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The Little Prince written and illustrated by Antoine de Saint Exupéry PowerPoint Presentation
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The Little Prince written and illustrated by Antoine de Saint Exupéry

The Little Prince written and illustrated by Antoine de Saint Exupéry

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The Little Prince written and illustrated by Antoine de Saint Exupéry

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  1. The Little Prince written and illustrated byAntoine de Saint Exupéry

  2. The Little Prince written and illustrated byAntoine de Saint Exupéry

  3. The Little Prince written and illustrated byAntoine de Saint Exupéry

  4. Planning for an Inclusive and Engaging Curriculum Social Competence Communication Thinking Contructivism Learning Styles Metacognition Esther Weichert

  5. The curriculum planning tool I will present to you today: • scaffolds teachers’ understanding of inclusive and constructivist curriculum • provides a tool kit for effective teaching and learning • facilitates the implementation of the Victorian Essential Learning Standards and the Principles of Teaching and Learning.

  6. Inclusive Curriculum Planning Tool:An overview There are two explicit components to this planning tool: Communication in Learning Thinking in Learning The choice of the specific pedagogy will be guided by the demands of the learning focus and PoLT.

  7. Learning environment where: • Learning is constructed in a collaborative and cooperative manner, supporting personal and interpersonal development. • Thinking is infused in all aspects of the learning • Knowledge of learning styles promotes the use of rich pedagogy. • Intelligent behaviours underpin a sustainable learning environment and promote life long learning.

  8. The Four Literacy Roles of the Learner. • Freebody and Luke (1990) suggest four roles that an effective learner needs tobe equipped with:

  9. Code-breaking: knowing about and using the relationship of spoken sounds to the graphic and visual symbols used to represent those sounds (including punctuation and formatting conventions). This includes: • recognising and using the alphabet, sounds in words, whole words, letter/sound relationships; • spelling accurately and understanding the functions of spelling; • recognising and using grammar and vocabulary including punctuation and intonation; • recognising and creating patterns of letters, sounds, words, clauses, sentence and text structures.

  10. Meaning-making:knowing about and using the meanings conveyed by written, spoken, visual or multi-modal texts (including vocabulary and clause meanings and the conventions and components of various genres). This includes: • drawing on prior knowledge to construct meaning from texts; • comparing one’s own experiences with those described in the text; • interpretingand using literal and inferential meanings of words, clauses, sentences and texts; • understanding the way texts are constructed to make meaning.

  11. Text-using: knowing about and using the functions of various text types, across all learning contexts (including the audience-purpose-form relationships of various genres and the social and cultural expectations associated with different forms of communication). This includes: • understanding that different cultural and socialcontextsshape the way texts are structured, their tone and degree of formality; • using appropriate text types for particular purposes both inside and outside school; • recognising that each text type has particularstructures and features; • understanding the options involved in using a text to convey particular meanings effectively.

  12. Text-analysing: (Critical Literacy) knowing about and using the cultural and ideological bases on which texts are produced and used (including how texts influence and position readers, and listeners). This includes: • recognising the author or speaker's purposein creating a text; • understanding that texts influence people's ideas; • recognising opinions, bias and points of view in a text; • understanding how texts are crafted according to the views and interests of their authors; • identifying the ways in which information or ideas are expressed to influence readers’ or listeners’ perceptions; • deciding to endorse the position taken by a text or presenting an alternative position.

  13. BLOOM’S REVISED TAXONOMYCreatingGenerating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing thingsDesigning, constructing, planning, producing, inventing.EvaluatingJustifying a decision or course of actionChecking, hypothesising, critiquing, experimenting, judging AnalysingBreaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationshipsComparing, organising, deconstructing, interrogating, findingApplyingUsing information in another familiar situationImplementing, carrying out, using, executingUnderstandingExplaining ideas or conceptsInterpreting, summarising, paraphrasing, classifying, explainingRememberingRecalling informationRecognising, listing, describing, retrieving, naming, finding Higher-order thinking

  14. Remembering The learner is able to recall, restate and remember learned information. • Recognising • Listing • Describing • Identifying • Retrieving • Naming • Locating • Finding   Can you recall information?

  15. Teacher roles Directs Tells Shows Examines Questions Evaluates Student roles Responds Absorbs Remembers Recognises Memorises Defines Describes Retells Passive recipient Classroom Roles for Remembering

  16. Understanding The learner grasps the meaning of information by interpreting and translating what has been learned. • Interpreting • Exemplifying • Summarising • Inferring • Paraphrasing • Classifying • Comparing • Explaining   Can you explain ideas or concepts?

  17. Teacher roles Demonstrates Listens Questions Compares Contrasts Examines Student roles Explains Describes Outlines Restates Translates Demonstrates Interprets Active participant Classroom Roles for Understanding

  18. Applying The learner makes use of information in a context different from the one in which it was learned. • Implementing • Carrying out • Using • Executing  Can you use the information in another familiar situation?

  19. Teacher roles Shows Facilitates Observes Evaluates Organises Questions Student roles Solves problems Demonstrates use of knowledge Calculates Compiles Completes Illustrates Constructs Active recipient Classroom Roles for Applying

  20. Analysing The learner breaks learned information into its parts to best understand that information. • Comparing • Organising • Deconstructing • Attributing • Outlining • Finding • Structuring • Integrating Can you break information into parts to explore understandings and relationships?

  21. Teacher roles Probes Guides Observes Evaluates Acts as a resource Questions Organises Dissects Student roles Discusses Uncovers Argues Debates Thinks deeply Tests Examines Questions Calculates Investigates Inquires Active participant Classroom Roles for Analysing

  22. Evaluating The learner makes decisions based on in-depth reflection, criticism and assessment. • Checking • Hypothesising • Critiquing • Experimenting • Judging • Testing • Detecting • Monitoring Can you justify a decision or course of action?

  23. Teacher roles Clarifies Accepts Guides Student roles Judges Disputes Compares Critiques Questions Argues Assesses Decides Selects Justifies Active participant Classroom Roles for Evaluating

  24. Creating The learner creates new ideas and information using what has been previously learned. • Designing • Constructing • Planning • Producing • Inventing • Devising • Making  Can you generate new products, ideas, or ways of viewing things?

  25. Teacher roles Facilitates Extends Reflects Analyses Evaluates Student roles Designs Formulates Plans Takes risks Modifies Creates Proposes Active participant Classroom Roles for Creating

  26. How does it all fit together? Literacy / Communication Multiple Intelligences/ Smarts Thinking Skills/Tools Preferred Learning Styles Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy L & HOT Thinker's Keys Six Hats-DATT

  27. A good teacher makes you think even when you don’t want to. (Fisher, 1998, Teaching Thinking)

  28. REMEMBERING Recognise, list, describe, identify, retrieve, name …. Can the student RECALL information What thinking strategies/tools will assist learners to REMEMBER? Code Breaker Bloom’s Taxonomy: Lower order thinking knowing about and using the relationship of spoken sounds to the graphic and visual symbols used to represent those sounds

  29. UNDERSTANDING Interpret, exemplify, summarise, infer, paraphrase ….. Can the student EXPLAIN ideas or concepts? What thinking strategies / tools will assist learners to EXPLAIN? Meaning Maker understanding the way texts are constructed to make meaning.

  30. APPLYING Implement, carry out, use … Can the student USE the new knowledge in another familiar situation? What thinking strategies / tools will assist learners to USE new knowledge?? Text user understanding the options involved in using a text to convey particular meanings effectively

  31. Higher Order thinking ANALYSING Compare, attribute, organise, deconstruct … Can the student DIFFERENTIATE between constituent parts? EVALUATING Check, critique, judge, hypothesise ... Can the student JUSTIFY a decision or course of action? CREATING Design, construct, plan, produce ... Can the student GENERATE new products, ideas or ways of viewing things? Text-analyst:(Critical Literacy)knowing about and using the cultural and ideological bases on which texts are produced and used (including how texts influence and position readers, and listeners). deciding to endorse the position taken by a text or presenting an alternative position.

  32. Bloom’s Taxonomy, Literacy, and The Knowledge Dimension

  33. He who learns but does not think is lost (Chinese Proverb)