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  1. Usage Agreement Subject and Verb, Pronoun and Antecedent Verbs

  2. Exercise 4 p. 162 #1-10 Underline thesubject of each sentence then circle the verb in parenthesis that agrees with it. The confusion among the shoppers (is, are) understandable. • The traditional system of indicating quantities (makes, make) shopping a guessing game. • For example, the quantity printed on yogurt containers (tells, tell) the number of ounces in a container. • A shopper on the lookout for bargains (does not, do not) know whether liquid or solid measure is indicated. • Different brands of juice (shows, show) the same quantity in different ways. • One can with a label showing twenty four ounces (contains, contain) the same quantity as a can with a label showing one pint eight ounces. • Shoppers’ confusion, along with rising prices, (is, are) a matter of concern to consumer groups. • The metric system, in use in European countries, (solves, solve) most of the confusion. • The units in this system (has, have) a relationship to one another. • Consumer groups in this country (continues, continue) to advocate a uniform system of measurement.

  3. A. A word that refers to one person or thing – singular • A word that refers to more than one person or thing - plural

  4. B.A verb must agree with its subject in number. • Singular subjects take singular verbs ex. My friend likes algebra. The dog barks every morning. • Plural subjects take plural verbs. ex. My friends like algebra The dogs bark every morning • Nouns ending in “s” are plural (friends, dogs) • Verbs ending in “s” are singular (likes, barks.) • Except for third person singular – he, she or it helps exercise 2 p. 161

  5. C. The verb agrees in number with its subject, not the phrase following the subject. ex. The sign near the glass doors explains the exhibit. Anne, together with her cousins, is backpacking in the White Mountains. Robert, along with Jean and Tom, has been nominated for class president. (The subject is never part of the prepositional phrase.)

  6. D. Singular pronouns: each, either, neither, one, everyone, no one someone, anyone, everybody, nobody, somebody, anybody. (These can be tricky!) Each of the athletes runs effortlessly. Neither of the women is ready. Either of the events is worth watching Everyone in my family has enjoyed the games Someone in the audience was waving a flag. The subject always agrees with the verb – not the object of the preposition. Tip: Singular pronouns can be replaced with He. He runs effortlessly. He is ready. He was waving.

  7. E. Plural pronouns: several, few, both, many. ex. Few of the athletes have qualified. Several of the runners are exercising. Many on the team practice daily Were both of the games postponed? (Tip: Replace the pronoun with They.) They have qualified They are exercising

  8. F. Either singular or plural pronouns: some, all, most, any, none. Some of the show is funny. Some of the entertainers are funny. None of the music is catchy. None of the tunes are catchy. All of the cast looks young. All of the performers look young. Tip: The verb agrees with the noun next to it.

  9. Exercise 5 - Circle the correct verb. • 1.Each of the comedians (tries, try) to outdo the other. • 2. Somebody on the bus (was, were) whistling. • 3. All of the apples (is, are) spoiled. • 4. Neither of these books (has, have) and index. • 5. Everybody in my class (plan, plan) to attend the rally. • 6. Few of these jobs (sounds, sound) challenging. • 7. Several of those plants (grows, grow) well indoors. • 8. No one in the office (leaves, leave) early,. • 9. Both of her parents (has, have) offered us a ride. • 10. Most of those songs (is, are) from the sixties. • Review Exercises A and B p. 165

  10. The Compound SubjectG. Subjects joined by AND take a plural verb. ex. Leslie and Jill are going to the movies. Two people are 1+1 = 2 If a compound subject names only one thing, then the verb is singular. ex. My best friend and classmate is Tom. Chocolate chips and peanuts makes a tasty snack. (one combination makes)

  11. H. Single subjects joined by or / nor take a singular verb. • Either Anne or Tony will call you. (One person is.) 1x1=1 • Neither the coach nor the team is happy with the score. 1x1=1 (Neither one is happy.)

  12. Exercise 6 p. 167 – If the compound subject is joined by “and”, change it to “or” and correct the verb to the correct number. If the compound subject is joined by “or”, change it to “and” and correct the verb.EXAMPLE: Ann and Carl are providing the entertainment.Ann or Carl is providing the entertainment. 1. The dog or the cat has torn up the evening newspaper.2. My father ad his friend are rewiring our house.3. A mature woman or man is wanted for gardening chores.4. Jim and Elaine have promised to make the decorations for the party.5. A cartoon and an essay appear on the editorial page everyday.6. The Contender or The Good Earth has been assigned.7. Television and baseball take up most of my spare time.8. The car and the bus were to blame for the five-car pile-up on State Street.9. Nan and her mother wash the car every other Saturday.10. Leah or Jeff has promised to provide records and tapes for the dance.

  13. I.When a singular subject and a plural subject are joined by or / nor, the verb agrees with the subject nearer the verb. Ex. • Neither the losers nor the winner was happy with the outcome. • Neither the winner nor the losers werehappy with the outcome. Tip: These sentences are correct but sound awkward. Try revising: The winner was not happy with the outcome, and neither were the losers.

  14. Review Exercise D pg169 – Revising Sentences and Proofreading them for Subject-Verb Agreement. 1. Follow the directions in parenthesis next to each sentence. 2. Change the number of the verb to agree with the subject if necessary. • My aunt is planning to tour Nairobi National Park. (change aunt to aunts) • Flora and Estelle have already seen that movie. (Change and to or) • Nobody on the team plans to attend the opening ceremonies. (Change Nobody to Many) • My grandmother, as well as my mother, is working on the quilt. (Change grandmother to grandparents) • Most of the food for the party is in the cafeteria refrigerator. (Change food to salads) • Neither the librarian nor the aides have found the missing card. (Change Neither the librarian nor the aides to Neither the aides nor the librarian) • Cereal, toast, and milk are my usual breakfast. (Change Cereal, toast and milk to Ham and eggs.) • Some of my classmates take the bus to school. (Change Some to One) • The puppy playing with the children is only two months old. (Change puppy to puppies and children to child.) • Few of the reporters’ questions were answered in detail. (Change Few to Neither)

  15. J. Don’t and doesn’t must agree with their subjects. Use Don’t (do not) with you, I, and plural subjects Idon’t know. Theydon’t give up. Youdon’t say. Wedon’t want to. Use Doesn’t (does not) with singular subjects. He doesn’t know. One doesn’t give up. She doesn’t say. This doesn’t shrink. Jill doesn’t like pizza.

  16. Exercise 8 page 171 – Don’t or Doesn’t? • 1. She _______ influence me. • 2. This ____ taste sweet. • 3. He says he _____ want to play. • 4. These _____ impress me. • 5. It ____ look like snow. • 6. One of them _____ plan to go. • 7. They ___ want to help. • 8. Harold ___ know about the party. • 9. One of you ____ have the right answer. • 10. Dorothy and Elise ____ like the color of the new band uniforms.

  17. K.Collective nouns may be either singular or plural. committee, club, family, class, team, faculty Group as one unit – use singular verb The class has elected its officers. (class is one unit) Individual units – use plural verb The class have completed their projects. (individuals)

  18. L.A verb agrees with its subject, not with its predicate nominative. The marching bands are the main attraction tonight. (remember the verb always agrees with the subject) • When the subject follows the verb, as in sentences beginning with there and here and in questions, make sure the verb agrees with the subject. Here is a list of addresses. (list is) Here are two lists of addresses. (lists are) Tip: Watch out for contractions such as here’s (here is), there’s (there is), where’s, how’s, what’s, when’s. These use the singular IS and must have a singular subject.

  19. N. Words stating amount are usually singular. • Twenty dollars is too much for coffee. • Two hours has gone by. If the amount is meant as individual pieces or parts, use a plural verb. Fiveof the dollars were borrowed. Twoof the hours were spent in line.

  20. The title of a work of art, literature, or music, even when in plural form, takes a singular verb. Great Expectationsis one of my favorite novels. (one book) Hansel and Gretel, a popular fairy tale, was made into an opera in 1893. (one fairy tale)

  21. P. Every or many a before a subject - use singular verb. Every homeowner and storekeeper has joined the cleanup drive. Many a litterbug was surprised by the stiff fines. Q. A few nouns, although plural in form, take a singular verb. The news of your engagement was exciting. Names of certain diseases also end in s but are singular nouns: Rickets is a serious problem. Words ending in –ics are generally used with a singular verb. Athletics, mathematics, physics, civics, economics, politics, ethics. Politics is a controversial topic.

  22. Exercise 10. Write the subject of each sentence. Select the correctverb and write it after the subject. (reviews K-Q) • 1. The class (has, have) chosen titles for their original plays. • 2. First prize (was,were) two tickets to Hawaii. • 3. Three quarters of the movie (was, were) over when we arrived. • 4. Rattlesnakes (was, were) the topic of last week's meeting of the hiking club. • 5. Every student in the class (has,have) memorized a poem. • 6. War and Peace (is, are) a world-famous novel. • 7. Two thirds of the missing books (was,were) returned. • 8. Mathematics (is, are) an important part of many everyday activities. • 9. Where (is, are) the paragraphs you wrote? • 10. Four weeks (is,are) enough time to rehearse the play.

  23. Exercise 10 • 1. The class (has, have) chosen titles for their original plays. • 2. First prize (was,were) two tickets to Hawaii. • 3. Three quarters of the movie (was, were) over when we arrived. • 4. Rattlesnakes (was, were) the topic of last week's meeting of the hiking club. • 5. Every student in the class (has,have) memorized a poem. • 6. War and Peace (is, are) a world-famous novel. • 7. Two thirdsof the missing books (was,were) returned. • 8. Mathematics (is, are) an important part of many everyday activities. • 9. Where (is, are) the paragraphs you wrote? • 10. Four weeks (is,are) enough time to rehearse the play.

  24. Review exercise F • 1. Mumps (is, are) a common childhood disease. • 2. Taxes (is, are) always a main issue during an election year. • 3. Not one of the guides (knows, know) where the cloakroom is. • 4. The team (is, are) on a winning streak. • 5. Carol, as well as Irene, (writes, write) a column for the East High Record. • 6. “Beauty and the Beast” (is, are) a folk tale that exists in many different cultures. • 7. Ten pounds (is, are) far too much weight for a beginner to carry in a backpack. • 8. It is difficult to concentrate when there (is, are) radios and stereos blasting away. • 9. (Has, Have) either of you read To Kill a Mockingbird”? • 10. In most situation comedies, there (is, are) very wise characters, very foolish characters, and very lovable characters.

  25. Review exercise G 1. Civics (explores, explore) the rights and duties of citizens. 2. Some stories by Agatha Christie (features, feature) the character Miss Marple. 3. Each of the roses (was,were) a perfectly formed bud. 4. “Velvet Shoes” (is, are) my favorite poem. 5. There (was, were) crates all over the living room. 6. The captain or the coach usually (presents, present) the awards. 7. Nobody except my parents (believes, believe) that I”ll make the team. 8. Neither of us (is, are) going to the boat show at the civic center. 9. Why (doesn’, don’t) the coach call for time out? 10. A few of us (is, are) working on some new routines for the opening game.

  26. Agreement rules – quick reviewTest your memory – try to fill in the blanks with the correct word and correct the practice sentences for each rule. • When a word refers to _____person or thing, it is singular in number. When a word refers to more than one it is __________ in number. plural nouns usually end in ____ B.A verb must agree with its subject in number. ________ verbs usually end in “S” • The stone (makes, make) a terrible soup. C. The verb agrees in number with its subject, not the phrase following the subject. • The stone along with the vegetables (makes, make) a great soup!

  27. D. Singular pronouns: each, either, neither, one, everyone, no one someone, anyone, everybody, nobody, somebody, anybody. (These can be tricky!) • Each (is, are) enjoying the stone soup. • Everybody (likes, like) the vegetables the best. • Everyone (wonder, wonders) about the magic stone. • E. Plural pronouns: several, few, both, many. • Several (believe, believes) the stone added flavor to the v soup. • Many of the people (comment, comments) that the stone (taste, tastes) like chicken. • F. Either singular or plural pronouns: some, all, most, any, none. • Most of the people (eat, eats) voraciously. • Any person who (eat, eats) avoids the stone. • All (agree, agrees) that the soup (needs, need) salt.

  28. Review - continued G. Subjects joined by AND take a plural verb. • The Romeo and Juliet (go, goes) on a date to Gunstock. H. Single subjects joined by or / nor take a singular verb. • Neither Romeo nor Juliet (know, knows) how to ski or snowboard. • When a singular subject and a plural subject are joined by or / nor, the verb agrees with the subject nearer the verb. • Tybalt or their parents (find, finds) about their date. • Don’t and doesn’t must agree with their subjects. • Tybalt (doesn’t, don’t) know how to ski either. • Mr. and Mrs.Capulet (doesn’t, don’t) have money for a lift ticket.

  29. K. Collective nouns may be either singular or plural. • “My family (is, are) going to come after me,” said Juliet. • “My family (is, are) buying their tickets” said Romeo. • L. A verb agrees with its subject, not with its predicate nominative. • The ski instructors (is, are) the reason Romeo and Juliet escape. • M. When the subject follows the verb, as in sentences beginning with there and here and in questions, make sure the verb agrees with the subject. • There (is, are) secret trails down the mountain. • “Where (is, are) the fastest trail?” Romeo asked. • “Here (is,are) a pretty trail said Juliet. Where (do, does) this one go?

  30. Review continued N. Words stating amount are usually singular. “Ten dollars (is, are) too much for a ticket!” said Mr. Capulet. O. The title of a work of art, literature, or music, even when in plural form, takes a singular verb. Skiing for Dummies (is, are) a book I should have read,” thought Romeo. P. Every or many a before a subject - use singular verb. “Every trail (is, are) too steep,” thought Juliet. Q. A few nouns, although plural in form, take a singular verb. News of the date (is, are) in the newspaper.

  31. Agreement of Pronoun and Antecedent Antecedent – the word to which a pronoun refers or replaces. R. A pronoun agrees with its antecedent in number and gender. Colette performs her solo today. (feminine) James makes his debut tomorrow. (masculine) The show has the Old West as its theme. When the antecedent of a personal pronoun is gender neutral, look in a phrase following the antecedent for gender. Oneof the women in the acting class designs her own costumes. Each of the boysrode his bicycle to school.

  32. Sometimes the antecedent can be either masculine or feminine or both. Every one of the students shouted his or her approval. A person must always choose his or her friends carefully. (singular pronouns: each, either, neither, one, everyone, no one, anyone, someone, everybody, nobody, anybody, somebody) Someone left his hat on the field. One of the parakeets escaped from its cage.

  33. Two or more singular antecedents joined by OR/ NOR require a singular pronoun. Neither Richard nor Bob distinguished himself in the finals. Paula or Janet will present her view on the subject. Two or more antecedents joined by AND require a plural pronoun. Mona and Janet left early because they had to be home before ten o’clock.

  34. Exercise 11 page 179. Circle the antecedent and write the correct pronoun in the blank. • A person should always try _______ best. • The uniform company finally sent Bert and Ken the shirts that ________ had ordered. • Claire or Ida will go to the nursing home early so that _________ can help the residents into the lounge. • Several of the volunteers contributed ________ own money. • Each of the contestants answered ________ questions correctly. • Both of the girls packed ________ bags carefully. • Everyone wore a name tag on ________ jacket. • Neither of the women withdrew _________ application for law school. • Anyone can belong if ______ is interested. • Neither the coaches nor the players blamed _______ for the loss.

  35. Exercise 12 page 180 – Proofreading Sentences for Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement. If the sentence is correct write C. If there is an error in agreement, write the correct form of the pronoun so that it will agree with its antecedent. • George has chosen Walt Disney as the subject of his report. • Someone else in our class has also submitted their topic. • Dominic, one of the Perrone twins, has chosen Alfred Hitchcock as their subject. • Neither George nor Dominic will have difficulty finding material for their report. • Each of these moviemakers’ films has left their mark on the entertainment world. • Both Audrey and Sue offered their help with proofreading to George and Dominic. • Each boy refused politely, saying that they would proofread the report on their own. • Does everyone, including George and Dominic, know that they ust assemble facts, not opinions? • Neither George nor Dominic should forget to include anecdotes about their subject. • Nobody likes to discover that they just read a list of dull facts about an interesting subject.

  36. Chapter 5 Review: 1 If the verb does not agree with its subject, or a pronoun does not agree with its antecedent, make the necessary corrections. If a sentence is correct as it is written, just write “C” • Although the inn welcomed tourists, cars and buses was seldom seen parked there. • Every attempt Gary made to ford the streams were unsuccessful. • After graduation everybody in the group went their own way. • When the truck overturned a herd of cattle were set free on the expressway. • Few of the new styles appeal to me. • Either Joyce or Eugene have been chosen as freshman editor of the school paper. • Why don’t Karen want to join us at the dance? • Our club is a tighrly knit group, and every member has an equal voice. • A major concern among students are their grades • Two weeks were not enough time to prepare for our trip. • Not one of our tomato plants are producing any fruit, but the green beans seem to be thriving. • Neither of us cares for this show, but we have decided to stay until the end.

  37. 13. Everyone brought their own records to the party, but no one wanted to sort out the records at the end of the evening. 14. Chris and his brother, along with a friend, shoots baskets every afternoon. 15. Each of the six-week-old kittens was finally given away. • Neither of your stories sound believable, but the second one is at least interesting. • Most of the stew have been eaten by now. • Neither Harry nor I takes the bus to school. • Many of their experiments have failed, but Dr. Jenkins and his assistant never gives up hope. • Richard, along with many others, don’t always concentrate hard enough on math problems. • The football team was stumbling over one another on the field. • There is a brush, a comb, and a mirror on the dresser top. • “Birches” are a beautiful poem by Robert Frost. • Many a sailor have perished on this coast, crashing on its partly submerged rocks. • Measles have been almost completely conquered by a vaccine.

  38. Chapter 5 Review: 1 If the verb does not agree with its subject, or a pronoun does not agree with its antecedent, make the necessary corrections. If a sentence is correct as it is written, just write “C” • Although the inn welcomed tourists, cars and buses was seldom seen parked there. were • Every attempt Gary made to ford the streams were unsuccessful. was • After graduation everybody in the group went their own way. his or her • When the truck overturned a herd of cattle were set free on the expressway. was • Few of the new styles appeal to me. c • Either Joyce or Eugene have been chosen as freshman editor of the school paper. has • Why don’t Karen want to join us at the dance? doesn’t • Our club is a tightly knit group, and every member has an equal voice. c • A major concern among students are their grades. is • Two weeks were not enough time to prepare for our trip. was • Not one of our tomato plants are producing any fruit, but the green beans seem to be thriving. is • Neither of us cares for this show, but we have decided to stay until the end. c

  39. 13. Everyone brought their own records to the party, but no one wanted to sort out the records at the end of the evening. his or her 14. Chris and his brother, along with a friend, shoots baskets every afternoon. shoot 15. Each of the six-week-old kittens was finally given away. c • Neither of your stories sound believable, but the second one is at least interesting. sounds • Most of the stew have been eaten by now. has • Neither Harry nor I takes the bus to school. take • Many of their experiments have failed, but Dr. Jenkins and his assistant never gives up hope. give • Richard, along with many others, don’t always concentrate hard enough on math problems. doesn’t • The football team was stumbling over one another on the field. were • There is a brush, a comb, and a mirror on the dresser top. are • “Birches” are a beautiful poem by Robert Frost. is • Many a sailor have perished on this coast, crashing on its partly submerged rocks. has • Measles have been almost completely conquered by a vaccine. has

  40. Chapter 5 – review 2 – In the following sentences look for subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement. If there is an agreement error, correct it. If the sentence is correct write “C”. 1. Does the people you know collect things? 2. Nearly everyone in my family is a collector. 3. One of my cousins save old coins. 4. All the coins in her collection is carefully displayed in a special folder. 5. Another cousin, along with her two brothers, have a collection of baseball cards. 6. Some of the cards date back to the 1920’s. 7. Each of my cousins seem proud of these hobbies. 8. My brother Stanley, however, don’t collect anything. 9. His favorite pastime are watching birds and taking notes on his observations. 10. If someone accompanies Stanley during his observations, Stanley don’t say a word to them. 11. He is usually too busy watching one of the birds build their nest. 12. Not one of my relatives like to read as a hobby. 13. Neither cards nor coins appeals to me. 14. Instead I read articles that someone has written about things that interest me. 15. Many a friend have said that I collect facts as a hobby. 16. Each magazine article, along with every book, help me explore the world. 19. One of the most interesting of these birds is the kookaburra. 20. Neither my brother nor my sister have ever heard of the kookaburra. 21. The kookaburra don’t chirp, and it don’t sing. 22. Every one of these birds laugh! 23. They get together on a fence, and one of them are sure to start cackling. 24. Then another adds their voice to the chorus. 25. A person passing by will hear the voice, and soon they will burst our laughing too.

  41. Chap 5 – rev 2 –Look for subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement. If there is an agreement error, correct it. If the sentence is correct write “C”. 1. Does the people you know collect things? 2. Nearly everyone in my family is a collector. 3. One of my cousins save old coins. 4. All the coins in her collection is carefully displayed in a special folder. 5. Another cousin, along with her two brothers, have a collection of baseball cards. 6. Some of the cards date back to the 1920’s. 7. Each of my cousins seem proud of these hobbies. 8. My brother Stanley, however, don’t collect anything. 9. His favorite pastime are watching birds and taking notes on his observations. 10. If someone accompanies Stanley during his observations, Stanley don’t say a word to them. 11. He is usually too busy watching one of the birds build their nest. 12. Not one of my relatives like to read as a hobby. 13. Neither cards nor coins appeals to me. 14. Instead I read articles that someone has written about things that interest me. 15. Many a friend have said that I collect facts as a hobby. 16. Each magazine article, along with every book, help me explore the world. 17. For me the habits of the African elephant or the Australian kangaroo makes interesting reading. 18. Did you know, for example, that in Australia there is many fascinating birds? 19. One of the most interesting of these birds is the kookaburra. 20. Neither my brother nor my sister have ever heard of the kookaburra. 21. The kookaburra don’t chirp, and it don’t sing. 22. Every one of these birds laugh! 23. They get together on a fence, and one of them are sure to start cackling. 24. Then another adds their voice to the chorus. 25. A person passing by will hear the voice, and soon they will burst our laughing too.

  42. 1. Does the people you know collect things? 2. Nearly everyone in my family is a collector. 3. One of my cousins save old coins. 4. All the coins in her collection is carefully displayed in a special folder. 5. Another cousin, along with her two brothers, have a collection of baseball cards. 6. Some of the cards date back to the 1920’s. 7. Each of my cousins seem proud of these hobbies. 8. My brother Stanley, however, don’t collect anything. 9. His favorite pastime are watching birds and taking notes on his observations. 10. If someone accompanies Stanley during his observations, Stanley don’t say a word to them. 11. He is usually too busy watching one of the birds build their nest. 12. Not one of my relatives like to read as a hobby. 13. Neither cards nor coins appeals to me. 14. Instead I read articles that someone has written about things that interest me. 15. Many a friend have said that I collect facts as a hobby. 16. Each magazine article, along with every book, help me explore the world. 17. For me the habits of the African elephant or the Australian kangaroo makes interesting reading. 18. Did you know, for example, that in Australia there is many fascinating birds? 19. One of the most interesting of these birds is the kookaburra. 20. Neither my brother nor my sister have ever heard of the kookaburra. 21. The kookaburra don’t chirp, and it don’t sing. 22. Every one of these birds laugh! 23. They get together on a fence, and one of them are sure to start cackling. 24. Then another adds their voice to the chorus. 25. A person passing by will hear the voice, and soon they will burst our laughing too.

  43. Chapter 6 The Correct Use of VERBS

  44. The Principle Parts of VerbsA. The four principle parts of a verb :1) Infinitive – The base form ring, cook, use, risk, help, askThe bells ring everyday.2) Present *Participle– add –ing to the base verb ringing, cooking, using, risking, helping, askingThe bells are ringing now.3) Past – rang The bells rang at noon.4) Past Participle - rungThe bells have rung for the last time today.(Present and past participle verbs require helping verbs: am, is, are, has, have, had, etc.)

  45. Regular Verbs B. When an infinitive (base verb) is changed to past or past participle by adding –d or –ed it is aregular verb.

  46. Irregular Verbs C. When a base verb (infinitive) is changed to its past or past participle form in some other way than a regular verb it is an irregular verb. change the vowel change consonants add –en make no change at all

  47. Irregular Verbs Frequently Misused Look at the long list of irregular verbs on page 188 in your green book. Which verbs do you frequently misuse? begin, beginning, began, have begun drink, drinking, drank, have drunk shrink, shrinking, shrank, have shrunk swim, swimming, swam, have swum throw, throwing, threw, have thrown Exercise 3 page 189 (Worksheets, page 179)

  48. Exercise 4 pg.190 Exercise 4: circle the correct form of the verb. 1. A huge manta ray had (came, come) to the surface. 2. Maureen (did, done) her best to find a job. 3. Our water pipes have (froze, frozen) again. 4. The last bell had already (rang, rung). 5. The balloon (bursted, burst) with a loud pop. 6. Jesse Jackson (give, gave) the reporters a copy of the speech. 7. I have never (rode, ridden) on a roller coaster. 8. Have you ever (saw, seen) the gigantic trees in Redwood National forest? 9. Someone (drank, drunk) all the fruit juice. 10. The sound of the wind (began, begun to grow louder.

  49. Exercise 5 pg.190 Exercise 5: circle the correct form of the verb. 1. This morning I (swam, swum) ten laps. 2. We have never (drove, driven) out to the lake. 3. These jeans must have (shrunk, shrank) two sizes. 4. Have the roads (began, begun) to ice over? 5. Nina (brought, brung) her frisbee to the picnic. 6. Julia Fields have (gave, given) several readings of her poetry. 7. Has everyone (went, gone) to the park? 8. My shopping bag suddenly (bursted, burst) open. 9. Have you (wrote, written) to your cousin yet? 10. Yesterday I (drank, drunk) a glass of buttermilk.

  50. Review Exercise A Page 192– In your grammar notebook, write the correct form (past or past participle) of the verb given at the beginning of each sentence.Review Exercise C page 193 – proofreading sentences for correct verb forms.