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Energy Efficiency/Weatherization – New Technologies PowerPoint Presentation
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Energy Efficiency/Weatherization – New Technologies

Energy Efficiency/Weatherization – New Technologies

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Energy Efficiency/Weatherization – New Technologies

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  1. Energy Efficiency/Weatherization – New Technologies TVA Near Zero Energy High Performance Homes Research Project Frank Rapley, General ManagerTVA Efficiency Program Design Regional Marketing, Member Services & Communications Conference Savannah, Georgia

  2. Today’s Discussion • TVA Campbell Creek Research Project • Project Scope • Simulated Occupancy • Test Home Overview • High Performance Home Features • House 1 – Builder House • House 2 – Retrofit House • House 3 – Near Zero-Energy House • Monitoring and Occupancy Simulation Evaluation • Key Takeaways

  3. Overview • TVA built three experimental homes at Campbell Creek in East Tennessee to evaluate the effectiveness of residential construction and efficiency technologies in a controlled environment • TVA and its partners, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and EPRI, will be evaluating over the next few years: • residential building techniques • energy efficiency technologies • demand response concepts • consumer energy-use behaviors • TVA will use the results to develop the best, most cost-effective residential energy efficiency and demand-response tools to educate builders, developers and consumers

  4. Project Scope • Construction began in FY 2008 • Three houses completed and turned over to TVA at the beginning of 2009 calendar year: • Builder House • Retrofit House • Near Zero-Energy House • Simulated occupancy started June 2009 • Over 300 sensors and measurements in the houses

  5. Simulated OccupancyDone automatically by installed control systems • All thermostats set same (no setback) • Lights on and off • Run dishwashers on schedule • Run clothes washer and dryer on schedule • Activate showers on schedule • Open and close refrigerator and freezer doors • Human emulator (latent generator – in progress) • Electric resistance heaters to simulate other internal electrical loads

  6. Energy-Efficient Test Homes • Net Monthly Energy Use* • Standard House 1,738 kWh • Retrofit House 1,377 kWh • Advanced House** 795 kWh • *Average net consumption July 09 – Jan 10 • **Includes reduction by solar generation Monthly Energy Cost* Standard House $146.60 Retrofit House $117.56 Advanced House $40.06 *Average cost July 2009 – Jan. 2010 Using Local Utility’s Residential Rates and TVA Generation Partners Solar Credit on Advanced House

  7. TVA Near Zero Energy High Performance Homes House 1: Builder House (HERS 85)

  8. House 1 – Builder House (HERS 85) • Cost: $250,000 • This house represents a typical house (2,400 square feet) currently built in the Tennessee Valley and serves as a control against which the other homes are compared • Incorporates local building codes and standards and is projected to use slightly less energy than a new house built to the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) • “All electric” upgrade • Two SEER 13 heat pumps total 4.5 tons • 5.7 Air Change per Hour (ACH) @ 50 Pascal

  9. TVA Near Zero Energy High Performance Homes House 2: Retrofit House (HERS 66)

  10. House 2 – Retrofit House – HERS 66 Cost: +$10,000 from base house for retrofits described below • Same construction as House 1 (Builder House), but retrofitted with energy efficiency technologies that an existing homeowner could add to improve efficiency • Major retrofits include: low-e, gas-filled windows; sealed, insulated attic; 100% CFL; smaller (3 ton versus 4 ton), higher SEER (16 versus 13) heat pump; and heat pump water heater • Projected to use two-thirds of the energy of a new house built to code • Blower door test - 3.4 ACH at 50 Pascal

  11. House 2 – Retrofit House – HERS 66Envelope • Slab construction - with 1’ X 24” perimeter insulation • High performance windows U-value of 0.34 and SHGC of 0.33 • Windows installed with panned flashing and weather-lapped flashing tapes • Window sash replacement to lower U values and SHGC • Attic cathederalized with spray foam and spray Fiberglas and sealed (i.e. becomes conditioned space.) • Whole house air tightening package and addition of mechanical ventilation (one or both supply ventilation with bath exhaust) • Sealing/insulating knee walls in the bonus room • Ducts inside the conditioned space

  12. House 2 – Retrofit House – HERS 66Technologies • HVAC • One 3 ton SEER 16 heat pump with ECM indoor fan motors and zone dampers • Kitchen exhaust fan ducted to the outside • Duct sealing • Ducts located in sealed (semi-conditioned) attic • Electrical • Energy efficient lighting fixtures with 100% fluorescent • Energy Star appliances • High efficiency office vs. lower efficiency • High efficiency entertainment center vs. lower efficiency • Plumbing • Heat Pump Water Heater

  13. House 2: Heat Pump in Cathedralized Attic

  14. House 2: Hybrid – Heat Pump Water Heater

  15. TVA Near Zero Energy High Performance Homes House 3: NZEH – Big Step House (HERS 32)

  16. House 3: NZEH – Big Step House – HERS 32 Cost: +$35,000 from base house including PV without any incentives • Built using the latest in construction technologies to make it as efficient as possible and still provide excellent curb appeal • Home characteristics include: triple pane windows; R-48 spray fiberglass ceiling insulation; single HVAC system (2 ton), SEER 16 heat pump; 100% CFL; and Energy Star appliances • Employs photovoltaic panels and solar water heating to help make it anear zero-energy house • Projected to use one-third the energy of a "code“ house • Blower door test - 2.4 ACH @ 50 Pascal

  17. House 3: NZEH – Big Step House – HERS 32Envelope • 2 X 6 Advanced framing air tight construction using flash (foam) and sprayed spider (fiberglass) and structural insulating sheathing with taped seams • High performance triple pane windows U-value of 0.12 and SHGC of 0.30 • Windows installed with panned flashing and weather-lapped flashing tapes • Slab perimeter insulated with 2 inch foam • R-48 spray fiberglass ceiling insulation (conventional vented attic) and radiant barrier on roof deck

  18. House 3: Structural Insulated Sheathing

  19. House 3: Spray Foam Adds R-Value and Air Barrier

  20. House 3: NZEH – Big Step House – HERS 32 Technologies HVAC • Single HVAC system (2 ton) SEER 16 heat pump with ECM fan motor and variable speed compressor. System has zone dampers serving both floors • Ducts and indoor coil inside the conditioned space • Transfer ducts in each bedroom • Mechanical ventilation with a motorized damper connected to the central air distribution system and controlled with an energy recovery ventilator exhausting three baths and kitchen, and supplying the three bedrooms and great room • The supply outlets positioned at high interior walls aimed toward the exterior walls in each room

  21. House 3: NZEH – Big Step House – HERS 32Technologies • Electrical and Appliances • House will be wired with three kill switches, entertainment system, home office and whole house, with ORNL • Feed back meter will be wired into the house showing in the kitchen the whole house energy consumption real time • Energy efficient lighting fixtures with 100% fluorescent • Energy Star appliances • Photovoltaics - 2.5 kW of PV is installed on the roof. The system is grid connected through TVA Generation Partners program • Plumbing • Drainback solar domestic water heating system is installed • Heat recovery from grey water* • Heat recovery from dryer vent* • Heat recovery from dishwasher*

  22. House 3: Solar Drainback Tank

  23. House 3: Solar Storage Tank and HEX

  24. House 3: Robo Refrigerator

  25. House 3: PVs and Solar Water Heating

  26. TVA Near Zero Energy High Performance Homes Monitoring and Occupancy Simulation

  27. Monitoring and Occupancy Program • Limited winter 2008-09 data • Full monitoring and occupancy simulation started June 1, 2009 • ORNL and EPRI working on the simulation details • Blower door tests • House 1 – 5.7 ACH @ 50 Pascal • House 2 – 3.4 ACH @ 50 Pascal • House 2 – 2.4 ACH @ 50 Pascal

  28. Electric Bills July 2009 – January 2010

  29. kWh Usage July 2009 – January 2010

  30. Solar Generation Summary

  31. Generation Partners Solar Credit

  32. Builder House Energy Breakdown - January 2010

  33. Retrofit House Energy Breakdown - January 2010

  34. NZEH Energy Breakdown - January 2010

  35. Key Takeaways • While data is still be collected for the first year, information suggests making sure you have a good air barrier on a house is key, in particular: • Ducts inside the conditioned space • 2 X 6 advanced framing ensures air tight construction • Utilizing flash (foam) and sprayed spider (fiberglass) • For new construction, consider having houses solar ready (proper orientation, etc.) • Possible modifications being considered for next year (FY 2011) include: • House 3: Considering geothermal system change out • House 2: Considering change to variable refrigerant flow heat pump in air conditioned space (ductless) • House 1: Will remain as control house • Also will look more at demand response activities • An interim report on the TVA energy efficiency homes research project to be released Summer 2010

  36. Questions David Dinse Project Manager, Environment and Technology Tennessee Valley Authority (423) 751-7410 drdinse@tva.gov