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Why is it Essential

Why is it Essential

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Why is it Essential

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    1. Research and Planning & Student Services 2006 Why is it Essential?

    2. Presentation Overview Why have a Student Retention Strategy? What are the purposes of the Strategy? Discussion . . .

    3. Certificate Programs Retention

    4. Diploma Students Retention

    5. Impact Students Loss of financial investment Career confusion Decreased confidence & loss of self concept Lower employment outcomes College Loss of revenue Negative perceptions of the college Province Lower return on educational funding Less educated work force

    6. Manitoba Educational Attainment Rate. Education attainment increase the lower the age group for both colleges and universities. 25-34 year-olds = 52.8% that between 60-80 per cent of new jobs will be demanding at least some form of postsecondary education. As the knowledge economy evolves the need for postsecondary education is likely to increase further still. This, in turn, will mean participation rates and student success rates will have to increase. Key parts of the strategy should include: Improving access to applied educational opportunities Improving pathways from high school to college Expanding and renew opportunities for apprenticeship training Improving access for specific populations, including aboriginal, special needs, new Canadians, rural and low-income students; and Increasing the options for immigrants with credentials from other countries to qualify them for employment in their fields. Colleges will be a key player in Manitoba's achieving this goal. The postsecondary sector will have to attract, support, retain and graduate many persons whose demographics have traditionally ensured they would never enter the postsecondary education system. College expertise in remedial and preparatory training could, and should, be leveraged to great effect for the province in educating these segments.Education attainment increase the lower the age group for both colleges and universities. 25-34 year-olds = 52.8% that between 60-80 per cent of new jobs will be demanding at least some form of postsecondary education. As the knowledge economy evolves the need for postsecondary education is likely to increase further still. This, in turn, will mean participation rates and student success rates will have to increase. Key parts of the strategy should include: Improving access to applied educational opportunities Improving pathways from high school to college Expanding and renew opportunities for apprenticeship training Improving access for specific populations, including aboriginal, special needs, new Canadians, rural and low-income students; and Increasing the options for immigrants with credentials from other countries to qualify them for employment in their fields. Colleges will be a key player in Manitoba's achieving this goal. The postsecondary sector will have to attract, support, retain and graduate many persons whose demographics have traditionally ensured they would never enter the postsecondary education system. College expertise in remedial and preparatory training could, and should, be leveraged to great effect for the province in educating these segments.

    7. Manitoba Youth Education Attainment

    8. Unemployment rates for graduates Knowledge based economy requires skilled people Now, 70% of new jobs require some postsecondary education (HRDC) Looming demographic crunch Ageing population Learning system needs to be strengthened Canada is 15th in adult learning participation (OECD) Foundation economy requirements Skilled trades shortages Knowledge based economy requires skilled people Now, 70% of new jobs require some postsecondary education (HRDC) Looming demographic crunch Ageing population Learning system needs to be strengthened Canada is 15th in adult learning participation (OECD) Foundation economy requirements Skilled trades shortages

    9. Graduates Productivity Effects As shown here, the direct effect of RCCs students is $866.6 million in higher regional income, plus an additional $159.5 million in associated multiplier effects. This is quite impressive, especially considering the fact that this is RCCs annual contribution to the regional economy. In other words, without the productivity of RCCs students, total income in the region would be that much lower. Annual. Estimates the CHEs embodied in the regional workforce 1976. Note here the emphasis on income as opposed to earnings. This would include all dividends, interests and rents generated in the local economy, as well earnings. Not externalities of impact on innovation and technical progress. Employers would not hire educated workers and pay higher wages if doing so were not profitable. Educated workers earn more because businesses earn more by hiring them. The students earn more because the skills learned at the college makes them more productive. Importantly, as they apply their new skills, capital (buildings, machinery and everything else) is also made more productive and profits and other property income increase.[1] Together, the combined labor and capital income effect might be considered the direct income effect of a skilled workforce. There are also indirect effects. Educated workers have higher incomes and therefore more money to spend on consumer goods. At the same time the businesses that employ the higher skilled workers produce more, which in turn, requires an increase in inputs and input spending. The effect of these two spending items (consumer spending and business spending) is to increase overall income in the economy, which leads to still more spending and more income creation, and so on. [1] In the production process, skilled labor and capital complement each other (in technical language, they have a relatively low elasticity of substitution). Accordingly, an increase in skilled labor will increase the productivity and income of existing capital, while encouraging additional capital investment. As shown here, the direct effect of RCCs students is $866.6 million in higher regional income, plus an additional $159.5 million in associated multiplier effects. This is quite impressive, especially considering the fact that this is RCCs annual contribution to the regional economy. In other words, without the productivity of RCCs students, total income in the region would be that much lower. Annual. Estimates the CHEs embodied in the regional workforce 1976. Note here the emphasis on income as opposed to earnings. This would include all dividends, interests and rents generated in the local economy, as well earnings. Not externalities of impact on innovation and technical progress. Employers would not hire educated workers and pay higher wages if doing so were not profitable. Educated workers earn more because businesses earn more by hiring them. The students earn more because the skills learned at the college makes them more productive. Importantly, as they apply their new skills, capital (buildings, machinery and everything else) is also made more productive and profits and other property income increase.[1] Together, the combined labor and capital income effect might be considered the direct income effect of a skilled workforce. There are also indirect effects. Educated workers have higher incomes and therefore more money to spend on consumer goods. At the same time the businesses that employ the higher skilled workers produce more, which in turn, requires an increase in inputs and input spending. The effect of these two spending items (consumer spending and business spending) is to increase overall income in the economy, which leads to still more spending and more income creation, and so on. [1] In the production process, skilled labor and capital complement each other (in technical language, they have a relatively low elasticity of substitution). Accordingly, an increase in skilled labor will increase the productivity and income of existing capital, while encouraging additional capital investment.

    10. In the Knowledge Economy Education is Essential Knowledge based economy requires skilled people Now, 70% of new jobs require some postsecondary education (HRDC) Looming demographic crunch Ageing population Learning system needs to be strengthened Canada is 15th in adult learning participation (OECD) Foundation economy requirements Skilled trades shortages

    11. Research and Planning & Student Services 2006 What are the purposes of the Strategy?

    12. Goals Increase student retention and success. Understand the college-specific determinants of first-term student success and retention. Promote the efficient and effective use of college resources.

    13. Student Development Models Neurological Development of the brain and learning Mustard, Phillips & Shonkoff Cognitive-Structural Understanding the world Piaget, Perry Psychosocial Achieving identity Erikson, Chickering McCain & Mustard (1999), The Early Years Report Phillips & Shonkoff, 2000 Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development, which marshaled evidence from numerous fields showing that human development is shaped by a dynamic and continuous interaction between biology and experience. Neurons to Neighborhoods took a balanced view, confirming that "human development is shaped by a dynamic and continuous interaction between biology and experience" and that young children's development "is shaped by the ongoing interplay among sources of vulnerability and sources of resilience." Rethinking the Brain: New Insights into Early Development (Revised 10/03) Rima Shore, 1997. Piaget (1947) The Construction of Reality in the Child originally trained in the areas of biology and philosophy and considered himself a "genetic epistemologist." He was mainly interested in the biological influences on "how we come to know." He believed that what distinguishes human beings from other animals is our ability to do "abstract symbolic reasoning While Piaget chronicles development of ability to use logical thinking, William G. Perry, Jr., has chronicled the evolution of beliefs about what constitutes knowledge, truth, and fact, and the role of authorities in defining and conveying knowledge. Perry, W. G., Jr., Forms of Intellectual and Ethical Development in the College Years: A Scheme, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, 1970. Erikson's view is that the social environment combined with biological maturation provides each individual with a set of "crises" that must be resolved. The individual is provided with a "sensitive period" in which to successfully resolve each crisis before a new crisis is presented. The results of the resolution, whether successful or not, are carried forward to the next crisis and provide the foundation for its resolution. Identity: Youth and Crisis Arthur Chickering, A. W. (1993). Education and identity (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Josey-Bass. Seven Vectors of College Student Development: Developing Competence , Managing Emotions, Moving through Autonomy toward Interdependence, Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships, Establishing Identity, Developing Purpose, Developing IntegrityMcCain & Mustard (1999), The Early Years Report Phillips & Shonkoff, 2000 Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development, which marshaled evidence from numerous fields showing that human development is shaped by a dynamic and continuous interaction between biology and experience. Neurons to Neighborhoods took a balanced view, confirming that "human development is shaped by a dynamic and continuous interaction between biology and experience" and that young children's development "is shaped by the ongoing interplay among sources of vulnerability and sources of resilience." Rethinking the Brain: New Insights into Early Development (Revised 10/03)Rima Shore, 1997. Piaget (1947) The Construction of Reality in the Child originally trained in the areas of biology and philosophy and considered himself a "genetic epistemologist." He was mainly interested in the biological influences on "how we come to know." He believed that what distinguishes human beings from other animals is our ability to do "abstract symbolic reasoning While Piaget chronicles development of ability to use logical thinking, William G. Perry, Jr., has chronicled the evolution of beliefs about what constitutes knowledge, truth, and fact, and the role of authorities in defining and conveying knowledge. Perry, W. G., Jr., Forms of Intellectual and Ethical Development in the College Years: A Scheme, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, 1970. Erikson's view is that the social environment combined with biological maturation provides each individual with a set of "crises" that must be resolved. The individual is provided with a "sensitive period" in which to successfully resolve each crisis before a new crisis is presented. The results of the resolution, whether successful or not, are carried forward to the next crisis and provide the foundation for its resolution. Identity: Youth and Crisis Arthur Chickering, A. W. (1993). Education and identity (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Josey-Bass. Seven Vectors of College Student Development: Developing Competence , Managing Emotions, Moving through Autonomy toward Interdependence, Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships, Establishing Identity, Developing Purpose, Developing Integrity

    14. Lots Happening to Our Students Establishing their identity Building relationships Clarifying future careers Developing a more sophisticated understanding of their world Developing abstract reasoning Developing values and ethics Working & managing family responsibilities Trying to have fun Learning skills, developing knowledge

    15. Determinants of Learning Verbal, Quantitative and Subject Matter Competence Individualized instruction produces greater gains Cognitive Skills and Intellectual Growth Growth directly related to student involvement in college academic and social life Identity, Self-Concept and Self-Esteem Development influenced by student involvement in academic and social systems of college Relating to Others and the External World Evidence for the importance of interaction with faculty & peers Attitudes and Values Evidence that change is due to college experiences: Interpersonal associations students have with faculty and peers

    16. A Key Issue is Student Diversity Needs Finance, child care, career guidance, disability Abilities Literacy, numeracy, learning skills, computer skills Attitudes Confidence, career certainty, perceived value of PSE Behaviors Study habits, Class attendance, homework completion Travel time to college Work commitment Family comments.

    17. Parents Level of Education for RRC Students Parents of RRC students are more likely to have less education than parents of students of students at other colleges.Parents of RRC students are more likely to have less education than parents of students of students at other colleges.

    18. Research and Planning & Student Services 2006 Basis of the Strategy?

    19. Student Success Conceptualized within Tinto's "person-environment fit" model of educational outcomes and derived from empirical research on student success and departure Student involvement & integration Institutional structure and function Attention to individual learners Learning community Conceptualized within Tinto's "person-environment fit" model of educational outcomes and derived from empirical research on student success and departure Student involvement & integration Institutional structure and function Attention to individual learners Learning community

    20. A Model of Educational Outcomes

    21. Development Work is Required Administration of the system Fielding Data entry, analysis and reporting Distributing reports Questionnaire review and customization Reports review and customization Intervention strategies Faculty advising Student service support Communities of practice

    22. Red River College ..Going Places .....