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Bullying Prevention & Intervention – Module II PowerPoint Presentation
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Bullying Prevention & Intervention – Module II

Bullying Prevention & Intervention – Module II

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Bullying Prevention & Intervention – Module II

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  1. Bullying Prevention & Intervention – Module II Training for LPSS Faculty & Staff 2013-2014

  2. Module 2: Ensuring Safe & Supportive School Settings

  3. Objectives: • Review policies & laws regarding bullying and individual responsibility for reporting • Review definition of bullying and how bullying can impact a student’s mental health • Consider what a positive climate/culture looks like and how it can prevent bullying behavior • Correlate PBIS practices with Bullying Prevention • Examine the role of adult-to-student relationships in building a supportive classroom climate

  4. LA ACT 861- 2012 The purpose of Act 861 is to ensure that all school districts have and maintain a uniform policy to provide equal protection, for all Louisiana public school students, against bullying. This Act is known as the "TesaMiddlebrook Anti-Bullying Act.“

  5. Act 861 In Summary • “The principal/designee of each school in the LEA must establish and prominently publicize to students, staff, volunteers, and parents/legal guardians, how a report of bullying may be filed and how this report will be acted upon. The form developed by the LDE must be accepted as a report of bullying.” • “All school employees and parents chaperoning or supervising school-sponsored functions and events are required to report alleged violations of this policy to the principal or the principal’s designee. A verbal report must be reported on the same day as the employees or parents witnessed or otherwise learned of the incident and a written report must be filed no later than two days thereafter.” • To view detailed information on Act 861: • https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1t0_Z_CxfiyA0Atm4_9OEpODVMtxOEigxZLulkx3cBsg/edit?usp=sharing

  6. Colleague Letter Office ofCivil Rights - 2010 • “School districts may violate a student’s civil rights when peer harassment based on race, color, national origin, sex, or disability is sufficiently serious that it creates a hostile environment and such harassment is encouraged, tolerated, not adequately addressed, or ignored by school employees.School personnel who understand their legal obligations to address harassment under these laws are in the best position to prevent it from occurring and to respond appropriately when it does.” • The statutes that Office of Civil Rights enforces include: • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964(Title VI), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Title II) which prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability

  7. Bullying Defined Bullying is a form of youth violence that includes: • Unwanted, aggressive behavior • A real or perceived imbalance of power between the student(s) doing the bullying and the student(s) being bullied • Behavior that is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time -stopbullying.gov

  8. Possible Effects of BeingBullied • Have lower self-esteem • Greater loneliness • Greater anxiety • More depression • May harm themselves • Have high levels of suicidal thoughts • Attempt suicide • Want to avoid school • Have lower academic achievement -stopbullying.gov

  9. Prevent Bullying Behavior • In our last module, we learned: • how to identify bullying behavior • how to intervene • how to report it • Peer mediation, school-wide assemblies & Zero Tolerance policies do not PREVENT bullying • What are best-practice strategies for PREVENTING bullying behavior? Promoting a POSITIVE School Climate/Culture

  10. School Climate/Culture • Definition: • A group’s shared beliefs, customs and behavior which drive how people interact, solve problems and make decisions • Why is Climate/Culture Important? • Positive learning can only take place in a positive culture. A healthy school culture will affect more student and teacher success than any other reform or school improvement effort currently being employed. • -modelprograms.com

  11. Benefits of Positive Climate/Culture • Fosters effort and productivity • Improves collegial and collaborative activities • Supports successful change and improvement efforts • Builds commitment • Amplifies energy and motivates staff & students • Focuses attention and daily behavior on what is important and valued -modelprogram.com

  12. Benefits of Positive Climate/Culture Research shows that in a positive school climate, students: • Do better academically. • Attend school more regularly. • Feel better about themselves. • Engage in fewer risky behaviors like drinking alcohol or using drugs. • Engage less in bullying and other problem behaviors. -modelprogram.com

  13. Positive Climate/Cultureis Established Through: • Expectations • Relationships • Curricular focus • Extra-curricular activities • Decision-making processes -modelprogram.com

  14. Toxic School Climate/Culture: • Expectations are low • Teachers, families, students • Relationships are negative • Staff to staff, staff to students, students to students • Staff blame students for not being successful • Community blames the school for poor outcomes • Exhibit a sense of depression/frustration • Lack of shared sense of purpose – efforts are fragmented -modelprogram.com

  15. Bully Prevention in a Positive Behavior Support System

  16. What is PBIS? The intentional structuringof learning environments to equip students for behavioral success based on principles of human behavior. PBIS is NOT just bucks and a store. IT IS a School Climate change model! -modelprogram.com

  17. PBIS & Bully Prevention • PBIS Critical Element: School-Wide Expectations Identified and taught to students, faculty and staff (shared beliefs/values) • Create specific expectation lesson plans that include: respecting self/others, identifying disrespect, advocating for self & others, accepting feedback/criticism, asking for help • PBIS Critical Element: Consistently acknowledge and/or reinforce the use of expected behaviors with staff & students -modelprogram.com

  18. PBIS & Bully Prevention • PBIS Critical Element: Identify system for responding to and reporting incidents of inappropriate behavior • Adult Response to Bullying Behavior (Review) • Intervene immediately • Get adult help if needed • Separate the children involved • Make sure that everyone is safe • Meet any immediate mental or medical health needs • Stay calm. Reassure the children involved, including bystanders • Model respectful behavior when you intervene -modelprogram.com, Safe & Supportive Schools T.A. Center

  19. PBIS & Bully Prevention • PBIS Critical Element: Identify system for responding to and reporting incidents of inappropriate behavior • Reporting Bullying Behavior (Review) • All school employees and parents chaperoning or supervising school-sponsored functions and events are required to report alleged violations of this policy to the principal or the principal’s designee. A verbal report must be reported on the same day as the employees or parents witnessed or otherwise learned of the incident and a written report must be filed no later than two days thereafter.” LA Act 186, 2012

  20. Student Response to Bullying Behavior • Bully Prevention in PBIS – Elementary • https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5FfiOCxdE5WNjJwcjdOam1MSTQ/edit?usp=sharing • Bully Prevention in PBIS – Middle/High • https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5FfiOCxdE5Wa2ZCRzRZelZCWG8/edit?usp=sharing • Bullying & Harassment Prevention in PBIS: Expect Respect – Elementary/Middle • https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5FfiOCxdE5WM041MGxyaGpoLUk/edit?usp=sharing • Adopted for use in all LPSS Schools. All three are free curriculums that incorporate the previous PBIS critical elements just reviewed as well as a response system for students to use when they witness bullying. Lesson plans are included. A power-point presentation to train staff on this curriculum is also available.

  21. STOP/WALK/TALK • STOP: A common “stop” signal is decided upon by school staff and students are taught when to use it • WALK: Students are taught to “walk-away” after the signal is given rather than engage the studentfurther • TALK: Even when students use “stop” and they “walk away” from the problem, sometimes students will continue to behave inappropriately toward them. When that happens, students should "talk" to an adult. - Bully Prevention in PBIS

  22. Impact of Student Response In the majority of bullying episodes in which students intervene, the bullying stops within: A. Two minutes B. Ninety seconds C. One minute D. Ten seconds - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  23. In Conclusion: • Research clearly indicates that when students move from being bystanders to a bullying incident to standing up and intervening, they can have a powerful impact on stopping the behavior and sending a message that bullying is not acceptable. - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  24. The Importance of Relationships in Preventing Bullying Behavior

  25. Engagement is Characterized By: • The quality of relationships—including respect for diversity—between students and their peers, staff and their peers, students and staff, and staff and families • Bullying is a relationship problem that requires a relationship solution. • Positive relationships are a foundational element in creating a positive and supportive classroom climate - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  26. Positive School Culture 2008 study asked students to describe the things that teachers do that help them in their lives: • Be available. • Students point to teachers who are accessible to them, checking in on how they are doing and caring not only about their academic performance but also about all aspects of their lives. • Listen to me • Positive teacher-student relationships were characterized by teachers who actively listened to student concerns and worries, engaging them in dialogue about their lives. - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  27. Positive School Culture • Be positive. • Teachers who encouraged and modeled positive thinking in their students had students with higher levels of engagement and preparedness as well as higher levels of self-confidence that they could overcome barriers. • Have fun. • Students felt more at ease around teachers who were in control of the classroom but could keep students’ motivational level high by using humor. Along with being positive, humor can help build the kind of positive personal connections that play a part in building a supportive classroom climate. - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  28. Positive School Culture • Be real • Teachers who are comfortable being themselves around their students promote the kind of pro-social bonding that is an important element in a supportive classroom climate. Sharing personal information that is appropriate can help students see that their teacher is a real person and values them enough to share a part of his or her life with them. - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  29. MODEL RESPECT Respect is a learned behavior and attitude—we cannot make it happen, but we can teach and encourage it. • Set a tone of respect • Expose students to accurate information and positive representations of those who they may perceive as different from them • Talk about differences in a respectful way including examples of people with varied backgrounds and orientations • Provide time for learning and practicing positive, respectful behaviors - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  30. Students Model What They See! What YOU MODEL in your relationships with students and other adults also helps build positive student-to-student relationships that can have a direct impact on reducing bullying behavior through encouraging students to feel safe and confident to stand up for each other. - Safe & Supportive Schools T. A. Center

  31. Every Kid Needs A CHAMPION!

  32. Thank-You!! • Thanks for completing Module 2. Please return to www.lpssonline.com/bullyingto complete the 2 Hour Bullying Refresher Course Survey