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Mars or Bust Management Briefing. Subsystem Update 11/19/03. Current Status - all Subsystems. Revised Systems Requirements Document Block diagrams indicating inputs/outputs Requests for Information (RFI’s) written and responded

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Mars or Bust Management Briefing


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    Presentation Transcript
    1. Mars or Bust Management Briefing Subsystem Update 11/19/03

    2. Current Status - all Subsystems • Revised Systems Requirements Document • Block diagrams indicating inputs/outputs • Requests for Information (RFI’s) written and responded • Iterating technology equipment lists with mass, power and volume estimates

    3. Environment Control and Life Support System (ECLSS)

    4. Current Status • All technologies selected with optimum mass, power, volume considerations • Functional diagrams completed: • Atmosphere • Water • Waste • Food • Human Consumables estimates completed: • Air • Water • Waste • Food

    5. Overview of ECLSS subsystems FOOD WASTE WATER AIR

    6. hygiene washer Food System Water System Ultra Filtration Hygiene Water RO AES Brine Water Food Preparation Iodine Removal Bed VCD Monitoring Milli Q Pretreated Urine Food Trash ISE Monitoring MCV Iodine Plant Hab Pretreatment Oxone, Sulfuricacid Potable Water Atmosphere System Waste System Fecal Urine TCCA SPWE Vent to Mars Atm. H2 Compactor Atmospheric Condenser Solid Waste Storage EDC Compactor CO2 ECLSS System Overview

    7. Human Consumables • Atmosphere • O2 consumption: 0.85 kg/man-day [Eckart, 1996] • CO2 production: 1.0 kg/man-day [Eckart, 1996] • Leakage (14.7psi): 0.11 kgN2/day & 0.03 kgO2/day • Water • Potable 3 L/person/day [Larson, 1997] • 1.86 Food Preparation •1.14 Drink • Hygiene 18.5 L/person/day [Larson, 1997] • 5.5 Personal Hygiene •12.5 Laundry •0.5 Toilet Flush

    8. Human Consumables • Waste • Urine: 9.36 kg/day [Eckart, 1996] • Feces: 0.72 kg/day [Eckart, 1996] • Technology & Biomass 1.012 kg/day [Eckart, 1996] • Food • ~ 2,000 kCal per person per day [Miller, 1994]

    9. cabin leakage N2 O2, & H2O N2 storage tanks N2 O2 crew cabin SPWE H2 & O2 TCCA T&H control H2O EDC FDS To: trash compactor To: hygiene water tank To: vent From: H2O tank To: vent H2 H2O CO2 used filters & carbon H2O Atmosphere System Schematic Specifications • Fixed mass 1,965 kg • Consumable 4 kg/day • Power 3.5 kW

    10. Water System Schematic Specifications • Fixed mass 942.71 kg • Consumable (technologies) 0.36 kg/day • Power 2.01 kW

    11. commode urinal fecal storage feces urine solid waste storage compactor compactor From: TCCA food trash microfiltration VCD trash To: waste water tank H2O Waste System Schematic Specifications • Fixed mass 279 kg • Consumable 2.3 kg/day • Power 0.22 kW

    12. waste water H2O Salad Machine edible plant mass water inedible plant mass food preparation microwave food & drink food waste & packaging food storage To: trash compactor potable water H2O trash Food System Schematic Specifications • Fixed mass 1,320 kg • Consumable 4.5 kg/day • Power 3.4 kW

    13. Structures

    14. Habitat Layout Hatches/Airlocks: One at each end, on bottom floor Top Floor: personal space and crew accommodations 4 Radiators: One on each “corner” of Hab Bottom Floor: Lab, equipment, and airlocks Basement: Storage, equipment, supports and wheels

    15. Leakage • ISS Leakage – 1.24 kg/yr/m3 • Lunar Base Concept – 1.83 kg/yr/m3 • MOB Habitat – 530 m3 • Estimated Habitat Leakage – 657-791 kg/yr, or 1.24-1.49 kg/yr/m3 • Assume similar: • Differential pressure • Materials • Thickness of outer shell

    16. Future Tasks • Load analysis • Insulation • Shielding • Layout – more detail • Volume Allocation – more detail

    17. Thermal Control

    18. Current Status • Radiator panels sized for HOT - HOT scenario • Fluid pumps sized • Initial power usage estimated • Initial plumbing estimates • Initial total mass estimates • System schematics • Updated Level 2 Requirements

    19. Thermal I/O Diagram

    20. Thermal Schematic

    21. Requirement Must reject 25 KW (from Power system) Must cool each subsystem Must use a non-toxic interior fluid loop External fluid loop must not freeze Accommodating transit to Mars Design Rejects up to 40 KW via radiator panels Cold plates for heat collection from each subsystem Internal water fluid loop External TBD fluid loop During transit heat exchangers will connect to the transfer vehicle’s thermal system Thermal System Overview

    22. Thermal Components *Power is for two pumps in operation at one time, not six

    23. Future Tasks • Cold plates and sizing • External fluid loop • Heat exchangers • Radiator locations • Fluid storage • COLD - COLD scenario • Sensors/Data/Command structure • FMEA • Report

    24. Command, Control, Communication (C3)

    25. C3 Design Status • Qualitatively defined data flows • Created preliminary design based on data flows, mission requirements and existing systems • Command and Control System • Sizing and architecture based on ISS • Mass, power and volume breakdowns • Communications System • Sizing and architecture based on existing systems • Mass and power breakdowns • Assuming at least 1 Mars orbiting communications satellite

    26. ISRU Plant Nuclear Reactor Crew Mars Env’mt Earth Robotics & Automation Structure EVAS Mars Com Sat CCC C3 I/O Diagram Crew Accommodations ECLSS Legend Power ENERGY Packetized Data Telemetry/Data Command/Data Voice Video Electrical power Heat Thermal ISRU

    27. Command and Control System Comm System Tier 1 Command Computers (3) RF Hubs (3) User Terminals (6) Tier 1 Emergency Computer (1) Tier 2 Subsystem Computers (4) Tier 2 Science Computers (2) File Server (1) Tier 3 Subsystem Computers (8) Caution & Warning (?) C3 System Sensors Firmwire Controllers Experiments Other Systems Control System Diagram Legend Ethernet RF Connection Mil-Std 1553B Bus TBD

    28. Communications System Control Unit 1 meter diameter high gain (36 dB) antenna Amplifier Data from CCC Computers 1st Back-up Control Unit First Back-up Amplifier 2nd Back-up Control Unit Second Back-up Amplifier Backup 1 meter diameter high gain antenna 2nd Back-up EVA UHF Com 1st Back-up EVA UHF Com EVA UHF Com Medium gain (10 dB) antenna

    29. C3 Future Tasks • Quantify data flows and adjust preliminary design • Determine spare parts needs • Estimate cabling mass • Address total system mass overrun • Define maintenance and operational requirements • FMEA • Report

    30. Mission Operations and Crew Accommodations

    31. Current Status • Completed initial Functional Diagram for Crew Accommodations • Iterating lists of operations received for each subsystem • Crew Operations • Automated Operations • Earth Controlled Operations • Giving input to subsystems • Based on human factors considerations • Incorporating MSIS, Larson and Pranke, experience • Iterating mass, power, & volume parameters

    32. Crew Accommodations Functional Diagram

    33. Crew Accommodations Equipment

    34. Crew Accommodations Equipment Cont…

    35. Crew Accommodations Equipment Cont…

    36. Mission Operations Activities

    37. Future Tasks • Continue integration of human factors into subsystems • Create Data Flow Diagram • Create preliminary crew schedules • Equipment Maintenance • Housekeeping • Proficiency Training • Scientific Tasks • Programs/Paperwork • Personal Time • Integration with subsystems regarding resulting schedules

    38. Robotics and Automation

    39. Robotics and Automation • Number/Functions of rovers • Three classes of rovers • Small rover for scientific exploration • Medium rover for local transportation • Large pressurized rover for long exploration and infrastructure inspection • Power/Mass specs on all rovers • Power specs on robotic arms

    40. Robotics and Automation • Small Rover • Deploy scientific instruments for analysis and monitoring of Mars • Determine safe routes for crew travel • Collect and return samples • .64 kW power requirement • Calculated using data from Pathfinder • Solar arrays needed for power/recharging of batteries • Mass 440 kg

    41. Robotics and Automation • Local unpressurized rover • Transport crew up to 100 km • Operate continuously for up to 10 hours • Must transport crew as well as EVA tools • 2.8 kW power requirement • 14 hours charge time using 2 kW allocated power • Mass 4000 kg

    42. Robotics and Automation • Large pressurized rover • Must deploy and inspect infrasturcture • Power station, antennas, solar arrays, etc. • Nominal crew of two but must be able to carry four • Support 16 person hours of EVA per day • Will operate 2 mechanical arms from workstation or telerobotically • Uses separate power source • Ten day max work time • 500 km range • 10 kW power output • Mass 14000 kg

    43. Automation items (in progress) • Automated doors in case of depressurization • Deployment of habitat • Connection to power plant • Inspection of infrastructure • Site preparation • Communications hardware • External monitoring equipment • Deploy radiator panels • Deployment/Movement of scientific equipment

    44. Extra-Vehicular Activity Systems (EVAS)

    45. External Vehicular Activity Systems • EVAS is primarily responsible for providing the ability for individual crew members to move around and conduct useful tasks outside the pressurized habitat • EVA tasks will consist of constructing and maintaining habitat, and scientific investigation • EVAS broken up into 3 systems • EVA suit • Airlock • Pressurized Rover

    46. EVAS – EVA Suit • Critical functional elements: pressure shell, atmospheric and thermal control, communications, monitor and display, nourishment, and hygiene • Current suit is much too heavy and cumbersome to explore the Martian environment • ILC Dover is currently developing the I-Suit which is lighter, packable into a smaller volume, and has better mobility and dexterity

    47. EVAS – EVA Suit • I-Suit specs: • Soft upper-torso • 3.7 lbs/in2 (suit pressure can be varied) • Easier to tailor to each individual astronaut • ~65 lbs • Bearings at important rotational points • Greater visibility • Boots with tread for walking on Martian terrain • Parts are easily interchangeable (decrease number of spare parts needed)

    48. EVAS - Airlock • Independent element capable of being ‘plugged’ or relocated as mission requires • Airlock sized for three crew members with facilities for EVA suit maintenance and consumables servicing • There will be two airlocks each containing three EVA suits • Airlock will be a solid shell (opposed to inflatable) • The airlock will interface with the habitat through both an umbilical system and the hatch

    49. EVAS – Umbilical System • Connections from the habitat to the airlock and rover will be identical • Inputs from habitat to airlock/rover (through umbilical system) • Water (potable and non-potable) • Oxygen/Nitrogen • Data • Power • Outputs from airlock/rover to habitat (through umbilical system) • Waste water • Air • Data

    50. EVA – Pressurized Rover • Nominal crew of 2 – can carry 4 in emergency situations • Rover airlock capable of surface access and direct connection to habitat • Per day, rover can support 16 person hours of EVA • Work station – can operate 2 mechanical arms from shirt sleeve environment • Facilities for recharging portable LSS and minor repairs to EVA suit • The rover will interface with the habitat through both an umbilical system and the hatch