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  1. Headline Line One: Headline line two headline line two headline line two Significance and Background Cancer care and treatment have become an international priority for developed countries outside of the United States. A need exists for developed countries to implement high quality cancer programs for their citizens. UPMC CancerCenter and Children’s Hospital of UPMC have collaborated with Hospital International de Colombia, in Colombia, South America to develop adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient oncology departments. This collaboration includes architectural design of the departments, work flow processes of nurses, pharmacists, and medical assistants, and educating nurses on cancer and cancer drug therapy. Four nurses and one physician spent four weeks in Pittsburgh for training. This experience will serve as a framework for the UPMC CancerCenter’s future collaborations with other countries including China and Kazakhstan. References American Nurses Association. (2008). APRN consensus workgroup and the national council of state board of nursing APRN advisory committee. Retrieved from: http://www.nonpf.org/?page=26 Black, J. Pechak, C. (2013). Benefits and challenges of international clinical education from a US-based physiotherapist faculty perspective. Physiotherapy Research International, 18, 239-249. Mitrea, N., Morse, A., Vosit-Steller, J. (2011) Evolution of an international collaboration: A unique experience across borders. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 15(5), 564-566. Sheridan-Leos, N. (2007). A model of chemotherapy education for novice oncology nurses that supports a culture of safety. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(4), 545-551. Technology was crucial to relationship building with the Colombian staff. Video conferences were used to connect both groups. During class, medically trained translators ensured accurate transfer of information between two languages. High tech translation equipment allowed the Colombian nurses to remain in the classroom with other students and experience the classroom setting. Moving Forward Ongoing support has been provided to Hospital International de Colombia. UPMC nursing has participated in conference calls and video conferencing to deliver guidance as the hospital launched it’s oncology program. UPMC has sent nurses to provide live clinical support to nurses on the adult and pediatric inpatient units. Continued mentorship will be offered as the oncology program begins to expand. Purpose The purpose of this project was to provide comprehensive adult and pediatric oncology and antineoplastic therapy education. UPMC utilized didactic methods of teaching combined with observational experiences and skill sessions. 80% = passing score Interventions Antineoplastic therapy education was delivered in a classroom setting. Observation experiences included inpatient oncology units, outpatient clinics and treatment areas, and the radiation oncology department. An interactive skills session was completed where nurses demonstrated antineoplastic therapy order verification, central line care, donning and doffing personal protective equipment, safe drug administration, and spill management. Evaluation Prior to arrival, the four nurses took a pretest to evaluate their knowledge of antineoplastic therapies. A post- test was administered upon completion of the program. Discussion An increase in exam scores demonstrated an increase in knowledge. UPMC utilized a “train the trainer” method for oncology educationWith knowledge gained during their training, the Colombian nurses developed an oncology training curriculum, policies and procedures, and a plan to educate their colleagues. They also developed a relationship based care model to be utilized at Hospital International de Colombia.

  2. Headline Line One: Headline line two headline line two headline line two Significance and Background Cancer care and treatment have become an international priority for developed countries outside of the United States. A need exists for developed countries to implement high quality cancer programs for their citizens. UPMC CancerCenter and Children’s Hospital of UPMC have collaborated with Hospital International de Colombia, in Colombia, South America to develop adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient oncology departments. This collaboration includes architectural design of the departments, work flow processes of nurses, pharmacists, and medical assistants, and educating nurses on cancer and cancer drug therapy. Four nurses and one physician spent four weeks in Pittsburgh for training. This experience will serve as a framework for the UPMC CancerCenter’s future collaborations with other countries including China and Kazakhstan. References American Nurses Association. (2008). APRN consensus workgroup and the national council of state board of nursing APRN advisory committee. Retrieved from: http://www.nonpf.org/?page=26 Black, J. Pechak, C. (2013). Benefits and challenges of international clinical education from a US-based physiotherapist faculty perspective. Physiotherapy Research International, 18, 239-249. Mitrea, N., Morse, A., Vosit-Steller, J. (2011) Evolution of an international collaboration: A unique experience across borders. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 15(5), 564-566. Sheridan-Leos, N. (2007). A model of chemotherapy education for novice oncology nurses that supports a culture of safety. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(4), 545-551. Technology was crucial to relationship building with the Colombian staff. Video conferences were used to connect both groups. During class, medically trained translators ensured accurate transfer of information between two languages. High tech translation equipment allowed the Colombian nurses to remain in the classroom with other students and experience the classroom setting. Moving Forward Ongoing support has been provided to Hospital International de Colombia. UPMC nursing has participated in conference calls and video conferencing to deliver guidance as the hospital launched it’s oncology program. UPMC has sent nurses to provide live clinical support to nurses on the adult and pediatric inpatient units. Continued mentorship will be offered as the oncology program begins to expand. Purpose The purpose of this project was to provide comprehensive adult and pediatric oncology and antineoplastic therapy education. UPMC utilized didactic methods of teaching combined with observational experiences and skill sessions. 80% = passing score Interventions Antineoplastic therapy education was delivered in a classroom setting. Observation experiences included inpatient oncology units, outpatient clinics and treatment areas, and the radiation oncology department. An interactive skills session was completed where nurses demonstrated antineoplastic therapy order verification, central line care, donning and doffing personal protective equipment, safe drug administration, and spill management. Evaluation Prior to arrival, the four nurses took a pretest to evaluate their knowledge of antineoplastic therapies. A post- test was administered upon completion of the program. Discussion An increase in exam scores demonstrated an increase in knowledge. UPMC utilized a “train the trainer” method for oncology educationWith knowledge gained during their training, the Colombian nurses developed an oncology training curriculum, policies and procedures, and a plan to educate their colleagues. They also developed a relationship based care model to be utilized at Hospital International de Colombia.

  3. Headline Line One: Headline line two headline line two headline line two Significance and Background Cancer care and treatment have become an international priority for developed countries outside of the United States. A need exists for developed countries to implement high quality cancer programs for their citizens. UPMC CancerCenter and Children’s Hospital of UPMC have collaborated with Hospital International de Colombia, in Colombia, South America to develop adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient oncology departments. This collaboration includes architectural design of the departments, work flow processes of nurses, pharmacists, and medical assistants, and educating nurses on cancer and cancer drug therapy. Four nurses and one physician spent four weeks in Pittsburgh for training. This experience will serve as a framework for the UPMC CancerCenter’s future collaborations with other countries including China and Kazakhstan. References American Nurses Association. (2008). APRN consensus workgroup and the national council of state board of nursing APRN advisory committee. Retrieved from: http://www.nonpf.org/?page=26 Black, J. Pechak, C. (2013). Benefits and challenges of international clinical education from a US-based physiotherapist faculty perspective. Physiotherapy Research International, 18, 239-249. Mitrea, N., Morse, A., Vosit-Steller, J. (2011) Evolution of an international collaboration: A unique experience across borders. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 15(5), 564-566. Sheridan-Leos, N. (2007). A model of chemotherapy education for novice oncology nurses that supports a culture of safety. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(4), 545-551. Technology was crucial to relationship building with the Colombian staff. Video conferences were used to connect both groups. During class, medically trained translators ensured accurate transfer of information between two languages. High tech translation equipment allowed the Colombian nurses to remain in the classroom with other students and experience the classroom setting. Moving Forward Ongoing support has been provided to Hospital International de Colombia. UPMC nursing has participated in conference calls and video conferencing to deliver guidance as the hospital launched it’s oncology program. UPMC has sent nurses to provide live clinical support to nurses on the adult and pediatric inpatient units. Continued mentorship will be offered as the oncology program begins to expand. Purpose The purpose of this project was to provide comprehensive adult and pediatric oncology and antineoplastic therapy education. UPMC utilized didactic methods of teaching combined with observational experiences and skill sessions. 80% = passing score Interventions Antineoplastic therapy education was delivered in a classroom setting. Observation experiences included inpatient oncology units, outpatient clinics and treatment areas, and the radiation oncology department. An interactive skills session was completed where nurses demonstrated antineoplastic therapy order verification, central line care, donning and doffing personal protective equipment, safe drug administration, and spill management. Evaluation Prior to arrival, the four nurses took a pretest to evaluate their knowledge of antineoplastic therapies. A post- test was administered upon completion of the program. Discussion An increase in exam scores demonstrated an increase in knowledge. UPMC utilized a “train the trainer” method for oncology educationWith knowledge gained during their training, the Colombian nurses developed an oncology training curriculum, policies and procedures, and a plan to educate their colleagues. They also developed a relationship based care model to be utilized at Hospital International de Colombia.

  4. Headline Line One: Headline line two headline line two headline line two Significance and Background Cancer care and treatment have become an international priority for developed countries outside of the United States. A need exists for developed countries to implement high quality cancer programs for their citizens. UPMC CancerCenter and Children’s Hospital of UPMC have collaborated with Hospital International de Colombia, in Colombia, South America to develop adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient oncology departments. This collaboration includes architectural design of the departments, work flow processes of nurses, pharmacists, and medical assistants, and educating nurses on cancer and cancer drug therapy. Four nurses and one physician spent four weeks in Pittsburgh for training. This experience will serve as a framework for the UPMC CancerCenter’s future collaborations with other countries including China and Kazakhstan. References American Nurses Association. (2008). APRN consensus workgroup and the national council of state board of nursing APRN advisory committee. Retrieved from: http://www.nonpf.org/?page=26 Black, J. Pechak, C. (2013). Benefits and challenges of international clinical education from a US-based physiotherapist faculty perspective. Physiotherapy Research International, 18, 239-249. Mitrea, N., Morse, A., Vosit-Steller, J. (2011) Evolution of an international collaboration: A unique experience across borders. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 15(5), 564-566. Sheridan-Leos, N. (2007). A model of chemotherapy education for novice oncology nurses that supports a culture of safety. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(4), 545-551. Technology was crucial to relationship building with the Colombian staff. Video conferences were used to connect both groups. During class, medically trained translators ensured accurate transfer of information between two languages. High tech translation equipment allowed the Colombian nurses to remain in the classroom with other students and experience the classroom setting. Moving Forward Ongoing support has been provided to Hospital International de Colombia. UPMC nursing has participated in conference calls and video conferencing to deliver guidance as the hospital launched it’s oncology program. UPMC has sent nurses to provide live clinical support to nurses on the adult and pediatric inpatient units. Continued mentorship will be offered as the oncology program begins to expand. Purpose The purpose of this project was to provide comprehensive adult and pediatric oncology and antineoplastic therapy education. UPMC utilized didactic methods of teaching combined with observational experiences and skill sessions. 80% = passing score Interventions Antineoplastic therapy education was delivered in a classroom setting. Observation experiences included inpatient oncology units, outpatient clinics and treatment areas, and the radiation oncology department. An interactive skills session was completed where nurses demonstrated antineoplastic therapy order verification, central line care, donning and doffing personal protective equipment, safe drug administration, and spill management. Evaluation Prior to arrival, the four nurses took a pretest to evaluate their knowledge of antineoplastic therapies. A post- test was administered upon completion of the program. Discussion An increase in exam scores demonstrated an increase in knowledge. UPMC utilized a “train the trainer” method for oncology educationWith knowledge gained during their training, the Colombian nurses developed an oncology training curriculum, policies and procedures, and a plan to educate their colleagues. They also developed a relationship based care model to be utilized at Hospital International de Colombia.