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Luton Construction Alliance CDM/H&S Seminar PowerPoint Presentation
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Luton Construction Alliance CDM/H&S Seminar

Luton Construction Alliance CDM/H&S Seminar

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Luton Construction Alliance CDM/H&S Seminar

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  1. Luton Construction AllianceCDM/H&S Seminar

  2. Agenda Welcome addressDevelopment Control / CDM / H&S issues for schoolsQuestionsLuton Construction Alliance presentationQuestions

  3. Do works require Planning permission? Development Control • Do works require building Regulation approval?

  4. CDM (Construction Design and Management regulations)- Issues for Schools

  5. What is CDM 2007Key Aim of CDM 2007Brief background to CDM regulationsWho is a clientRole of client Duties of clientSummary Introduction

  6. The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007Revoked Regulations:Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996 What is CDM?

  7. What is CDM? The key aim of CDM2007 is to integrate health and safety into the management of the project and to encourage everyone involved to work togetherto: (a) improve the planning and management of projects from the very start; (b) identify hazards early on, so they can be eliminated or reduced at the design or planning stage and the remaining risks can be properly managed; (c) target effort where it can do the most good in terms of health and safety; and (d) discourage unnecessary bureaucracy.

  8. Background to Regulations Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 1994 implemented key aspects of a construction European DirectiveIdentified the need to reduce risk by better co-ordination, management and co-operationFor the first time the duties on clients and designers were made more explicitCDM 94 led to a major change in how the industry managed health and safety

  9. Who is a Client? A client is an individual or organisation who in the course or furtherance of a business, has a construction project carried out by another or by themselves.

  10. Role of Clients under CDM 2007 (1) Make clients accountable for the impact they have on health and safetyClients should make sure things are done, not do them themselvesTo use a CDM co-ordinator to advise and co-ordinate activities on notifiable projectsTo ensure enough time and resource is provided to allow the project to be delivered safely

  11. Role of Clients under CDM 2007 (2) A change in attitude is needed to deliver the much needed improvements in construction health and safetyA ‘business as usual’ approach is not acceptableIndustry needs to take ownership of the management of health and safety risks, show leadership and work in partnershipFocus on effective planning and managing riskEnsure people are competentReduce bureaucracy & paperwork

  12. Duties on Clients CDM regulations apply to all construction workClients have duties in two areas of CDM 1 – Non notifiable projects (under 30 days or 500 man days) 2 – Notifiable projects (more than 30 days)

  13. Duties on Clients – all projects Ensure suitable management arrangements are in place Type and level of checks needed depends on the work being undertaken and the risks involvedEnsure adequate welfare facilities are on siteEnsure workplaces are designed correctly a design for a workplace should comply with Workplace (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations 1992

  14. Duties on Clients – notifiable projects Appoint competent CDM co-ordinatorProvide CDM co-ordinator with key informationAppoint a competent principal contractorEnsure the construction phase does not start unless there is; Suitable welfare facilities provided Construction phase health and safety planRetain and provide access to the health and safety file and revise it with any new information

  15. Summary What is CDM 2007Construction Design & Management RegsKey Aim of CDM 2007Integrate H&S into management of projectsBrief background to CDM regulations EU Directive, better co-ordination, management and co- operationWho is a client?Anyone who commissions construction workRole of client AccountabilityDuties of clientNon Notifiable and Notifiable projects

  16. Premises Related Health and Safety update.-Issues for Schools

  17. Health & Safety Legislation Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 19992 The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1992 (PUWER) Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006 Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 Reporting Injuries, Disease and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)

  18. Health & Safety Legislation Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 19992 The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1992 (PUWER)Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 Reporting Injuries, Disease and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)

  19. Health & Safety Legislation Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 19992 The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1992 (PUWER) Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005Reporting Injuries, Disease and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)

  20. Health & Safety Legislation Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 19992 The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1992 (PUWER) Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005Reporting Injuries, Disease and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)

  21. Maintaining fixed installations Fire extinguishers, service annually, 5 yearly discharge and refill, 20 year renewal ** Fixed wire testing (FWT) 5 yearly **Portable appliance testing, annually advisoryFire alarms, weekly testing, 6 monthly service **Emergency lighting, monthly testing, 6 monthly service **Security alarm, 6 monthly serviceVentilation systems, shall be maintained including cleaning **Water systems, weekly monitor, bi annual risk assessments **Air conditioning, should be regularly cleaned tested and maintained ** NB **= Legislative requirements

  22. Maintaining fixed installations Thermostatic mixing valves (TMV’s) check discharge temperatures, monitor and service Thermostatic radiator valves, no operating regulations, suggest monitored to protect vulnerable personsGas fired boilers, service annually **Oil fired boilers, service in accordance with the manufacturers instructionsOil tanks, annual inspection **Pressurisation vessels, 6 monthly **Mechanical doors, roller shutters and exit barriers, 6 monthly **Lifts, quarterly inspections/service ** NB **= Legislative requirements

  23. Finally…… • STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 2007 No 991The Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations 2007Part 3 Display Energy Certificates (DEC’s)

  24. Thank youQuestions

  25. LCA - Luton Construction Alliance- Services to schools

  26. Partnering in Practice Building Construction & Maintenance Neil O’Connor Capital & Asset Management and Luton Construction Alliance

  27. Agenda • Background – traditional tendering • Government challenge • Why is partnering important • Luton’s partnering strategy and framework • Results so far • Key messages • Questions

  28. Traditional Contracting Problems • Tender every scheme irrespective of value, slow, costly and bureaucratic and wasted valuable resources • Select on lowest price - risk created by the use of fixed tendered rates does not encourage quality workmanship or good relationships • A slow process for getting projects on site and hence completed • Little incentive to perform well as the next project will still be tendered

  29. Traditional Contracting Problems • Insufficient resource planning • Unable to involve the constructor at the planning and design stage • Different designer/ constructor teams on each project • Does not encourage flexibility or innovation • Little incentive to develop new ways of working which reduce costs/improve systems/processes etc • No collaborative working on local employment / environmental issues

  30. Typical Results of the Traditional Approach • Poor customer satisfaction • Delays and cost overruns • Variable construction quality / high defects

  31. Government Recommendations • Key elements of the new procurement regimes for Local Authorities should be: • Strategic partnerships and framework agreements • Partnering with shared profit/loss • Integrated design and construction teams including clients, contractors, designers and suppliers • Quality of service and product to be critical success factors • Whole life cost appraisals to form an integral part of the process to include all future running and maintenance costs

  32. Why Partnering is Important? • In the Council’s and its community’s best interest better cost certainty, higher quality and better value • It is being used by Government Departments which will increasingly tie grant issues to its use • Its use will be considered in annual Council assessments (CPA rating) • It can assist with local employment development • Meets with the drive for sustainability

  33. New Developments in Constructor Selection • More long term partnerships, therefore a more robust selection process • More emphasis on quality not price (70/30%) • Increased use of open-book payment systems • More flexible contracts and specifications • More emphasis on social inclusion • More emphasis on IT capability • Greater control of the supply chain

  34. Luton’s Partnering Strategy… • Core Objectives: • Improved cost and time predictability • Higher quality and fewer defects • Fewer disputes • Reduced accidents • Increased customer satisfaction • Better whole life value • Better use of scarce resources

  35. Luton’s Construction Framework – July 07 • Partnerships will last 4years with extension option: • Work categories: • Major New Build and Refurbishments: £250k - £2m • Borras Construction and Jarvis Contracting • Other New Build and Refurbishments: £50k - £250k • Borras Construction, Jarvis Contracting & • Building and Technical Services

  36. Luton’s Maintenance Framework – Nov. 07 • Partnerships will last 4years with extension option: • Work categories: • Building & Electrical repairs: All values • Building and Technical Services • Service Contracts & Mechanical: All values • Jarvis Contracting

  37. Why Clients like Partnering • Know who will be working with • Constructor part of the team ( better understanding of client issues and priorities) • Projects on site and completed sooner • More consistent construction quality • Incentives to make savings and perhaps reinvest them to produce a better building • Joint working on key issues • Better use of resources

  38. Why Constructors like Partnering • Guaranteed many years work ( without having to tender) if performance standards remain high • Part of work programming meetings • Paid actual cost • Share savings • Part of the team • Can show they are contributing to the local economy

  39. Results so far • Better risk allocation & management • Improved time & cost certainty • Joint working…. • Safe sites with good welfare facilities • Earlier settlement of final accounts – no retention • Projects started on site earlier than traditional method • Benefiting from consistent design / constructor teams • Undertaking better resource planning

  40. Results so far…….projects • Refurbishment of Academies – Barnfield South & West • Foxdell Infants School – Children’s Centre • Pastures Way Nursery – extension • Elderly Persons Homes - refurbishment • Central Offices – refurbishment • Bus Station – demolition • Maintenance projects – windows, boilers, electrical wiring

  41. Key Messages • Commitment to the following is vital: • Team working & long term relationships • Early project involvement/ helping to innovate • High construction quality and treatment of sub contractors/suppliers • Open access to cost information • Training and recruiting local people • Use of IT systems • The environment eg waste management • Continuous improvement

  42. A Final Thought • Realising you are changing cultures not contractors or procurement • At an early stage and still learning….. • It’s not an easy option – but worth doing

  43. Thank youQuestions and Discussion

  44. Engaging with Schools • L2G website • Brochures • Case studies • Visits to schools