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Common Core Institute #2 Assessment Literacy

Common Core Institute #2 Assessment Literacy

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Common Core Institute #2 Assessment Literacy

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  1. Common Core Institute #2Assessment Literacy

  2. Agenda • Welcome • Announcements and Introductions • Introduction to Assessment • Assessment Types • Assessment System • Break • Technical Quality • Assessment and Accountability • Building an Assessment Plan • Lunch • Q & A/Closing Remarks/Announcements

  3. What is ASSESSMENT? • The systematic collection, review and use of information about educational programs to improve student learning (Palomba & Banta) • A process embedded within larger systems in a school/district/state • Noun: tools and strategies used to collect evidence (Heritage & Herman) • Verb: process of using evidence to improve decision-making (Heritage & Herman)

  4. Purpose • Assessments are always developed with purpose in mind: • What is to be assessed? • Why is assessment taking place? • How will student learning be measured? • How will the results of the assessment be used?

  5. Types of Assessment • Summative Assessment • Interim Assessment • Formative Assessment

  6. Tiers of Assessment Wide Summative Scope and Duration Interim (instructional, evaluative, predictive) Formative (minute-by-minute, integrated into the lesson) Narrow Less Often More Often Frequency of Administration Adapted from Perie et al.(2009) and Talbot (2011)

  7. Summative Assessments • Given once at end of a longer period of time • Are typically large scale assessments, which are given state wide or nationally, but may be district wide or semester exams • Generally used to evaluate performance against a defined set of content standards (ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING--Stiggins, Arter, Chauppuis and Chauppuis , 2006)

  8. Summative Assessments • Can meaningfully aggregate/disaggregate and report results • Use results for accountability and policy information • Least flexible

  9. Interim Assessments • Fall between formative and summative assessments • Given periodically throughout the year or course • Are typically medium-scale assessments, which are given at the district or school level • Generally used to evaluate performance against a defined set of content standards (ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING--Stiggins, Arter, Chauppuis and Chauppuis , 2006)

  10. Interim Assessments • Can meaningfully aggregate/disaggregate and report results • Use results for program evaluation, resource allocation, and instructional information on past practice • More flexible than summative

  11. Formative Assessment • Occurs moment-to-moment as part of instruction • Is a process used by teachers and students frequently and is embedded in the current unit of instruction • Are small scale, short cycle assessments given in the classroom to diagnose where students are in their learning (ASSESSMENT FORLEARNING--Stiggins, Arter, Chauppuis and Chauppuis, 2006)

  12. Formative Assessment • Cannot aggregate/disaggregate and report results • Use results to provide descriptive feedback or to modify instruction • Most flexible

  13. Formative Assessment Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievements of intended instructional outcomes (FAST SCASS, October 2006)

  14. Five Critical Features to Guide Educators Toward Effective Use of Formative Assessment • Learning Progressions – clearly articulates the trajectory along which students are expected to progress • Learning Goals and Success Criteria – immediate goals to be learned • Descriptive Feedback – ideas, strategies, and tasks students can use to close the “gap” between his or her current learning level and the next level Heritage, M. Formative Assessment and Next-Generation Assessment Systems: Are We Losing an Opportunity. National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST).

  15. Five Critical Features to Guide Educators Toward Effective Use of Formative Assessment • Self and Peer Assessment – Students evaluate their own learning and their peers learning based upon a success criteria • Collaboration – All participants share responsibility for learning Heritage, M. Formative Assessment and Next-Generation Assessment Systems: Are We Losing an Opportunity. National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST).

  16. Formative Assessment Cycle Heritage, M. Formative Assessment and Next-Generation Assessment Systems: Are We Losing an Opportunity. National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST).

  17. What are the major differences aMONG the assessment types?

  18. Dimensions of Assessment Adapted from Talbot (2011)

  19. The Assessment System

  20. Comprehensive Assessment System • Consists of three types of assessments • Summative • Interim • Formative • Assessment of learning and assessment for learning

  21. Assessment System

  22. Assessments in the Assessment System Learning Goals/Progressions Herman, J. & Heritage, M. Assessment Systems That Work. Joint Presentation sponsored by the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST)and Assessment and Accountability Comprehensive Center (AACC).

  23. The Three C’s • Comprehensiveness • Coherence • Continuity Pellegrino, J., Chudowsky, N. & Glaser, R. Knowing What Students Know. National Research Council.

  24. Building Complementary Assessment System • Role of Classroom Assessment • Role of District Assessment • Role of State Assessment

  25. Role of Classroom Assessment • Monitor ongoing progress • Make ongoing adjustments • Adapting and responding to learning needs • Use different teaching methods • Use different teaching materials Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  26. Role of District Assessment For Districts For Schools Set school improvement goals Determine staffing needs Guide instructional changes Guide professional development • Monitor progress • Identify needed changes in: • policies/procedures • funding • school organization • Guide curriculum changes • Guide professional development Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  27. Role of State Assessment For States For Districts Monitor standards Anchor district standards and assessments Guide changes in: board rules policies and funding organizational structures Monitor school improvement efforts • Monitor standards • Monitor equity of opportunity • Guide changes in: • laws and regulations • policies and funding • organizational structures • Set improvement goals • Guide professional development Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  28. Break:We will return in 15 minutes

  29. Technical Quality

  30. Why does technical quality matter? • Test construction • Test administration • Usefulness of results • Credibility • Accuracy of score interpretation • Sound basis for adjusting instruction Adapted from Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  31. Assessment Design and Format • Items, tasks, strategies, rubrics must be purposely designed to serve purpose • Various assessment formats and contexts: • Paper-pencil, performance • Selected, constructed, extended response • Formal “tests,” analysis of work, homework • Format does NOT = quality • Good assessments DO well serve their purpose(s) Herman, J. & Heritage, M. Assessment Systems That Work. Joint Presentation sponsored by the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST)and Assessment and Accountability Comprehensive Center (AACC).

  32. Credibility • Valid and reliable for purpose intended • Ensuring fairness and eliminating bias

  33. Validity and Reliability • Validity is measuring what is intended to be measured and using data to make accurate inferences. • Reliability is consistency of test results from one test to another, from one part to another, from one time to another, and from one score to another. Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  34. Bias and Fairness • Bias is giving or not giving an advantage to one group or another. • Fairness refers to the purposes and uses of tests in ways that are clearly communicated, ethical, and valid for all students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills. Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  35. Accommodations and Validity • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Section 300.160(b)--Accommodation guidelines • (1) A State (or, in the case of a district-wide assessment, an LEA) must develop guidelines for the provision of appropriate accommodations. • (2) The State's (or, in the case of a district-wide assessment, the LEA's) guidelines must: • (i) Identify only those accommodations for each assessment that do not invalidate the score; and • (ii) Instruct IEP Teams to select, for each assessment, only those accommodations that do not invalidate the score. • Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title I Section 200.2(b)(2) requires that a State’s assessment system be designed to be valid and accessible for use with the widest possible range of students, including students with disabilities and students with limited English proficiency.

  36. Dos and Don’ts When Selecting Accommodations Thompson, S., Morse, A., Sharpe, M. & Hall, S. Accommodations Manual: How to Select, Administer, and Evaluate Use of Accommodations for Instruction and Assessment of Students with Disabilities. Council of Chief State School Officers, Assessing Special Education Students State Collaborative.

  37. Dos and Don’ts When Selecting Accommodations Thompson, S., Morse, A., Sharpe, M. & Hall, S. Accommodations Manual: How to Select, Administer, and Evaluate Use of Accommodations for Instruction and Assessment of Students with Disabilities. Council of Chief State School Officers, Assessing Special Education Students State Collaborative.

  38. Accuracy of Score Interpretation • Use results based on the design and intended use of assessment • Avoid overinterpretation/misuse of results • Factors affecting trend lines: change in test blueprint; change in content standards; change in scale; change in cut scores; change in student population Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  39. What is the relationship between the assessment system and accountability?

  40. Accountability System • Data system for reporting selected pieces of data about student learning and factors affecting learning to determine success of the educational system • Used as means of holding schools and their supports (district, state, legislation, policies, procedures, practices, funding) accountable for how well students are learning • Assessment is one part of the accountability system Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  41. Accountability System

  42. Tiers of Accountability Adapted from Sheinker, J. & Redfield, D. Handbook for Professional Development in Assessment Literacy. Council of Chief State School Officers, Comprehensive Assessment Systems State Collaborative.

  43. Building an assessment plan

  44. Sample Assessment PlanCentral Bucks School District, Doylestown, PA

  45. Sample Assessment PlanCentral Bucks School District, Doylestown, PA

  46. Sample Assessment Plan

  47. Sample Assessment Plan

  48. Sample Assessment Plan