Download
using educational video games to encourage behaviour change n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Using educational video games to encourage behaviour change. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Using educational video games to encourage behaviour change.

Using educational video games to encourage behaviour change.

164 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Using educational video games to encourage behaviour change.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Using educational video games to encourage behaviour change. Coventry University Masters project By Michael Richards

  2. contents • Introduction • Aims of CSEC • Videogames • Educational videogames (I-III) • Procedural knowledge • Conceptual knowledge • Our game (I-V) • Future Development

  3. Introduction • Michael Richards • Studying a Masters by research in engineering and knowledge management at Coventry University. • My project is aimed at designing an educational video game to help young children learn about hazard avoidance and personal safety.

  4. Aims of csec • To encourage and support activities which contribute to a reduction in unintended injuries to children and young people. • Identify common and avoidable injuries to children and young people. • Identify activities where practical safety education could be improved, extended or introduced. • Provide children with opportunities to develop risk competence appropriate to their age and developmental stage, which is transferable to all aspects of their lives. • Enable children and young people to have the confidence put their risk competence into practice.

  5. Videogames • A brief history of the videogame: • `Spacewar’. • Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). • Core aspect of modern culture. • Potential educational tool.

  6. Educational videogames i • Not a new area of study. • Academic subjects. • Obvious teaching approach. • Behavioural teaching game. • Subtle learning approach. • Hypothesis construction and testing.

  7. Educational videogames ii • Fun to play. • Allows repetition. • Conceptual Vs. Procedural learning.

  8. Procedural knowledge • The knowledge of actions. • Can be limiting. • Want children to learn appropriate actions via their knowledge, not just a procedure. • Conceptual knowledge. • Better understanding of all aspects.

  9. Conceptual knowledge • Exposure over multiple scenarios. • Allows for better understanding of an artefacts characteristics. • More valuable than learning predetermined procedures. • More feasible to include concepts than all procedures in a game.

  10. Educational videogames iii • Flow Experience. • Involved state of play. • Pursuit of achievement. • Heightened brain function & memory recall. • Potential for increased knowledge retention within educational video games. • Theory of Self Determination. • Providing tasks to encourage players. • Wanting to master an aspect of a game. • Can be used to encourage Flow Experience. • Both are difficult to achieve!

  11. Our game i • Relevant information being taught. • Home Accident Surveillance Survey (HASS) • Leisure Accident Surveillance Survey (LASS) • Constructed a scoring system based on hazard likelihood and severity. • Players interact with data without knowledge of doing so.

  12. Our game ii • Design of the game. • Colourful. • Fun. • Mixed gender cartoon characters. • Rapid development lifecycle led to card game design rather than electronic. • Allows for more testing and development of play style and mechanics before going electronic.

  13. Our game iii • Scoring system based on hazard likelihood and severity. • (Likelihood x Severity /10) • (below) Scores of each hazard depending on situation.

  14. Our game iv • Card game style of play. • Turn based structure. • Allows for repetition. • Repetition increases exposure to a larger amount of hazard and action combinations. • More chances to make positive and negative decisions. • Increases conceptual knowledge.

  15. Our game v • Feedback through scoring codex. • Feedback enhances learning. • Scores used to reinforce good decisions (high points) and highlight bad decisions (low/no points). • This method of feedback is designed to make the player think about the possible consequences before they take an action; this encapsulates the behaviour we intend to encourage young children to adopt.

  16. Future development • Make the game electronic. • Similar game design. • Increase exposure. • Easily updateable with new content.

  17. Thank you for listening.