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SIN PowerPoint Presentation

SIN

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SIN

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  1. SIN Knox, Ian. Theology for Teachers

  2. Sin and its effects are visible everywhere in exploitive relationships, loveless families, crime, oppression, etc. Sin is always understood as a refusal to do God’s will.

  3. BIBLICAL TEACHING ON SIN • Just by being born we are influenced by the state of sin that exists in the world: we are born with a tendency to self-centredness. • As we mature we eventually make a conscious decision to accept and be a part of this evil. Thus we commit our own personal sins

  4. Early Biblical writers were conscious of the power of evil in the world. How did they reconcile this with their faith in the goodness of God and of creation? • Their stories in Genesis offer the explanations that teach us that God is not the author of evil, humans are.

  5. We must take responsibility for the state we’re in. Evil came into the world as a result of sin: our refusal to accept and respond to God’s invitation to love.

  6. CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES ON SIN • Christian Scriptures affirm and add to the Hebrew Scriptures’ image of sin. • The Christian Scriptures talk about sin in relationship to Jesus, who came to forgive and conquer sin.

  7. CONDITIONS FOR SIN • In order for it to be said that someone has sinned, the Church teaches that all three of the following conditions must be present: • Sufficient knowledge or reflection. • Full consent of the will. • Serious matter—causes real evil to myself or another person. Often the gravity of the evil determines the gravity of the sin.

  8. CONDITIONS FOR SIN continued… • If knowledge or consent is completely absent (e.g. someone commits murder while sleepwalking) then a person is not considered guilty of sin; if knowledge or consent is impeded then the corresponding personal responsibility is also diminished. We cannot sin if we don’t want to or are not aware of it.

  9. DEGREES OF SIN Taking the previous conditions into account, the Church has distinguished degrees of sinfulness.

  10. MORTAL SIN • A complete break in one’s relationship with God • We make a conscious decision to turn completely away from God’s offer of love. • By looking at human relationships we can see the mortal results of some actions and attitudes. Murder, for example, obviously kills a relationship with another. Slander (causing the destruction of a person’s reputation) is also a serious sin.

  11. MORTAL SIN continued.. • We don’t commit mortal sins by accident. • Mortal sins are not usually single, isolated acts (although they can be). • Mortal sin involves a whole life-orientation that has caused us to turn away from God completely. • We don’t commit mortal sins by accident. • Mortal sins are not usually single, isolated acts (although they can be). • Mortal sin involves a whole life-orientation that has caused us to turn away from God completely.

  12. VENIAL SIN • Does not completely separate us from God but represents a ‘cooling’ in the relationship. Examples might include a failure to be honest, or crude behaviour.

  13. SOCIAL SIN • Describes human-made structures when they offend human dignity by causing people to suffer oppression, exploitation, or marginalization • Sin begins in the hearts and minds of individuals but it then creeps into the systems that we set up in society. • These institutions and systems are contrary to the divine goodness. • Social sin leads its victims to do evil in their turn.

  14. SINS OF COMMISSION Doing wrong.

  15. SINS OF OMISSION Failing to do what is right.