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Programming multithreaded code with OpenMP Jemmy Hu SHARCNET HPC Consultant University of Waterloo

Programming multithreaded code with OpenMP Jemmy Hu SHARCNET HPC Consultant University of Waterloo

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Programming multithreaded code with OpenMP Jemmy Hu SHARCNET HPC Consultant University of Waterloo

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  1. Programming multithreaded code with OpenMP Jemmy Hu SHARCNET HPC Consultant University of Waterloo May 31, 2016 /work/jemmyhu/ss2016/openmp/

  2. Contents • Parallel Programming Concepts • OpenMP on SHARCNET • OpenMP - Getting Started - OpenMP Directives Parallel Regions Worksharing Constructs Data Environment Synchronization Runtime functions/environment variables • Case Studies • Recent Updates (SIMD, Task, …) • References

  3. Parallel Computer Memory Architectures Shared Memory (SMP solution) • Shared memory parallel computers vary widely, but generally have in common the ability for all processors to access all memory as global address space.              • Multiple processors can operate independently but share the same memory resources. • Changes in a memory location effected by one processor are visible to all other processors. • It could be a single machine (shared memory machine, workstation, desktop), or shared memory node in a cluster.

  4. Parallel Computer Memory Architectures Hybrid Distributed-Shared Memory (Cluster solution) • Employ both shared and distributed memory architectures                                    • The shared memory component is usually a cache coherent SMP machine. Processors on a given SMP can address that machine's memory as global. • The distributed memory component is the networking of multiple SMPs. SMPs know only about their own memory - not the memory on another SMP. Therefore, network communications are required to move data from one SMP to another. • Current trends seem to indicate that this type of memory architecture will continue to prevail and increase at the high end of computing for the foreseeable future.

  5. Parallel Computing: What is it? • Parallel computing is when a program uses concurrency to either: - decrease the runtime for the solution to a problem. - increase the size of the problem that can be solved. Gives you more performance to throw at your problems. • Parallel programming is not generally trivial, 3 aspects: • specifying parallel execution • communicating between multiple procs/threads • synchronization tools for automated parallelism are either highly specialized or absent • Many issues need to be considered, many of which don’t have an analog in serial computing • data vs. task parallelism • problem structure • parallel granularity

  6. Distributed vs. Shared memory model • Distributed memory systems – For processors to share data, the programmer must explicitly arrange for communication -“Message Passing” – Message passing libraries: • MPI (“Message Passing Interface”) • PVM (“Parallel Virtual Machine”) • Shared memory systems – Compiler directives (OpenMP) – “Thread” based programming (pthread, …)

  7. OpenMP Concepts: What is it? • An Application Program Interface (API) that may be used to explicitly direct multi-threaded, shared memory parallelism • Using compiler directives, library routines and environment variables to automatically generate threaded (or multi-process) code that can run in a concurrent or parallel environment. • Portable: - The API is specified for C/C++ and Fortran - Multiple platforms have been implemented including most Unix platforms and Windows NT • Standardized: Jointly defined and endorsed by a group of major computer hardware and software vendors • What does OpenMP stand for? Open Specifications for Multi Processing

  8. OpenMP: Benefits • Standardization: Provide a standard among a variety of shared memory architectures/platforms • Lean and Mean: Establish a simple and limited set of directives for programming shared memory machines. Significant parallelism can be implemented by using just 3 or 4 directives. • Ease of Use: Provide capability to incrementally parallelize a serial program, unlike message-passing libraries which typically require an all or nothing approach • Portability: Supports Fortran (77, 90, and 95), C, and C++ Public forum for API and membership

  9. OpenMP History • OpenMP continues to evolve - new constructs and features are added with each release. • Initially, the API specifications were released separately for C and Fortran. Since 2005, they have been released together. • The table below chronicles the OpenMP API release history.

  10. OpenMP: compiler • Compilers: Intel (icc, ifort): -openmp GNU (gcc, g++, gfortran), -fopenmp Pathscale (pathcc, pathf90), -openmp PGI (pgcc, pgf77, pgf90), -mp • compile with –openmp flag with default icc –openmp –o hello_openmp hello_openmp.c gcc –fopenmp –o hello_openmp hello_openmp.c ifort –openmp –o hello_openmp hello_openmp.f gfortran –fopenmp –o hello_openmp hello_openmp.f

  11. OpenMP on SHARCNET • SHARCNET systems https://www.sharcnet.ca/my/systems All systems allow for SMP- based parallel programming (i.e., OpenMP) applications, but the size (number of threads) per job differ from cluster to cluster (depends on the number of cores per node on the cluster)

  12. Size of OpenMP Jobs on specific system https://www.sharcnet.ca/my/systems Job usesless than the max threads available on a cluster will be preferable

  13. OpenMP: compile and run at Sharcnet • Compiler flags: • Run OpenMP jobs in the threaded queue Intel (icc, ifort) -openmp GNU(gcc gfortran, >4.1) -fopenmp SHARCNET compile (default compiler is intel): cc, CC, f77, f90 e.g., f90 –openmp –o hello_openmp hello_openmp.f Submit OpenMP job on a cluster with 4-cpu nodes (The size of threaded jobs varies on different systems as discussed in previous page) sqsub –q threaded –n 4 –r 1.0h –o hello_openmp.log ./hello_openmp

  14. OpenMP: simplest example hand-on1 (get first experience) Login to saw, then ssh to one of saw’s dev nodes (saw-dev1 to saw-dev6), e.g., ssh saw-dev2 Copy my ‘openmp’ to your /work directory cd /work/yourid cp –r /work/jemmyhu/ss2016/openmp . Check copy is done ls Type export OMP_NUM_THREADS=4

  15. [jemmyhu@saw332:~/work] cd ss2016/openmp [jemmyhu@saw332:~/work/ss2016/openmp] cd hellow hello-seq.f90: program hello write(*,*) "Hello, world!“ end program [jemmyhu@saw332:~] f90 -o hello-seq hello-seq.f90 [jemmyhu@saw332:~] ./hello-seq Hello, world! Add the two ‘red’ lines to the above code, save it as ‘hello-par1.f90’, compile and run program hello !$omp parallel write(*,*) "Hello, world!" !$omp end parallel end program [jemmyhu@saw332:~] f90 -o hello-par1-seq hello-par1.f90 [jemmyhu@saw332:~] ./hello-par1-seq Hello, world! Compiler ignore openmp directive; parallel region concept

  16. OpenMP: simplest example hello-par1.f90: program hello !$omp parallel write(*,*) "Hello, world!" !$omp end parallel end program [jemmyhu@saw332:~] f90 -openmp -o hello-par1 hello-par1.f90 [jemmyhu@saw332:~] ./hello-par1 Hello, world! Hello, world! Hello, world! Hello, world!

  17. OpenMP: simplest example Now, add another two ‘red’ lines to hello-par1.f90, save it as ‘hello-par2.f90’, compile and run program hello write(*,*) "before" !$omp parallel write(*,*) "Hello, parallel world!" !$omp end parallel write(*,*) "after" end program [jemmyhu@saw332:~] f90 -openmp -o hello-par2 hello-par2.f90 [jemmyhu@saw332:~] ./hello-par2 before Hello, parallel world! Hello, parallel world! …… after

  18. OpenMP: simplest example [jemmyhu@saw332:~] sqsub -q threaded -n 4 -r 1.0h -o hello-par2.log ./hello-par2 WARNING: no memory requirement defined; assuming 2GB submitted as jobid 378196 [jemmyhu@saw332:~] sqjobs jobid queue state ncpus nodes time command ------ ----- ----- ----- ----- ---- ------- 378196 test Q 4 - 8s ./hello-par2 2688 CPUs total, 2474 busy; 435 jobs running; 1 suspended, 1890 queued. 325 nodes allocated; 11 drain/offline, 336 total. Job <3910> is submitted to queue <threaded>. Before Hello, from thread Hello, from thread Hello, from thread Hello, from thread after

  19. OpenMP: simplest example Now, add the red part to hello-par2.f90, save it as ‘hello-par3.f90’, compile and run program hello use omp_lib write(*,*) "before" !$omp parallel write(*,*) "Hello, from thread ", omp_get_thread_num() !$omp end parallel write(*,*) "after" end program before Hello, from thread 1 Hello, from thread 0 Hello, from thread 2 Hello, from thread 3 after Example to use OpenMP API to retrieve a thread’s id (Hand-on 1 end)

  20. OpenMP: hello_omp.f90 program hello90 use omp_lib integer :: id, nthreads !$omp parallel private(id) id = omp_get_thread_num() write (*,*) 'Hello World from thread', id !$omp barrier if ( id .eq. 0 ) then nthreads = omp_get_num_threads() write (*,*) 'There are', nthreads, 'threads' end if !$omp end parallel end program Hand-on, Compile: f90 –openmp –o hello_omp hello_omp.f90 run: ./ hello_omp

  21. OpenMP: hello_omp.c #include <stdio.h> #include <omp.h> int main (int argc, char *argv[]) { int id, nthreads; #pragma omp parallel private(id) { id = omp_get_thread_num(); printf("Hello World from thread %d\n", id); #pragma omp barrier if ( id == 0 ) { nthreads = omp_get_num_threads(); printf("There are %d threads\n",nthreads); } } return 0; } Header file Parallel region directive Runtime library routines synchronization Data types: private vs. shared

  22. OpenMP code structure: C/C++ syntax #include <omp.h> main () { int var1, var2, var3; Serial code . . . Beginning of parallel section. Fork a team of threads. Specify variable scoping #pragma omp parallel private(var1, var2) shared(var3) { Parallel section executed by all threads . . . All threads join master thread and disband } Resume serial code . . . }

  23. OpenMP code structure: Fortran PROGRAM HELLO INTEGER VAR1, VAR2, VAR3 Serial code . . . Beginning of parallel section. Fork a team of threads. Specify variable scoping !$OMP PARALLEL PRIVATE(VAR1, VAR2) SHARED(VAR3) Parallel section executed by all threads . . . All threads join master thread and disband !$OMP END PARALLEL Resume serial code . . . END

  24. OpenMP Components Directives Runtime Library routines Environment variables

  25. OpenMP: Fork-Join Model • OpenMP uses the fork-join model of parallel execution: FORK: the master thread then creates a team of parallel threads The statements in the program that are enclosed by the parallel region construct are then executed in parallel among the various team threads JOIN: When the team threads complete the statements in the parallel region construct, they synchronize and terminate, leaving only the master thread

  26. Shared Memory Model

  27. OpenMP Directives

  28. Basic Directive Formats Fortran: directives come in pairs !$OMP directive [clause, …] [ structured block of code ] !$OMP end directive C/C++: case sensitive #pragma omp directive [clause,…] newline [ structured block of code ]

  29. PARALLEL Region Construct: Summary • A parallel region is a block of code that will be executed by multiple threads. create a team of threads. • A parallel region must be a structured block • It may contain any of the following clauses:

  30. OpenMP: Parallel Regions

  31. Parallel Region review Every thread executes all code enclosed in the parallel region OpenMP library routines are used to obtain thread identifiers and total number of threads #include <stdio.h> #include <omp.h> int main (int argc, char *argv[]) { int id, nthreads; #pragma omp parallel private(id) { id = omp_get_thread_num(); printf("Hello World from thread %d\n", id); #pragma omp barrier if ( id == 0 ) { nthreads = omp_get_num_threads(); printf("There are %d threads\n",nthreads); } } return 0; }

  32. 3 0 2 0 2 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 9 5 9 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 14 13 14 9 3  = 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 19 19 13 17 3 3 0 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 3 11 11 3 Example: Matrix-Vector Multiplication A[n,n] x B[n] = C[n] for (i=0; i < SIZE; i++) { for (j=0; j < SIZE; j++) c[i] += (A[i][j] * b[j]); } Question: Can we simply add one parallel directive? #pragma omp parallel for (i=0; i < SIZE; i++) { for (j=0; j < SIZE; j++) c[i] += (A[i][j] * b[j]); }

  33. Matrix-Vector Multiplication: Parallel Region /* Create a team of threads and scope variables */ #pragma omp parallel shared(A,b,c,total) private(tid,i,j,istart,iend) { tid = omp_get_thread_num(); nid = omp_get_num_threads(); istart = tid*SIZE/nid; iend = (tid+1)*SIZE/nid; for (i=istart; i < iend; i++){ for (j=0; j < SIZE; j++) c[i] += (A[i][j] * b[j]); /* Update and display of running total must be serialized */ #pragma omp critical { total = total + c[i]; printf(" thread %d did row %d\t c[%d]=%.2f\t",tid,i,i,c[i]); printf("Running total= %.2f\n",total); } } /* end of parallel i loop */ } /* end of parallel construct */

  34. OpenMP: Work-sharing constructs: • A work-sharing construct divides the execution of the enclosed code region among the members of the team that encounter it. • Work-sharing constructs do not launch new threads • There is no implied barrier upon entry to a work-sharing construct, however there is an implied barrier at the end of a work sharing construct.

  35. A motivating example

  36. Types of Work-Sharing Constructs:

  37. Work-sharing constructs: Loop construct • The DO / for directive specifies that the iterations of the loop immediately following it must be executed in parallel by the team. This assumes a parallel region has already been initiated, otherwise it executes in serial on a single processor. #pragma omp parallel #pragma omp for for (I=0;I<N;I++){ NEAT_STUFF(I); } !$omp parallel!$omp dodo-loop!$omp end do!$omp parallel

  38. Matrix-Vector Multiplication: Parallel Loop /* Create a team of threads and scope variables */ #pragma omp parallel shared(A,b,c,total) private(tid,i) { tid = omp_get_thread_num(); /* Loop work-sharing construct - distribute rows of matrix */ #pragma omp for private(j) for (i=0; i < SIZE; i++) { for (j=0; j < SIZE; j++) c[i] += (A[i][j] * b[j]); /* Update and display of running total must be serialized */ #pragma omp critical { total = total + c[i]; printf(" thread %d did row %d\t c[%d]=%.2f\t",tid,i,i,c[i]); printf("Running total= %.2f\n",total); } } /* end of parallel i loop */ } /* end of parallel construct */

  39. Summery: Parallel Loop vs. Parallel region Parallel loop: !$OMP PARALLEL DO PRIVATE(i) !$OMP& SHARED(a,b,n) do i=1,n a(i)=a(i)+b(i) enddo !$OMP END PARALLEL DO Parellel region: !$OMP PARALLEL PRIVATE(start, end, i) !$OMP& SHARED(a,b) num_thrds = omp_get_num_threads() thrd_id = omp_get_thread_num() start = n* thrd_id/num_thrds + 1 end = n*(thrd_num+1)/num_thrds do i = start, end a(i)=a(i)+b(i) enddo !$OMP END PARALLEL Parallel region normally gives better performance than loop-based code, but more difficult to implement: • Less thread synchronization. • Less cache misses. • More compiler optimizations.

  40. Hand-on 2 (read, compile, and run) /work/yourID/ss2016/openmp/MM • matrix-vector-seq.c • matrix-vector-parregion.c • matrix-vector-par.c • ser_mm_hu • omp_mm_hu.c

  41. The schedule clause

  42. schedule(static) • Iterations are divided evenly among threads c$omp do shared(x) private(i) c$omp& schedule(static) do i = 1, 1000 x(i)=a enddo

  43. schedule(static,chunk) • Divides the work load in to chunk sized parcels • If there are N threads, each thread does every Nth chunk of work c$omp do shared(x)private(i) c$omp& schedule(static,1000) do i = 1, 12000 … work … enddo

  44. schedule(dynamic,chunk) • Divides the workload into chunk sized parcels. • As a thread finishes one chunk, it grabs the next available chunk. • Default value for chunk is 1. • More overhead, but potentially better load balancing. c$omp do shared(x) private(i) c$omp& schedule(dynamic,1000) do i = 1, 10000 … work … end do

  45. Re-examine omp_mm_hu.c (hand-on) • Change chunk = 10; to be chunk = 5; save, recompile and run, see the difference 2) Change back to chunk=10, and change the lines (4 of them) #pragma omp for schedule (static, chunk) to be #pragma omp for schedule (dynamic, chunk) save as omp_mm_hu_dynamic.c compile and run, see the difference

  46. SECTIONS Directive: Functional/Task parallelism Purpose: • The SECTIONS directive is a non-iterative work-sharing construct. It specifies that the enclosed section(s) of code are to be divided among the threads in the team. • Independent SECTION directives are nested within a SECTIONS directive. Each SECTION is executed once by a thread in the team. Different sections may be executed by different threads. It is possible that for a thread to execute more than one section if it is quick enough and the implementation permits such.