Senior Project Research and Reflection Paper Due March 1 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Senior Project Research and Reflection Paper Due March 1

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  1. Senior Project Research and Reflection PaperDue March 1

  2. Senior Project Research Paper

  3. Remember these major guidelines for your paper: • The paper should be related to the performance or understanding of your Sr. Project. • The paper should be minimum1000 words in length, typed in a standard 10 or 12 point font following MLA style. (1000 words will not impress the community board on May 2.) • 3-5 sources should be used.

  4. If you need more detailed help creating your research paper, read “Reporting Literary Research” in your Holt Literature and Language Arts textbook (pp 204-223).

  5. If your paper has any of the following problems, you will receive an automatic ZERO: 1) no “works cited” page 2) no citations within the paper 3) using wikipedia.com. 4) Plagiarism • The rubric for grading is also a link on my handouts page.

  6. Here is the rubric that will be used to grade your paper. Obviously, it’s too small to read. The following slides reflect the information on the rubric with extra detail given when necessary.

  7. Focus • You have asked a central question and series of minor questions that required you to search out sources of information in books, journals, magazines and newspapers. You may also have added on a source from the world wide web, a personal interview, broadcast, or other source of information. Each of the series of minor questions that derive from the central question should be addressed in a paragraph or paragraph bloc. Nothing should be extraneous. • A good title focuses our attention.1 2 3 4 5

  8. Focus • Focus: The essay provides a connection to the volunteer hours you chose and served. • This paper is called an “I-Search” or “We-search” paper. The first paragraph should be personal. What service did you choose for your project? How did this service lead to your major question? • The second and following paragraphs where you begin to answer your questions should then switch to third person so the paper sounds authoritative.

  9. Example Intro Paragraph It was my fifth day of service at Natomas Park Elementary School, and I was beginning to become familiar with the students by name. One student in particular who was being tutored in language arts, had really caught my attention. He was having significant trouble comprehending the books that we were reading together. I began to wonder what steps I could take to help him read better. What were the most important skills necessary for being a good reader? I discovered that visualizing the text, stopping to check for understanding, and using context clues to define words that were unfamiliar were the three most valuable skills I could teach my beginning-reader.

  10. Example Second Paragraph According to Jill Jakes of the Reading Institute, the most important process a student can initiate during reading is to visualize what is happening in the text (263). Note: the previous two paragraphs were entirely fictional and only intended to be an example of form for the first two paragraphs of the paper.

  11. A Word On Internet Sources • Remember, just because you got it on the internet, that doesn’t make it a web site. You may use ONE website unless you get special permission otherwise. • Remember, just because you got it on the internet, that doesn’t mean it’s a valid source.

  12. Example Questions • You are volunteering at Goodwill Industries. Many of the people who shop there appear poor. You ask the question, “Who is defined as poor in America?” Your secondary questions would be “How is the poverty level established in America?” and “What government services are available to people living beneath the poverty level?”

  13. Example Questions • You are helping raise money for Make A Wish Foundation. The child who will receive the money you raise has been diagnosed with leukemia. The questions that come to your mind for your research paper are: • What is Leukemia? • What are the treatments? What is the current prognosis for children with Leukemia?

  14. Other Topic Ideas • The value of community service • A biographical research paper on the founder of the organization • A paper on the history of the organization

  15. Due at end of the period • I will walk around the room and check off your brainstorming activity sheet. • At the door, drop a list of 3 potential questions with sub-questions. • You may use your phones to look up potential information.

  16. Brainstorming Activity • You should have gotten a colored sheet from the door. • At the top, like a title, write the name of your volunteer work. • Now, on the top third of the paper, you have eight minutes to write down as many topics which might possibly relate to your volunteer work. Write down at least 20 topics.

  17. Narrow • Now, go back and circle all the topics that might actually interest you. • Circle at least 5-6 topics that sound mildly interesting. • Get your phone out, or go back to the computer, and see if you can find at least 2 pieces of information on each topic. Start with the topic that sounds most interesting. • Put a box around those topics which have at least 2 sources.

  18. List your 3 major questions • Now, pick one of those topics, and form a major question, with at least 2 or 3 minor questions. • Ex • What is the history of Little League Baseball? • Who founded it? • Why was it founded? • How has it grown? • How does it affect communities.

  19. Now do that again, with the next topic. • Major question • Sub-question • Sub-question • Sub-question

  20. Now do that again, with the next topic. • Major question • Sub-question • Sub-question • Sub-question

  21. Due at end of the period • At the door, drop off your purple sheetwith 3 potential questions with sub-questions.. You will get it back tomorrow. • You may use your phones to look up potential information. • Major Question 1 • Sub-question • Sub-question • Sub-question • Major Question 2 • Sub-question • Sub-question • Sub-question • Major Question 3 • Sub-question • Sub-question • Sub-question

  22. Due End of Period at Computer Lab • A brief outline like the following example • Three good sources.

  23. Sample Outline • I. What is Leukemia? • A. What are the symptoms? • B. What are the treatments? C. What is the current prognosis for children with Leukemia?

  24. Your bibliography should look like this. It should NOT be a list of URLs!!! It should be typed, MLA, and have correctly formatted citations.

  25. Organization: • The information provided should answer the central question and never deviate from this purpose. The essay should be structured with answers to an outline of minor questions which evolved from the major question at issue. Each paragraph should contain a blending of the sources with clear opening and closing signals in MLA format. The writer created sufficient transition and commentary between his/her sources to have achieved unity in each paragraph and coherence paragraph to paragraph. For this reason clear opening and closing signals are vital. • 1 2 3 4 5

  26. Development: • Well selected, rich sources, each bringing fresh information or opinion are the root of the elaboration, exampling, and illustration that teach the reader. • The student writer quotes sources only 1) when the words themselves merit it, 2) when the writer is a noteworthy authority whose station merits quotation as an authority, or 3) when the words themselves are the subject of analysis. • Most of the work shared from other sources has been paraphrased by the paper's author with perhaps a phrase or two of quotation interspersed.   • 5 4 3 2 1

  27. Style: • The conventions of Modern Language Association style are observed throughout. Whenever someone's words or ideas are used, the name of the author can be found in a textual attribution. Parentheses contain names and pages or paragraph numbers or merely page or internet paragraph numbers following sources that have an attributive tag. However, there is always a clear opening and closing signal to take the reader to the works cited where complete and accurate bibliographical information can be found to locate the source. • Words are well chosen. Sentences are varied and clear. The writer makes the connection between his/her work in the introduction, but shifts to a more formal authorial voice after this personal, first person beginning. • 5 4 3 2 1

  28. Textual attributions Attributive Tag, also called an “opening signal.” • The noted psychologist Tim Banks states that all children over the age of five can give meaning to symbols (15). • Studies show children over age five can learn to read (Banks 15). • Banks also conceded that “excessive electronic entertainment inhibited learning outcomes” (265). Period comes after parenthetical note or “closing signal.”

  29. Grammar and Mechanics: • The writer has proofread the essay, checked the conventions of Modern Language Association manuscript style (all evenly double-spaced, correct headings, correct margins, 10 or 12 point type, and has used the Twenty Five Most Common Error strategy for eliminating errors, paying particular attention to verb tense, sentence boundary errors and agreement.  • 5 4 3 2 1

  30. We will take the time to look at this during class.

  31. Additional Information • You can find this PowerPoint, the essay rubrics, sample papers, and other helpful links and handouts on the Senior Project Page of Mrs. Mathews website: • http://teacherweb.com/CA/InderkumHighSchool/mmathews/photo2.aspx

  32. What’s due February 7th? • Activity Log with 30 hours. • Coral Evaluation papers.

  33. What’s due February 7thAlternative Assignment • A 100-entry annotated bibliography on your topic of social interest. Please make sure to clear your topic with me. • Outline for research paper with major question and minor questions to be answered. • Mrs. Mathews has information for completing your Annotated Bibliography at http://teacherweb.com/CA/InderkumHighSchool/mmathews/photo3.aspx

  34. What’s due February 7th? • Activity Log with 30 hours. • Outline for research paper with major question and minor questions to be answered. • Bibliography (all the sources you will be consulting) for paper. Typed, MLA. Remember those handouts you got in English class? Use them!!

  35. Senior Project Research and Reflection PaperDue March 1

  36. Senior Project Reflection Paper

  37. Remember these major guidelines for your paper: • The paper is a reflection of what you did for Senior Project. Think of it as your presentation (with a little of your research thrown in) on paper. • The paper should be minimum1000 words in length, typed in a standard 10 or 12 point font following MLA style. (1000 words will not impress the community board on May 2.)

  38. If you need more detailed help creating your reflection paper, read “Writing a Reflective Essay” in your Holt Literature and Language Arts textbook (pp 656-665).

  39. I’m giving you a modified version of this form today that explains the major characteristics of both papers for reference.

  40. Content of Reflection Form • Required Essay: Summarize your community service experience in essay form. Address each of the following in your essay. • Briefly describe your project and the main activities of your project. Describe changes you made from your original proposal. • Briefly outline the steps you took to plan, implement, and complete the project. Indicate how much time you spent in completing all aspects of this project. • Describe the problems that occurred during the project. Explain how these problems were handled. • Describe the effects you believe your project had on the community or on the people who received your service. • Describe what you learned about your community as you worked on your project. Describe what you learned about yourself and the importance of giving something back to others.

  41. Here is the rubric that will be used to grade your paper. Obviously, it’s too small to read. The following slides reflect the information on the rubric with extra detail given when necessary.

  42. Scoring Guidelines

  43. MLA Guidelines • The manuscript should follow MLA guidelines, be typed, double spaced and should have a heading on page one and headers on each subsequent page.

  44. Title • The title should narrow the scope of the paper and intrigue the reader. The title should not merely give a general label of purpose. It should hint at the lesson learned and make a promise it can keep. The introduction captures the reader’s attention.

  45. Title • Don’t underline it. • Ex: My Time At Ronald McDonald House • Don’t put it in quotations. • Ex “My Time at Ronald McDonald House” • The title should not merely give a general label of purpose. NOT Reflection Paper or Senior Project Reflection Paper But A Full Head, A Full Heart

  46. Explanation of Project • The writer gives adequate explanation of the project and its main activities, with descriptions of any necessary changes to the projects original proposal. The writer outlines steps taken to plan, implement and complete the project.

  47. Voice • Voice—the writer shares a unique perspective, so that the reader feels satisfied by the consistent unfolding of the process the writer has been through in creating the senior project. The writer is sincere and probing being careful to honestly describe any problems that occurred during the project and how they were handled. • Don’t over emphasize problems, but don’t act like savior either.