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Status of Product Stewardship in the United States PowerPoint Presentation
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Status of Product Stewardship in the United States

Status of Product Stewardship in the United States

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Status of Product Stewardship in the United States

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  1. Status of Product Stewardshipin the United States Scott Cassel, Executive Director/Founder Product Stewardship Institute, Inc.

  2. Steering and Technical Committees

  3. What is the Product Stewardship Institute? • Non-Profit, based in Boston, founded in 2000 • Membership • 45 State governments • Over 100 Local governments • Over 50 Partners • (Business, Environmental/Organizations) • Board of Directors: 7 states, 4 local agencies • Multi-stakeholder product stewardship network

  4. Why was the Product Stewardship Institute Created? • Unified voice State and Local Governments • Fiscal relief for government on waste issues • Objective data for decision-making • Forum for collaboration with industry • Nationally coordinated systems/harmonized regulations

  5. PSI Projects • Electronics • Paint • Fluorescent Lamps • Mercury Thermostats • Pharmaceuticals • Medical Sharps • Telephone books • Batteries • Radioactive Devices • Gas Cylinders • Tires • Beverage containers • Packaging • Motor oil • Pesticides

  6. What is Product Stewardship? “Product Stewardship" is a principle that directs all those involved in the life cycle of a product to take shared responsibility for reducing the health and environmental impacts that result from the production, use, and end-of-life management of the product.

  7. Building Capacity for Product Stewardship: Conceptually • “Product stewardship” (paradigm shift) • Unfunded mandate – impacts on local government • Internalize costs of managing products • Producer responsibility within context of shared responsibility • Lifecycle approach (design through end of life)

  8. Building Capacity for Product Stewardship: State by State

  9. PSI State Members – 2004

  10. PSI State Members – 2009

  11. PSI Principles of Product Stewardship (2001) • Cost internalization • Shared responsibility (manufacturers have greatest role to play – producer responsibility) • Lifecycle costs • Performance goals • Flexibility for producers • Endorsements : ECOS, NWPSC, SWANA, NERC, NAHMMA, PSC (Australia), CRRA, CRA, etc.

  12. Building Capacity for Product Stewardship: Statute by Statute

  13. State EPR Laws 2004

  14. State EPR Laws 2009

  15. 2009 Product Stewardship Legislation • Electronics • Thermostats • Fluorescent lamps • Pharmaceuticals • Phone books • Paint • Medical sharps • Framework (CA and OR)

  16. Building Capacity for Product Stewardship: Council by Council • Northwest • California • Vermont • Texas • Midwest • New York

  17. Building Capacity for Product Stewardship: Local Government by Local Government

  18. Product Stewardship Institute State & Local Membership – FY08/FY09

  19. Results Sought • Save money for local government • Greater environmental protection

  20. Results Sought • End-of-life management costs included into company’s cost of doing business (may be reflected in product purchase price) • Product design changes • Cost shift: Gov’t (ratepayers or taxpayers )  mfrs/consumers • No advanced recycling fees or end-of-life fees • Cover costs of collection, transportation, recycling/disposal • Drive cost efficiencies in product end-of-life management

  21. Manufacturers Working with PSI • PAINT:Benjamin Moore, Sherwin Williams, Valspar, NPCA, etc. • ELECTRONICS: Dell, HP, Sony, Panasonic, Sharp, LG Electronics, Consumer Electronics Assoc. (CEA), Information Technology Industry Council (ITI), etc. • THERMOSTATS: Honeywell, White Rodgers, GE, Thermostat Recycling Corp. • FLUORESCENT LAMPS: Osram-Sylvania, Philips, GE, National Electrical Manufacturers Assoc. (NEMA)

  22. Manufacturers Working with PSI • PHARMACEUTICALS: King, Novo-Nordisk, Sanofi-Aventis, Pfizer, Astrazeneca, GlaxoSmithKline , Roche, etc. • MEDICAL SHARPS: Becton Dickinson, Covidien, UltiMed, Owen Mumford, etc. • PHONE BOOKS: AT&T, Dex, Yellow Pages Assoc., Assoc. of Directory Publishers • GAS CYLINDERS: Worthington Cylinder, Manchester Tank, etc.

  23. Manufacturers’ Transformative Process • “There is no problem” • “Increase government programs” • “I’m OK w/visible fee (gov’t made us do it)” • “We take responsibility to set up program” • “Performance is not my responsibility”

  24. Framing the Debate You Can’t Pull a Flower to Make it Grow Gilles Goddard, Director General La Société de gestion des huiles usagées (SOGHU) Producer ResponsibilityOrganization for UsedOil Recycling

  25. Voluntary vs. Legislated Solutions • Leverage • Political will • The Times they are a Changin’

  26. Role of Voluntary Systems • Interim steps prior to legislation • Address larger sustainability issues • Allows for industry sector leaders to emerge • Allows industry sector to advance interests if low government priority

  27. Role of Regulated Systems • Level the playing field (Fair) • Gives authority to agency to enforce against those non-compliant • Gives authority to agency to enhance program • Expresses clear will of government

  28. PSI Process of Stakeholder Engagement • Research (“you’ve been heard/building trust”) • Interviews/project summary • Action Plan • Meetings  Agreements (“progress is possible”) • Projects (“tangible results”) • Evaluate/adjust program (“we’re not going away”)

  29. Benefits of Dialogue • Better information for all stakeholders • Better understanding of stakeholder positions • Better understanding of problem, focus, key issues and possible solutions • Opportunity for consensus on some/all issues • Opportunity for best/sustainable solutions • Identification of projects and initiatives that are key to resolving an issue • Business opportunities

  30. Basic Challenges • Lack of awareness about problem/solutions • Lack of infrastructure to manage products • Lack of incentives to change behavior • Lack of metrics to measure performance/progress • Lack of funding to address problems

  31. Key Successes • Capacity has been built in the U.S. for Product Stewardship • An educated government (45 states/100 locals as PSI members + many other involved local governments) • A partially educated manufacturing sector (product specific) • Retailers starting to step into their role • States beginning to gain experience with PS laws • 19 state electronics laws • 7 state thermostat laws • States with auto switch laws and battery laws

  32. Key Successes • Increase in product stewardship legislation in 2009 • Greater national environmental group participation in product stewardship (NRDC, Sierra Club, Clean Water Action) • Movement from product-by-product legislation to framework • Realizing benefits for local government • Gov’t cost savings (MN: $6 million/yr on paint alone) • Jobs/economic development • GHG emissions reductions • More products/tons of toxics collected (take-back)

  33. Key Challenges • How do we define and measure product stewardship success? • 2. What polices will result in greatest product design changes? • 3. How can we achieve change quicker, cheaper, and still be sustainable (over time)? • 4. What policies will most reduce product lifecycle impacts • (vs. solely end-of-life)? • 5. What role does chemicals policy play in product stewardship programs?

  34. Sustainability by Design by John Ehrenfeld • “Sustainability is the possibility that human and other life will flourish on the planet forever.” • Enhanced appreciation of Being • Not Sustainable Development • Find ways to snap out of our current path • Toilet two button flush • Prius miles per gallon real-time monitor

  35. Abraham Isaac Kook • Chief Rabbi of Jaffa, Palestine (1904-1919) • Chief Rabbi of Jewish Community in Palestine (1918-1935) • Introduction by Ben Zion Bokser

  36. PSI Staff • Lisa Gould, Executive Assistant • Jennifer Nash, Director – Policy and Programs • Sierra Fletcher, Associate – Policy and Programs • Gena Folts, Development Associate • Bill Honohan, Business Manager • David Boucher, Intern • Scott Cassel, Executive Director

  37. Current PSI Board of Directors • Terms expire on June 30, 2009 • State #1: Frank Coolick – formerly with NJ Department of Environmental Protection (Vice President) • State #2: Shirley Willd-Wagner – CA Integrated Waste Management Board • State #3: Scott Mouw – NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources • State #4: Jan Whitworth – OR Department of Environmental Quality • Local #1: Mollie Mangerich - Sonoma County Waste Management Agency, CA • Local #2: Scott Klag – Metro Regional Government, OR Terms expire on June 30, 2010 State #1: Jack Price – FL Department of Environmental Protection (Treasurer) State #2: Tom Metzner - CT Department of Environmental Protection State #3: Theresa Stiner - IA Department of Natural Resources Local #1: Dave Galvin - King County, WA (President) Local #2: Jen Holliday - Chittenden County, VT (Clerk)

  38. New PSI Board of DirectorsJuly 1, 2009 • Terms expire on June 30, 2011 • State #1: Resa Dimino – NY Department of Environmental Protection • State #2: Ann Pistell – ME Department of Environmental Protection • State #3: Scott Mouw – NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources • State #4: Becky Jayne – IL Environmental Protection Agency • Local #1: Mollie Mangerich - Sonoma County Waste Management Agency, CA • Local #2: Scott Klag – Metro Regional Government, OR Terms expire on June 30, 2010 State #1: Jack Price – FL Department of Environmental Protection State #2: Tom Metzner - CT Department of Environmental Protection State #3: Theresa Stiner - IA Department of Natural Resources Local #1: Dave Galvin - King County, WA Local #2: Jen Holliday - Chittenden County, VT