MLAB 1227- Coagulation Keri Brophy-Martinez - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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MLAB 1227- Coagulation Keri Brophy-Martinez

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  1. MLAB 1227- CoagulationKeri Brophy-Martinez Secondary Hemostasis Part One

  2. Coagulation system is kept in balance by activators and inhibitors of clotting and fibrinolysis. Clotting occurs when blood vessels are damaged and activators of coagulation factors are released. Clotting is controlled by fibrinolysis. Inhibitors serve to bring the system back into balance.

  3. Review • Primary hemostasis • Unstable platelet plug formed • Secondary hemostasis • Reinforced platelet plug with fibrin clot • Enzyme-mediated, cascade-like reactions • End result = insoluble fibrin clot

  4. Theory of Blood Coagulation • Classic theory (early 1900's) states that blood remains fluid in the absence of thromboplastin • In the presence of thromboplastin and calcium, a factor in the blood, prothrombin, is converted to thrombin • Thrombin then acts upon another blood factor, fibrinogen, and converts it to fibrin, which is the final product of coagulation • Cascade/Domino /Waterfall Theory: • Coagulation factors are converted to active forms by the preceding factor in a series of biochemical reactions.

  5. In a nutshell.. Prothrombinthromboplastinthrombin Ca ++ Fibrinogen thrombinfibrin

  6. Terms • Zymogen • Also called procoagulant or proenzyme • Inactive circulating coagulation factor precursor • Functions • Serves as the first substrate for the preceding enzyme in the cascade • Once activated, becomes an enzyme for the following zymogen

  7. Coagulation Mechanism (In vitro):Intrinsic, Extrinsic, Common: • Initiation consists of 2 pathways • Intrinsic • Requires enzymes and protein co-factors present in the plasma • Extrinsic • Requires enzymes and protein co-factors present in the plasma plus an activator (tissue factor= TF) • TF is not found in blood under normal conditions • Common: the third pathway • Location of generation of fibrin clot

  8. Coagulation Cascade

  9. Breakdown of Factor Location

  10. Classification of Coagulation Factors • Based on functional or structural properties • Physical groupings • Prothrombin • Fibrinogen • Contact • Functional Groupings • Substrate • Cofactors • Enzyme

  11. Physical Groupings

  12. Prothrombin Group • II, VII, IX, X • Protein C, Protein S, Protein Z • Vitamin K dependent • Synthesized in liver • Small mw (50,000-100,000) • Contain a domain that is critical for calcium binding • Heat stable • Inhibited by warfarin

  13. Fibrinogen group • I, V, VIII, XIII • Thrombin acts on all these factors • Synthesized in liver • Exception: VIII:vWF which is produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes • Large mw (250,000) • ALL are consumed in the clotting process, since they are NOT enzymes

  14. Contact Group • XI, XII, HMWK(HK), PK • Produced in liver • Activated upon contact with a negatively charged surface • Collagen in vivo • Glass, Kaolin in vitro • Large mw (80,000-173,000) • Not consumed in coagulation, found in serum • Purpose: activate the intrinsic pathway & fibrinolytic system

  15. Functional Groupings • Substrates: substance upon which enzymes act • Factor I:fibrinogen • Cofactors: speed up the activities of enzymes • (i.e) Factor V: Proaccelerin • Enzymes • Transglutaminase • Factor XIIIa only • Serine protease • Inactive until converted to enzymes • Once activated, assist in reaction, but are not consumed or used up

  16. What’s so Special About Vitamin K? • Where does it come from? • Green leafy vegetables, fish and liver • Gram-negative intestinal bacteria • What does it do? • Vitamin K is necessary for the carboxylation of glutamic acid. Carboxylation is essential for binding coagulation factors to negatively-charged phospholipid surfaces via Ca++ bridges. Carboxylation reactions also reduce vitamin K to be recycled.

  17. What’s so Special About Vitamin K? • Why do we care? • Vitamin K antagonist drugs such as warfin/coumadin inhibit the activity of the recycling of Vitamin K, so the reduced form can not be made • Deficiencies of Vitamin K result in the production of non-functional factors which can not participate in coagulation reactions

  18. References • McKenzie, Shirlyn B., and J. Lynne. Williams. "Chapter 30." Clinical Laboratory Hematology. Boston: Pearson, 2010. Print.