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Obesity a Growing Problem!

Obesity a Growing Problem!

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Obesity a Growing Problem!

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  1. Obesity a Growing Problem! CAPT Martha Culver Acting Deputy Regional Administrator Nurse Consultant CDR Madelyn Reyes Senior Nurse Consultant Health Resources and Services Administration Department of Health and Human Services

  2. Childhood Obesity has tripled in last 30 years Increased from 6% in 1980 to 20% among children ages 6 to 11 and 5% to 18% among adolescents ages 12 to 19. The Prevalence of Childhood Obesity

  3. Trend in Obesity Prevalence, US Children Aged 6-17, 1976-2008 Measured Height & Weight Data from NHANES Source: Singh GK, Kogan MD. Book Chapter. Global Perspectives On Childhood Obesity. Elsevier Press. Sept 2010.

  4. Obesity and Overweight Prevalence (%), U.S. Children Aged 10-17 Years Source: Singh GK, Kogan MD. Book Chapter. Global Perspectives On Childhood Obesity. Elsevier Press. Sept 2010.

  5. Obesity Prevalence (%) by Family Income/Poverty Level U.S. Children Aged 10-17 Years, 2003-2007 Source: Singh GK, Siahpush M, Kogan MD. Annals of Epidemiology. Vol. 20, No. 1. January 2010.

  6. 2007 Obesity Prevalence, Children Aged 10-17 Years Source: Singh GK, Kogan MD, van Dyck PC. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. May 2010.

  7. Source: Singh GK, Kogan MD, van Dyck PC. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. May 2010.

  8. Impact to our Society • $78 billion a year is spent to treat medical conditions including: • Heart disease • Certain cancers • Type II diabetes • Stroke • Arthritis • Breathing Problems • Psychological Disorders

  9. Social and Emotional Health Obese Children • Have a lower self-esteem • Are more likely to suffer from depression • Are at a greater risk for Bullying and Teasing • Perform at a lower academic level

  10. How did we get Here? • Dietary Patterns • Physical Activity Patterns • Environmental Factors • Changing Lifestyle • Communities at Risk • Health Disparities

  11. HRSA Activities Related to Childhood Obesity Prevention • Health Center Program • Partnership with NIH on We Can! Initiative • Bright Futures in Practice: Nutrition • National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality

  12. Health Center Program • In 2008, federally-funded health centers served over 17 million individuals, including more than 6 million age 19 or under. • Due to obesity prevalence and its comorbidities, centers are implementing initiatives related to nutrition, obesity, and physical fitness. • A variety of strategies are being used, including but not limited to early screening and diagnosis, presentations in schools, nutritional counseling for children and families, case management and outreach.

  13. Partnership with NIH on We Can! • National outreach program designed for families and communities to help children age 8 to 13 maintain a healthy weight. • Administered by NIH, the program focuses on three important behaviors: • improved food choices • increased physical activity • reduced screen time • Over 100 health centers and State-based associations of health centers are participating in the We Can! initiative.

  14. National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality • The Center will launch the Healthy Weight Collaborative to share evidence-based, community-based and clinical interventions in preventing and treating obesity. • Collaborative teams will be recruited to help states and local communities develop practical approaches that link public health and primary care. • The Center will oversee and provide technical assistance to the team, composed of health departments, community-based organizations, HHS and HRSA grantees, and other related entities.

  15. Let's Move! • Create a healthy start on life for our children, from pregnancy through early childhood • Empower parents and caregivers to make healthy choices for their families • Serve healthier food in schools • Ensure access to healthy, affordable food • Increase opportunities for physical activity

  16. School Based Health Clinics • Treat overweight and obesity comprehensively • Organize groups of high-risk children and adolescents to help foster cohesion and peer support toward healthy lifestyle goals • Ensures that the emotional risk factors for obesity and overweight – depression, stress, and low self-esteem – are not overlooked • Are most effective when they reinforce and coordinate overall policy and environmental changes that encourage physical activity and healthy eating • Offer families support, encouragement, and materials, which enhance the efforts of a healthy lifestyles • Are evaluation sites for monitoring the effectiveness of strategies to prevent obesity and improve nutrition and health

  17. Contact Information CAPT Martha Culver Acting Deputy Regional Administrator/Nurse Consultant HRSA/ORO 1301 Young St., Suite 1030 Dallas, TX 75202 Martha.Culver@hrsa.hhs.gov CDR Madelyn Reyes Senior Nurse Consultant HRSA/MCHB/DHSPS 5600 Fishers Lane Room 18-12, Parklawn Building Rockville, MD 20857 Madelyn.Reyes@hrsa.hhs.gov