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Learning Style and Intelligence

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  1. Learning Style and Intelligence Chapter 3

  2. What is learning style?

  3. Your learning style is your learning preference.How do you like tolearn?

  4. Knowing about your learning style helps you to: • Be more productive at school and on the job • Increase achievement • Be more creative • Improve problem solving • Make better decisions • Learn more effectively

  5. Learning Style • Visual • Auditory • Kinesthetic/Tactile

  6. Learning Style Memory Exercise • 15 items will be passed around. Can you remember them?

  7. How did you remember the items? Did you remember what you could see, feel, hear or touch? What is your strongest preference?

  8. Learning Style Exercise: The Paper Airplane

  9. What worked best for you? • Auditory • Visual • Or kinesthetic?

  10. Visual Learners • Learn through seeing and reading • Prefer written directions • Often good readers

  11. Visual Learners Learn Best With: • pictures • illustrations • photos • graphs • diagrams • maps

  12. Visual Learning Techniques • Mental photograph or video • Flash cards • Highlighting • Draw pictures to remember • Use pictures or symbols in the margin to remember • Draw a map or outline

  13. Auditory Learners • Learn through listening and talking • Remember what they hear better than what they see

  14. Auditory Learners: • Prefer to listen to instructions • Often like to talk on the phone or listen to music • Learn best if they can hear and see the assignment

  15. Auditory Learning Techniques • Discuss what you have learned withothers • Participate in study groups • Recite aloud • Teach others what you have learned • Use flash cards and say the items • Use music in the background if it does not distract you or use it as a break from studying

  16. Kinesthetic/Tactile Learners • Learn through doing • Remember hands on activities • Use their hands to build, create, plant, draw or decorate

  17. Kinesthetic/Tactile Learners: • Learn the assignment best by using physical activity

  18. Kinesthetic/Tactile Learning Techniques • Read while walking or pacing • Study outside when practical • Take notes on lectures • Highlight or underline • Write summaries • Outline chapters • Think of practical applications

  19. How does learning style affect career choice? For example, an architect would probably have a strong preference for visual learning. What would be the common learning preferences for most athletes?

  20. Activity: Complete the Learning Style Quiz in the Textbook

  21. Brainstorm: Learning Techniques • Four groups: • Auditory • Visual • Tactile/kinesthetic • Combination types • What learning techniques match these preferences? Write them on the board.

  22. Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS) • Elements of learning style • Environmental • Emotional • Sociological • Physical Notice how these factors affect productivity at school as well as on the job.

  23. Environmental • Sound • Light • Temperature • Design (formal or informal)

  24. Emotional • Motivation • Persistence • Structure

  25. Alone/peer Authority Independent learning Online learning Instructor guided learning Face to face courses Sociological

  26. Physical • Auditory • Visual • Tactile • Kinesthetic • Intake • Time of day • Mobility

  27. How do these factors affect productivity at school and on the job?

  28. Written Exercise • Understanding your Peps Learning Style Inventory • What is your ideal environment for learning and working?

  29. Your Personality and Your Learning Style

  30. For review, what is your personality type? • Extravert or Introvert? • Sensing or Intuitive? • Thinking or Feeling? • Judging or Perceptive?

  31. Learning Strategies for Different Personality Types

  32. Extraverts • Learn best when in action • Value physical activity • Like to study with others

  33. Extravert • Learn by talking. • Discuss what you have learned with others. • Like variety and action. Take frequent breaks and do something active.

  34. Caution! • Extraverts can get so distracted by activity and socialization that the studying does not get done.

  35. Introverts • Learn best by pausing to think • Value reading • Prefer to study individually • Need quiet for concentration

  36. Introvert • Find a quiet place to study by yourself. • Plan to study for longer periods of time so you can concentrate. • Find places with minimal distractions such as the library. • Turn off the phone.

  37. Caution! This type may miss out on sharing ideas with others and the fun and social life of college.

  38. Sensing • Seeks specific information • Memorizes facts • Values what is practical • Follows instructions • Likes hands-on experience • Wants clear assignments

  39. Sensing • Good at mastering facts and details. • Think about practical applications to motivate yourself. • Ask, “How can I use this.”

  40. Caution! This type may miss the big picture or general outline by focusing too much on the facts and details. Make a general outline to see the relationship and meaning of the facts.

  41. INtuitive • Seeks quick insights • Uses imagination to go beyond the facts • Values what is original • Likes theories • Reads between the lines • Independent thinkers

  42. INtuitive • Good at learning concepts and theories • Ask yourself, “What is the main point?”

  43. Caution! • Since this type focuses on general concepts and theories, they are likely to miss the details and facts. To learn the details, organize them into broad categories that have meaning for you.

  44. Thinking • Wants objective material to study • Logic guides learning • Likes to critique new ideas • Finds flaws in an argument • Learns by challenge and debate • Wants logical presentations

  45. Thinking • Thinking types are good at logic. • Ask yourself, “What do I think of these ideas?” • Debate or discuss your ideas with others. • Allow time to think and reflect on your studies.

  46. Caution! • These types construct logical arguments and defend them. They may need to learn to respect the ideas of others, especially feeling types.

  47. Feeling • Wants to be able to relate to the material personally • Personal values are important • Likes to please instructors • Learns by being supported and appreciated • Wants faculty who establish personal rapport with students

  48. Feeling • Search for personal meaning to motivate yourself. • Help others to learn. • Whenever possible, choose classes that relate to your personal interests. • Find a comfortable environment for learning.

  49. Caution! • This type may neglect studies because of time spent in helping others. • They may find it difficult to pay attention to material that is not personally meaningful.