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Boys Vs. Girls

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Boys Vs. Girls

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  1. Boys Vs. Girls How boys and girls learn differently

  2. Overview • Brain differences • Effects of Hormones • Learning Strategies • Statistics • Conclusion

  3. The Female Brain • Matures earlier • Speak in sentences earlier • Broca’s area & frontal lobe are more active • Improved verbal communication • Cerebrum is always active • Greater ability to multi-task • Copus callosum is larger • Coordinate the two sides of their brain better • ** Better at listening and communicating

  4. The Male Brain • Amygdale is larger • More aggressive behavior • Cerebral cortex is thicker on right side • Better at solving abstract problems • More developed right hemisphere • Better at measuring and using models • ** Better at problem solving and building projects

  5. Female Hormones • Progesterone & Estrogen • Make females bond more easily • Fluctuation creates moodiness

  6. Male Hormone • Testosterone • Aggressive • Socially ambitious • Muscular

  7. Learning Strategies for Girls • Visual learners • Use pictures and charts • Verbal learners • Enjoy talking and discussing topics • Less likely to take risks • Need to be encouraged

  8. Learning Strategies for Boys • Kinesthetic learners • Like to be active while learning • Like numbers and symbols • Like to decipher codes, solve pattern games and use formulas to solve problems

  9. Statistics • Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s • Boys account for 2/3 of the learning disability diagnoses • Boys represent 90% of the discipline referrals • 80% of high school dropouts are male • Males make up fewer than 40% of the college students • (Gurian, 2001)

  10. Observations of female students • Girls like background information • Girls like story problems • Girls are more concerned with pleasing adults. • Girls have more concern for their grade

  11. Observations of Boys • Boys get bored easily • Boys like to solve equations instead of reading story problems • Confrontation works well with boys • Boys respond well to noisy classrooms

  12. Conclusion • Boys and Girls learn differently • Educators need to be aware of these differences • Create classrooms that are conducive to all learners • Consider single sex classrooms at the junior high level

  13. Bibliography • Boys vs. girls: Slimming the online gender gap. (2004). Retrieved Feb. 1, 2006, from Xplanazine Web site: http://www.xplanazine.com/archives/2004/06/boys_vs_girls_s_1.php. • Conner, M.L. (1997-2004). Introduction to learning styles. Retrieved form the Ageless Learner Web site: http://agelesslearner.com/intros/lstyleintro.html • Gender differences in learning. (n.d.). Retrieved Jan. 30, 2006, from Equal Opportunities Commission Web site: http://www.eoc.org.hk/TE/edu/gendiff/ • Gurian, M., & Henley, P. (2001). Boys and girls learn differently! Guide for teachers and parents. 1st ed. SanFrancisco: Jossey-Bass. • Gurian, M., & Stevens, K. (2004). With boys and girls in mind. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development,62, 21-26. • Jobe, D. A. (2002). Helping girls succeed. Educational Leadership,60, 64-70. • Kurtz, S. (2005). Can we make boys and girls alike?. City Journal, 15. Retrieved Feb 1, 2006, from city-journal web site: http://www.city-journal.org/html/15_2_boys_girls.html • Partnership for Learning, (n.d.). Learning styles, learning differences. Retrieved Jan. 30, 2006, from Partnership for Learning Web site: http://www.partnershipforlearning.org/category.asp?CategoryID=20 • Peterson, S. (2004). Supporting boys' and girls' literacy learning. Orbit, 34(1), 33-35. • Pomerantz, E., Saxon, J. (2001). Conceptions of abilities stable and self-evaluative processes: a longitudinal examination. Child Development. 72, 152-173. • Sax, L. (2005). Why gender matters. What parents and teachers need to know about the emerging science of sex differences (1st ed.). US: DoubleDay. • Taylor, D., Lorimer, M. (2002).Helping boys succeed. Educational Leadership. 60(4), 68-70.