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BASIC CREW INFORMATION PowerPoint Presentation
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BASIC CREW INFORMATION

BASIC CREW INFORMATION

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BASIC CREW INFORMATION

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  1. BASIC CREW INFORMATION

  2. Pre Departure Routine

  3. Pre Departure Routine On arrival to go out on the rescue vessel, certain items need to be checked: 1. Crew are properly dressed for outside work (no cotton) 2. Crew have appropriate survival gear on, e.g. PFDs, equipment vest, and floater jacket or cruiser suit. 3. Crew have helmet, goggles, toque or balaklava and boots as required

  4. 4. Crew have gear bag containing spare set of warm clothing, gloves goggles, glasses, flash light, knife, food, water, cell phone, phone number and identification, quarters and cash 5. All crew must leave their names ashore before departure in case of an emergency to the rescue vessel whilst afloat. Pre Departure Routine

  5. Pre Departure Routine On arrival at the boat, a pre-departure check should be started and completed.

  6. Pre Departure Routine In addition to the vessel check, before departing all of these tasks must be done: • Weather check • Crew briefing • Sail Plan filed with Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre • Start up procedure

  7. Sail Plan • File your trip with the nearest Canadian Coast Guard radio station. • Check in with your base when you depart and when you return.

  8. Vessel Safety

  9. Vessel Safety • What is wrong with this picture? • Name three things that are dangerous about this boat.

  10. Capacity Plate • Maximum weight • Maximum number of people • Maximum engine power

  11. 2 8 4 192 425 63 85 444 980 142 190 281 620 56 75 A 1 2 B 3 3 C

  12. Radio Communications Transmitter Button Priority Channel 16 Weather Channels Volume Squelch High/ Low Power

  13. Radio Communications Tips • Keep all transmissions brief • VHF 16 is for calling and distress only, do not yack on it. • Say the name of the vessel you are calling and then identify yourself • Listen to ensure the channel is clear before you speak

  14. Radio Communications Tips • Keep the microphone away from your mouth (1-6 inches) and speak normally. Do not yell! • Keep a log of all communications • Never use profane language (it is illegal)

  15. SAP 100

  16. SAP 100 is a process • Stop, (100feet away) or metres depending on the situation. • Assess, the whole team should try to observe and discuss what they see. Try not to plan yet. • Plan, every body gets input but the leader has the last word.

  17. Proper Assessment will save lives! • Fisheries enforcement • Police and ERT teams • Search and rescue • Fire fighting • Ambulance • Military SAP100 Can be used in any situation where a team is approaching an unknown and possibly dangerous scene.

  18. Rushing in isn’t the best option.

  19. SAP 100 Stop (100 feet away) Assess Plan There is always enough time

  20. Knots

  21. Knots – Clove Hitch • Used to tie a rope not too securely too a pole or ring.

  22. Round turn and 2.5 hitches • Used to a rope securely to a pole or ring • It is a clove hitch with two half hitches for added security

  23. Figure 8 Knot • This is a stopper knot . • When the rope is passed through an eye, and this knot made, the rope cannot inadvertently be pulled back through the eye

  24. Reef Knot

  25. Reef Knot

  26. Bowline

  27. Sheet Bend

  28. Mooring and Anchoring

  29. Mooring Lines

  30. Anchoring Stock • Anchoring is a process with steps that cannot be skipped. • If you wish to do right the first time, double check your gear • Remember to tie the anchor line to the boat! Shank Fluke Crown

  31. Drouges

  32. Parts of a Vessel

  33. Parts of a Vessel

  34. Navigation Marks & Buoyage

  35. Cardinal Buoyage System • Cardinal Buoys mark the safest direction to go. • You should steer North of a North cardinal marker

  36. Navigation Marks & Buoyage

  37. Weather

  38. Weather It is important that, as part of a Rescue boat crew, that you become aware of the marine weather forecast and the effects of adverse weather, so that you are personally prepared, and that you are aware developing weather that may exceed the limitations of your vessel.

  39. Sea State List the sea state beside the picture. A 1) Small Craft Warning 2) Storm force 3) Light Winds 4) Moderate Winds 5) Hurricane B C

  40. Distress Signals

  41. Distress Signals • All are listed in Annex IV of the collision regulations • Recognize the signs • Know what to do • Be familiar with your own signaling devices

  42. Chartwork

  43. Depths, Drying Heights & Elevations (A) Elevation -above HHW LT (B) Depth -below chart datum (C)Rock awash at chart datum (D)Rock which covers and uncovers with drying height. (E)Rock which does not cover with elevation. (A) Higher High Water-Large Tides Chart Datum- Zero Tide * (24) (5) + (B) (E) (C) (D)

  44. Speed, Distance & Time Cover the value that you need 60 xDistance Distance cover the D SXT 60 Speed Time Speed cover the S 60XD T 60D 60D 60D Time cover the T 60XD S S T S S T T

  45. Latitude Scale The Latitude Scale is always on the side of the Chart. All distances must be measure using the Latitude Scale See 48°50’N (48 degrees 50’ north)

  46. Longitude Scale The Longitude Scale is along the top and bottom of the chart. See 122° 50’ W (122 degrees 50’ west)

  47. Latitude & Longitude Position Positions at sea are generally given in Latitude and Longitude. Latitude is always given first, and Longitude second. Around British Columbia, all latitudes are north, and all longitudes are west

  48. Latitude Decimals & Seconds 48° 48.0’N 48° 48’ 00”N .9’ .8’ .7’ .6’ 54” 48” 42” 36” 60 Seconds = 1 Minute 60” = 1’ 60 Minutes = 1 Degree 60’ = 1° .5’ 30” .4’ .3’ .2’ .1’ 24” 18” 12” 06” 48° 47.0’N 48° 47’ 00”N Longitude works the same way

  49. Conversion of Seconds to Decimals & Back Seconds to decimals = Seconds 60 Decimals to seconds = Decimal x 60