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March 12, 2013 PowerPoint Presentation
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March 12, 2013

March 12, 2013

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March 12, 2013

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  1. March 12, 2013 (A Day) Agenda • DSJ #31 • Classifying Organisms (Part 1) • Binomial Nomenclature • DSR #31

  2. March 13, 2013 (B Day) Agenda • DSJ #31 • Classifying Organisms (Part 1) • Binomial Nomenclature • DSR #31

  3. DSJ #31 • Science Notebook – 4B • (If you still do not have a composition book, do this on a separate piece of paper) • Prompt: In 5 sentences or more, explain how a library is organized. Why is it organized this way?

  4. Classifying Organisms - Part 1 • Use the textbook to answer the questions. • Do only #1-10. • The answers can be found in the page numbers next to each bold heading. • Turn in to the teacher when finished.

  5. Classifying organismsPart 1

  6. Learning Objective Students will explain why biologists classify organisms.

  7. Why Do Scientists Classify? • Biologists group organisms based on similarities, just as grocers group milk with dairy products and tomatoes with produce.

  8. Why Do Scientists Classify? • Biologists group organisms based on similarities, just as grocers group milk with dairy products and tomatoes with produce. • 1. The process of grouping things based on their similarities is called classification.

  9. Why Do Scientists Classify? • 2. Biologists use classification to organize living things into groups so that the organisms are easier to study.

  10. Why Do Scientists Classify? • 3. The scientific study of how living things are classified is called taxonomy.

  11. Why Do Scientists Classify? • Taxonomy and evolution are closely related.

  12. Why Do Scientists Classify? • Taxonomy and evolution are closely related. • 4. Scientists infer that organisms in the same group descended from a common ancestor.

  13. Why Do Scientists Classify? • 5. In addition to classifying organisms, scientists try to figure out their evolutionary relationships.

  14. Levels of Classification • As you move down the levels of classification, the number of organisms decreases. The organisms at lower levels share more characteristics with each other.

  15. The Naming System of Linnaeus • In addition to grouping organisms, taxonomy involves naming them.

  16. The Naming System of Linnaeus • In addition to grouping organisms, taxonomy involves naming them. • In the 1750s, the Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus devised a system of naming organisms that is still used today.

  17. The Naming System of Linnaeus • 6. Linnaeus placed organisms in groups based on their observable features.

  18. The Naming System of Linnaeus • 6. Linnaeus placed organisms in groups based on their observable features. • 7. In Linnaeus's naming system, called binomial nomenclature, each organism is given a two-part name.

  19. The Naming System of Linnaeus Binomial Nomenclature: Felisdomesticus Common Name: House Cat

  20. The Naming System of Linnaeus • The first word in an organism’s scientific name is its genus.

  21. The Naming System of Linnaeus • The first word in an organism’s scientific name is its genus. • 8. A genus is a classification grouping that contains similar, closely related organisms.

  22. The Naming System of Linnaeus • The first word in an organism’s scientific name is its genus. • 8. A genus is a classification grouping that contains similar, closely related organisms. • The second word in a scientific name often describes a distinctive feature of an organism and labels the organism’s species.

  23. The Naming System of Linnaeus Species 9. Binomial Nomenclature: Felisconcolor Common Name: Mountain Lion Genus

  24. The Naming System of Linnaeus Binomial Nomenclature: Felismarmorata Common Name: Marbled Cat

  25. The Naming System of Linnaeus • 10. • Scientific names are always italicized. • The scientific names contain Latin words because that was the language that scientists used at the time that Linnaeus lived. • Only the first letter of the first word (genus) is capitalized. • Scientists prefer to use binomial nomenclature when talking about organisms because everyone uses the same name for the same organism. Binomial Nomenclature: Marmotamonax Common Names: Woodchuck, Groundhog, Whistlepig

  26. Binomial Nomenclature • Read the directions on the worksheet. • Use the key to help you figure out the scientific name that goes with the common name of the organism. • When finished, turn in to the teacher.

  27. DSR #31 • Science Notebook – 4B (Under DSJ #31) • (If you still do not have a composition book, do this on the same separate piece of paper you did your DSJ on. Then, turn it in to the teacher.) • Prompt: How is classification useful to biologists? Describe how binomial nomenclature is written. Why do scientists prefer to use binomial nomenclature?