taken legal action against your employer for what you considered to be discrimination against you or unfair treatment based on your diverse/non-diverse background as defined earlier? Base: Workers Having Felt Discrimination (n=213); African American (n=43); Hispanic (n=37); Asian (n=31); Disabled (n=58); GLBT (n=43); Workers age 50+(n=66); Female (n=104); Non-Diverse (n=18)

  45. Witnessed Discrimination of Co-Worker(s) • 1 in 5 total workers claim they’ve witnessed a co-worker being discriminated against at their workplace. • Compared to other diverse groups, disabled workers are the most likely to cite having witnessed a co-workers discrimination. Overall % Yes by Subgroup Q565: Have you ever witnessed what you perceived as discrimination against or unfair treatment of one of your co-workers based on their diverse background as defined earlier? Base: All Qualified Workers (n=953) African American (n=155); Hispanic (n=150); Asian (n=156); Disabled (n=150); GLBT (n=155); Workers age 50+(n=306); Female (n=436); Non-Diverse (n=127)

  46. Reporting Discrimination of Co-Workers Witnessed • Among those witnessing a co-workers discrimination, 26% have reported the behavior to their direct supervisor. • Only 9% have reported the incident to someone in HR. 39% Net Yes Q570: Did you report the allegation(s) of discrimination or unfair treatment of your co-worker to your direct supervisor, HR or other authority within your workplace? Base: Workers Witnessing Co-Workers Discrimination (n=239)

  47. Report of Discrimination Taken Seriously • Half of those who have reported a co-workers discrimination felt their concerns were taken seriously. • Only a little over 1 in 10 got achieved immediate response. 51% Q575: Did you feel the authority figure in your workplace to whom you reported the incident(s) took the allegation(s) of discrimination or unfair treatment seriously? Base: Workers Who Reported Allegations of Co-workers Discrimination (n=93)

  48. Offender Held Accountable • Almost, one quarter of those reporting the incident(s) aren’t sure whether or not the offender was held accountable; and • One third, were held accountable with 1 in 10 knowing the individual was fired as a result. 32% Q580: Was the offender held accountable? Base: Workers Who Reported the Allegations of Discrimination (n=93)

  49. Reason(s) For Not Reporting Incident Involving Co-Worker • Most of those who did not report allegations of a co-workers discrimination did not think it would make a difference. • Over one-third also cite they were afraid to be labeled a “trouble-maker.” Q585: Why didn’t you report the incident involving your co-worker? Base: Workers Who Did Not Report Allegations of a Co-workers Discrimination (n=146)

  50. Reporting Discrimination in the Future • In the future, only half of all workers claim that they would report incidents of a co-worker’s discrimination. • Disabled workers and Workers age 50+ are the most likely to step forward on someone else’s behalf. Overall % Yes by Subgroup Q590: If you ever encountered/in the future you encounter an incident where you felt that your co-worker was being discriminated against or treated unfairly at work because of their diverse background as defined earlier, would you report it to HR? Base: All Qualified Workers (n=953); African American (n=155); Hispanic (n=150); Asian (n=156); Disabled (n=150); GLBT (n=155); Workers age 50+(n=306); Female (n=436); Non-Diverse (n=127)