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Using Interactive Science Journals to Encourage Reflection, Thought and Positive Attitude

Using Interactive Science Journals to Encourage Reflection, Thought and Positive Attitude

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Using Interactive Science Journals to Encourage Reflection, Thought and Positive Attitude

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  1. Using Interactive Science Journals to Encourage Reflection, Thought and Positive Attitude UTD-SCE 5305 Dara Williams Rossi December 2, 2003

  2. Introduction • Thinking and writing about science engages the learner • Written explanation of what they think forces clarity and organization (Azimirara, Bletterman, & Romero, n.d.) • “Thinking is the method of intelligent learning”. (Dewey, 1916, p.153)

  3. Why Are Journals Important • Vital function of scientists in any discipline is to recording information, data and figures (Gray, 1988) • Journals are a means of reference and resource (Hyers, 2001) • Communication tool between teacher/parent

  4. Importance Continued • Unique means of assessment/growth (Young, 2003) • Give the opportunity to think, reason, show creativity, and practice skills to promote long-term leaning (Holt, 2003) • Current tools not successful

  5. Strategy • Give students a TOSRA pre-survey • Set up the journal (input right/output left) • Bound journal with no paper removed • Give students a TOSRA post-survey • Compare the two classes (grades/surveys)

  6. Conclusion • Shift our philosophy • From skill-based • To whole education • Move the educator from dispenser to facilitator and allow student to reflect on their own learning • Cognitive process more important than a grade • Create critical thinkers with interactive journals

  7. References Archambault, Reginald D., ed. (1974). John Dewey on Education-Selected Writings. Chicago: U of Chicago Press. Azimioara, M., Bletterman, C., & Romero, P., (n.d.). Another approach to the scientific notebook. A Collection of Articles and Rubrics. Trustin School District: Calif. Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and Education: An intro to the Philosophy of Education. New York: Free Press. Egan, Kieran. (1997).The Educated Mind, How Cognitive Tools Shape Our Understanding. Chicago: U of Chicago Press. Frase, Larry & Streshleym W. (2000). Top 10 Myths in Education. Lanham: Scarecrow Press. Gray, D. (1988). Writing across the college curriculum. Phi Delta Kappan 69(10), pp.729-733. Gross, Martin. (1999). The Conspiracy of Ignorance, The Failure of American Public Schools. Harper Collins: New York. Kinchin, I., & Hay, D. (2000). How a qualitative approach to concept map analysiscan be used to aid learning by illustrating. Educational Research, 42(1), pp.43-57.

  8. References Continued Holt, T., (Nov. 2003) Problem based learning: the nature of a good problem solver. Texas Science Education Monthly, pp1-2. Hyers, A. (2001) Predictable achievement patterns for student journals in introductory earth science courses. Journal of Geography in Higher Education. 25(1), pp 53-66. Reed, Ronald and Tony Johnson, ed. (2000). Philosophical Documents in Education, 2nd ed. New York: Addison-Wesley Longman. State Assessment. (2000) http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/about/state.asp Shepardson, D. & Britsch, S. (Nov. 2000) Analyzing children’s science journals. Science and Children, pp.29-33. Wells, Gordon (2000) Changing Schools from Within—Creating Communities. Toronto:OISE Press. Young, J. (2003). Science interactive notebooks in the classroom. Science Scope, pp.44-57.

  9. Exit Stage Right The End