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LESSON 1

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LESSON 1

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  1. LESSON 1 GEOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL AND CULTURAL SYSTEMS

  2. AGENDA 8.13.13 • BELLRINGER/DO NOW: 5 MIN • INTRO(NEW LEARNING): 15 MIN • I DO(MODEL): 5 MIN • WE DO: #’D HEADS 10 MIN • YOU DO/EXIT TICKET: 15 MIN

  3. NO. 1 A CONFLICT HAS BROKEN OUT BETWEEN TWO COUNTRIES. ONE OF THE COUNTRIES THREATENS TO ATTACK THE OTHER COUNTRY. WHAT ORGANIZATION WOULD WORK TO RESOLVE THE CONFLICT BETWEEN THESE TWO NATIONS? • REPUBLICAN PARTY • SUPREME COURT • HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES • UNITED NATIONS

  4. GLE’S 3,4 • Construct a map based on given narrative information • Construct a chart or diagram to display geographical information in an organized way

  5. GLE’S 1, 2 • Use time zones in the United States or the International Date Line to interpret a map or representation of a globe and calculate current times in different places Locate major landforms and geographic features, places, and bodies of water/waterways on a map of Louisiana

  6. OBJECTIVE • By the end of this class, I will be able to construct a map based on given narrative information, using a blank outline map of Louisiana with 85% accuracy

  7. TYPES OF MAPS • PHYSICAL MAP: SHOWS LANDFORMS AND BODIES OF WATER OF AN AREA • LANDFORM: NATURAL GEOGRAPHIC FEATURE • POLITICAL MAP: SHOWS FEATURES THAT HUMAN BEINGS HAVE CREATED • CITIES AND TOWNS, STATES, PROVINCES, COUNTRIES, NATIONAL BORDERS

  8. OTHER TYPES OF MAPS • TOPOGRAPHIC MAP: SHOWS BOTH NATURAL AND HUMAN-MADE FEATURES OF AN AREA • ELEVATION, RIVERS, LAKES, CANALS, BRIDGES, ROADS • CLIMATE MAP: AVERAGE TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION FOR AN AREA • THEMATIC MAP: SPECIFIC TYPES OF INFORMATION FOR AN AREA • POPULATION DENSITY, NATURAL RESOURCES

  9. READING AND INTERPRETING A MAP • COMMON FEATURES: TITLE, KEY OR LEGEND, COMPASS ROSE, DISTANCE SCALE • TITLE: TELLS MAP’S SUBJECT AND THE TYPE OF INFORMATION IT CONTAINS • KEY OR LEGEND: LISTS AND EXPLAINS THE SYMBOLS AND/OR COLORS USED ON THE MAP • COMPASS ROSE: DIRECTIONS N, S, W, E • DISTANCE SCALE: RELATIONSHIP OF A UNIT OF LENGTH ON THE MAP TO A UNIT OF DISTANCE ON THE EARTH

  10. I DO • FIRST I WILL MODEL HOW TO READ/INTERPRET A MAP • NEXT, I WILL MODEL HOW TO PARTICIPATE IN NUMBERED HEADS TOGETHER

  11. WE DO • 1. WHY MIGHT YOU FIND A COMPASS ROSE ON A MAP? • 2. EXPLAIN WHY SOMEONE MAY WANT TO HAVE A MAP WITH CLIMATE TYPE AND TEMPERATURES? • 3. WHY IS THE TITLE OF A MAP IMPORTANT? • 4. DIFFERENTIATE HOW A POLITICAL MAP IS DIFFERENT FROM A PHYSICAL MAP?

  12. YOU DO/EXIT TICKET • I WILL NOW GIVE YOU A PHYSICAL MAP OF LOUISIANA. YOU WILL BEGIN CREATING THIS MAP USING SPECIFIC INFORMATION THAT WILL BE GIVEN TO YOU! • EXIT TICKET: HOW IS A POLITICAL MAP DIFFERENT THAN A PHYSICAL MAP? WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?

  13. AGENDA 8.14.13 • BELLRINGER/DO NOW: 5 MIN • INTRO/NEW MATERIAL: 15 MIN • I DO (MODEL READING TEXT AND ANNOTATING): 5 MIN • WE DO: 10 MIN • YOU DO/EXIT TICKET: 15 MIN

  14. NO. 2 • OPRAH AND PHYLIS WERE STUDENTS AT THE SAME SCHOOL. PHYLIS CHOSE TO DROP OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL. OPRAH CHOSE TO GRADUATE FROM HIGH SCHOOL. NEITHER TEEN HAD EVER WORKED BEFORE. OPRAH AND PHYLIS APPLIED FOR THE SAME JOB. OPRAH GOT THE JOB. WHY? • A. IT IS A NATIONAL LAW THAT HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUTS CANNOT GET A JOB • B. OPRAH HAD MORE KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS THAT PHYLIS HAD. • C. PHYLIS HAD A POOR WORK RECORD • D. OPRAH HAD WORKED AT THE STORE BEFORE

  15. GLE 1 • Use time zones in the United States or the International Date Line to interpret a map or representation of a globe and calculate current times in different places

  16. OBJECTIVE • By the end of this class, I will be able to use time zones in the United States or the International Date Line to interpret a map • or representation of a globe and calculate current times in different places with 85% accuracy

  17. GEOGRAPHY BASICS • LATITUDE LINES OR PARALLELS: IMAGINARY LINES THAT RUN EAST AND WEST AROUND THE GLOBE • PARALLEL TO THE EQUATOR AND SHOW DISTANCES IN DEGREES NORTH OR SOUTH • EQUATOR: LOCATED HALFWAY BETWEEN THE NORTH AND SOUTH POLES, AT 0 DEGREE LATITUDE • DIVIDES GLOBE INTO NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN HEMISPHERES

  18. WORLD GEOGRAPHY BASICS • TROPIC OF CANCER: 23.5 DEGREES NORTH • TROPIC OF CAPRICORN: 23.5 DEGREES SOUTH • WITHIN THESE LINES IS THE CLIMATE ZONE

  19. WORLD GEOGRAPHY BASICS • LONGITUDE LINES: IMAGINARY LINES RUNNING NORTH AND SOUTH AROUND THE GLOBE • SHOW DISTANCES EAST AND WEST OF THE PRIME MERIDIAN • PRIME MERIDIAN: LOCATED AT 0 DEGREES LONGITUDE • RUNS FROM NORTH POLE TO SOUTH POLE • DIVIDES WORLD INTO WESTERN AND EASTERN HEMISPHERES

  20. TIME ZONES • LINES OF LONGITUDE USED TO DETERMINE WORLD’S TIME ZONES • U.S. HAS 6 • INTERNATIONAL DATE LINE LOCATED AT 180 DEGREES LONGITUDE • SUNDAY JUST WEST OF LINE, SATURDAY EAST OF LINE

  21. TIME ZONE MAP

  22. I DO • WATCH, LISTEN AND PAY CLOSE ATTENTION AS I MODEL HOW TO READ A PIECE OF NON-FICTION TEXT AND ANNOTATE THE TEXT TO HELP ME UNDERSTAND

  23. WE DO • WE WILL NOW READ THE NEXT PARAGRAPH TOGETHER AND ANNOTATE THE PARAGRAPH. WE WILL ALSO ANSWER A QUESTION

  24. YOU DO/EXIT TICKET • COMPLETE READING THE TEXT AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS THAT FOLLOW. • EXIT TICKET: WRITE A HALF-PAGE SUMMARY, USING COMPLETE SENTENCES, OF THE TEXT WE READ TODAY

  25. AGENDA 8.15.13 • BELLRINGER/DO NOW: 5 MIN • INTRO (REGIONS; PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS): 15 MIN • I DO( MODEL READING NON-FICTION TEXT AND ANNOTATING): 5 MIN • WE DO: READING AND ANNOTATING: 10 MIN • YOU DO/EXIT TICKET: 15 MIN

  26. NO. 3 In the 1700s, under an economic system called mercantilism, Great Britain expected its American colonies to provide A. labor to work in British factories. B. manufactured goods to sell in British cities. C. citizens elected to serve in the British Parliament. D. raw materials and markets for British products.

  27. GLE’S 5, 7, 8 • Describe and analyze the distinguishing physical and/or human characteristics of Louisiana regions (G-1B-M1); • Explain how or why specific regions are changing as a result of physical phenomena (e.g., changes in the coastal wetlands) (G-1B-M3); • Identify and describe factors that cause a Louisiana region to change (e.g., natural occurrences, disasters, migration) (G-1B-M3)

  28. OBJECTIVE • By the end of this class, I will be able to explain how and why regions change and why this is specifically important to us in Louisiana with 85% accuracy on my exit ticket

  29. PLACES AND REGIONS • REGIONS: AREA WITH COMMON FEATURES • MAY RELATE TO PHYSICAL FEATURES, HUMAN FEATURES OR BOTH • 7 GEOGRPAHIC REGIONS IDENTIFIED ON NORTH AMERICAN CONTINENT

  30. 7 GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS • ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN • APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN REGION • CENTRAL LOWLANDS • GREAT PLAINS • INTERMOUNTAIN REGION • CANADIAN SHIELD • ROCKY MOUNTAIN

  31. HOW AND WHY REGIONS CHANGE • EROSION: GRADUAL WEARING AWAY OF LANDFORMS BY WATER, WIND, AND HARSH WEATHER • HURRICANES CAN RESULT IN SEVERE BEACH ERSOSION • LEVEE: EMBANKMENT BUILT BESIDE A BODY OF WATER TO PREVENT FLOODING • PEOPLE’S NEEDS AND WANTS ALSO CHANGE REGIONS • GOLD RUSH IN 1849; WARM CLIMATE

  32. PHYSICAL FEATURES • THE NATURAL GEOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS THAT DEFINE AN AREA • LOUISIANA: 47,752 SQUARE MILES; 3,000 MILES OF INLAND WATERS; SOUTHERNMOST STATE IN U.S. • LOUISIANA HAS 3 NATURAL REGIONS: LOWLANDS, TERRACES, HILLS

  33. PHYSICAL FEATURES • Lowlands: include coastal marshes and Mississippi Flood Plain • Terraces: include parishes northeast of the Mississippi and prairies in southwestern Louisiana • Upland Hills: surround the Red River Valley

  34. I DO • WATCH, LISTEN AND PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO HOW I READ AND ANNOTATE THE FOLLOWING TEXT. I WILL THEN MODEL HOW TO ANSWER A TEXT BASED QUESTION

  35. WE DO • WE WILL NOW READ THE NEXT PARAGRAPH AND ANSWER A TEXT BASED QUESTION

  36. YOU DO/EXIT TICKET • INDIVIDUALLY, COMPLETE THE READING AND THE QUESTIONS THAT FOLLOW • EXIT TICKET: WRITE A ½ PAGE ANALYSIS explaining how and why regions change and why this is specifically important to us in Louisiana

  37. AGENDA 8.16.13 • BELLRINGER/DO NOW: 5 MIN • INTRO: PHYSICAL FEATURES: 15 MIN • I DO: MODEL HOW TO READ A PHYSICAL MAP (5) • WE DO: COMPLETE PHYSICAL MAP (10) • YOU DO: CREATE A DESCRIPTION OF THE PHYSICAL MAP TO BE DISTRIBUTED AT VISITOR CENTER (15) • CLOSE: EXIT TICKET (5)

  38. GLE’S 5, 7, 8 • Describe and analyze the distinguishing physical and/or human characteristics of Louisiana regions (G-1B-M1); • Explain how or why specific regions are changing as a result of physical phenomena (e.g., changes in the coastal wetlands) (G-1B-M3); • Identify and describe factors that cause a Louisiana region to change (e.g., natural occurrences, disasters, migration) (G-1B-M3)

  39. OBJECTIVE • BY THE END OF THIS CLASS, I WILL BE ABLE TO EXPLAIN HOW AND WHY PHYSICAL FEATURES HAVE INFLUENCED THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOUISIANA WITH 85% ACCURACY ON MY EXIT TICKET

  40. PHYSICAL FEATURES • Mississippi River, largest in the United States and one of busiest commercial waterways in the world, flows through Louisiana • Atchafalaya River: a tributary or branch of the Mississippi River • Red River • Louisiana’s southern boundary is Gulf of Mexico

  41. PHYSICAL FEATURES • Subtropical Climate: mild winters, hot and humid summers • Climate: typical weather of a region over a long period of time • Fertile soil is abundant throughout Louisiana and a GEOGRAPHICAL factor that helped make state a major cotton and sugar cane producer throughout the 1800s