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ACT Reading Preparation (for use in Social Science)

ACT Reading Preparation (for use in Social Science)

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ACT Reading Preparation (for use in Social Science)

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  1. ACT Reading Preparation(for use in Social Science) University of Illinois-Chicago Curriculum Framework Project Spring 2011

  2. FHS Social SciencesOverview of Unit • Introduction – ACT Reading Test • Lesson 1 – Active Reading • Lesson 2 – Question Types: MI & SD • Lesson 3 – Questions Types: Inference • Lesson 4 – Distracters: Weasel & Shift • Lesson 5 – Distracters: Enticer & Extreme • Strategies

  3. Introduction to the Test:Four Types of Passages The ACT Reading passages almost always appear in the following order: • Prose Fiction • Social Science • Humanities • Natural Science

  4. Our Focus - the Social Science Reading • Description • - 775 words • Questions based on passages from • any of the following subjects: • Anthropology, Archaeology, • Economics, History, • Political science, and Sociology.

  5. Introduction to the Test:Types of Questions • Main Idea Questions (MI) • Supporting Detail Questions (SD) • Inference/Evaluation Questions (I)

  6. Introduction to the Test:Main Idea Questions • Understanding theme/thesis • Understanding author’s purpose • Determine which of the answer choices best summarizes the information presented in the passage either as a whole or in a specific paragraph.

  7. Introduction to the Test:Main Idea Question Stems • Which of the following is the main point…? • The main argument the author makes about. . . is: • What is the main purpose of [a specific paragraph or line]?

  8. Introduction to the Test:Supporting Details Questions • Shows understanding of individual points • Demonstrate comprehension and careful understanding • Determine which fact(s) best supports main idea. • Sequence the events in the passage

  9. Introduction to the Test:Supporting Details Question Stems • According to the [a specific paragraph/section/passage]… • Who/when/what/where did… • According to the passage, all of the following are true about ------ EXCEPT. . . • The passage makes it clear that…

  10. Introduction to the Test:Inference-Evaluation Questions • Make judgments • Identify the implications of the supporting details in the passage. • Draw conclusions based on reading the passage • Determine the author’s idea through generalization of the facts

  11. Introduction to the Test:Inference-Evaluation Questions • Analyze cause-and-effect relationships • Identify multiple meanings of a word and determine its definition with context clues from the passage • Determine the implications of the author’s general tone or attitude

  12. Introduction to the Test:Inference-Evaluation Question Stems • The author suggests/implies/ that… • It can most reasonably be inferred that the author…. • With which of the following statements would the author agree? • According to the passage, the WORD/TERM ‘…’ means which of the following? • The idea….is best exemplified by which of the following quotations from the passage? • The attitude of the author toward x is…

  13. Lesson #1: Active Reading • Structural Clues • Annotating • Hinge Words

  14. Active Reading: Structural Clues • Each passage was written by a PERSON, and people write for a purpose. • Some authors want to trace historical causes or consequences. • Some authors want to critique a theory. • Some authors want to draw a comparison between two things. • Some authors want to tell a story. • Some authors just want to describe something.

  15. Active Reading: Structural Clues Why is it important to figure out WHY an author wrote a passage? Many questions ask you what the AUTHOR means, NOT what YOU think! Knowing what the AUTHOR would say can help you answer confusing questions!

  16. Active Reading: Structural Clues • Think of the passage as a map • Questions are like hints as to where to go next • The passage gives you the rest: Anticipate author’s direction by noticing structural clues (how passage is organized, where paragraphs break, what words are bold or italicized)

  17. Active Reading: Structural Clues • Look up the answers • Don’t remember them—find them! • Think of the passage as a reference book and refer back. • Don’t trust your memory!

  18. WRITE ON THE TEST as you read!! Use different marks to mean different things. Circle names of people Underline critical phrases, terms, main ideas Number (“1,” “2,” “3,” etc.) ideas in a sequence No matter what, underline “key words” in the question stem. Look for those “key words” in the passage. Active Reading: Annotate

  19. Active Reading: Example from Humanities (56A) Question Text from Passage “Undoubtedly, each of these notions does explain part of the soaps’ mass appeal. Soaps can ease the loneliness and boredom of life. They do offer advice, sometimes implicitly, often explicitly, on what to wear, how to conduct love affairs, how to save a marriage, how to handle one’s children, how to cope with heartache, how to enjoy the intrigue of romance.” (lines 19-25) “Loneliness, we are repeatedly told, has become pandemic in America…Whether through religion, clubs, associations, or support groups—or through daily immersion in a favorite soap—many Americans search for some kind of communal life to counter varying degrees of social isolation and alienation.” (lines 42-48) 21. The passage indicates that religion, support groups, and soap operas are alike in that they all: A. Are circulated by a common culture B. Provide a way to combat loneliness. C. Appear intimate but are remote. D. Enable people to participate vicariously.

  20. Active Reading: Example from Humanities (56A) Question Text from Passage “Undoubtedly, each of these notions does explain part of the soaps’ mass appeal. Soaps can ease the loneliness and boredom of life. They do offer advice, sometimes implicitly, often explicitly, on what to wear, how to conduct love affairs, how to save a marriage, how to handle one’s children, how to cope with heartache, how to enjoy the intrigue of romance.” (lines 19-25) “Loneliness, we are repeatedly told, has become pandemic in America…Whether through religion, clubs, associations, or support groups—or through daily immersion in a favorite soap—many Americans search for some kind of communal life to counter varying degrees of social isolation and alienation.” (lines 42-48) 21. The passage indicates that religion, support groups, and soap operas are alikein that they all: A. Are circulated by a common culture B. Provide a way to combat loneliness. C. Appear intimate but are remote. D. Enable people to participate vicariously.

  21. Active Reading: Example from Humanities (56A) Question Text from Passage “Undoubtedly, each of these notions does explain part of the soaps’ mass appeal. Soaps can ease the loneliness and boredom of life. They do offer advice, sometimes implicitly, often explicitly, on what to wear, how to conduct love affairs, how to save a marriage, how to handle one’s children, how to cope with heartache, how to enjoy the intrigue of romance.” (lines 19-25) “Loneliness, we are repeatedly told, has become pandemic in America…Whether through religion, clubs, associations, or support groups—or through daily immersion in a favorite soap—many Americans search for some kind of communal life to counter varying degrees of social isolation and alienation.” (lines 42-48) 21. The passage indicates that religion, support groups, and soap operas are alikein that they all: A. Are circulated by a common culture B. Provide a way to combat loneliness. C. Appear intimate but are remote. D. Enable people to participate vicariously.

  22. Active Reading: Example from Social Science (56A) Question Text from Passage “In 1910 the fight for women’s suffrage was more that sixty years old, a national campaign by the National American Woman Suffrage Assoc was twenty years old..” (Lines 3 - 6) “First women’s rights meeting at Seneca Falls in 1848.” (Line 38) “1895 Massachusetts conducted a referendum …whether suffrage should be extended to females.” (lines 56 – 60) “ The General Federation of Women’s Clubs did not endorse suffrage until 1914.” (lines 84 – 85) 17. Which of the following events was the first to occur, according to the passage? A. The National American Woman Suffrage Association began their campaign. B. The first women’s rights meeting was held in Seneca Falls. C. Massachusetts held a referendum on whether suffrage should be extended to females. D. The General Federation of Women’s Clubs endorsed women’s suffrage.

  23. Active Reading: Example from Social Science (56A) Question Text from Passage “In 1910 the fight for women’s suffrage was more that sixty years old, a national campaign by the National American Woman Suffrage Assoc was twenty years old..” (Lines 3 - 6) “First women’s rights meeting at Seneca Falls in 1848.” (Line 38) “1895 Massachusetts conducted a referendum …whether suffrage should be extended to females.” (lines 56 – 60) “ The General Federation of Women’s Clubs did not endorse suffrage until 1914.” (lines 84 – 85) 17. Which of the following events was the first to occur, according to the passage? A. The National American Woman Suffrage Association began their campaign. B. The first women’s rights meeting was held in Seneca Falls. C. Massachusetts held a referendum on whether suffrage should be extended to females. D. The General Federation of Women’s Clubs endorsed women’s suffrage.

  24. Active Reading: Example from Social Science (56A) Question Text from Passage “In 1910 the fight for women’s suffrage was more that sixty years old, a national campaign by the National American Woman Suffrage Assoc was twenty years old..” (Lines 3 - 6) “First women’s rights meeting at Seneca Falls in 1848.” (Line 38) “1895 Massachusetts conducted a referendum …whether suffrage should be extended to females.” (lines 56 – 60) “ The General Federation of Women’s Clubs did not endorse suffrage until 1914.” (lines 84 – 85) 17. Which of the following events was the first to occur, according to the passage? A. The National American Woman Suffrage Association began their campaign. B. The first women’s rights meeting was held in Seneca Falls. C. Massachusetts held a referendum on whether suffrage should be extended to females. D. The General Federation of Women’s Clubs endorsed women’s suffrage.

  25. Underline or circle hinge words Words or phrases that are used to alert you to shifts in thought Words or phrases that are used to drive a point home Answers are often located near hinge words! Common Hinge Words but, although, yet, however, as a result, nevertheless, on the other hand, despite, while, in spite of, consequently, therefore, thus, alternatively Active Reading: Hinge Words

  26. Active Reading: Example from Social Science (56A) Question Text from Passage “In 1910 the fight for women’s suffrage was more than sixty years old, a national campaign by the National American Woman Suffrage Association was twenty years old, and yet women could vote in only Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado.” (lines 3-7) 15. The passage presents the information that in 1910 “women could vote in only Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado” (lines 6-7) primarily to make the point that the: A. Women’s suffrage movement had made little progress up to that time. B. Women’s suffrage movement was just then beginning to get started. C. Women’s suffrage movement has made tremendous strides since then. D. Western states were the first to be receptive to the cause of women’s suffrage.

  27. Active Reading: Example from Social Science (56A) Question Text from Passage “In 1910 the fight for women’s suffrage was more than sixty years old, a national campaign by the National American Woman Suffrage Association was twenty years old, and yet women could vote in only Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado.” (lines 3-7) (this implies that there HAD been action, but the word “yet” tells you that the long period of action had not accomplished much!!!) 15. The passage presents the information that in 1910 “women could vote in only Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado” (lines 6-7) primarily to make the point that the: A. Women’s suffrage movement had made little progress up to that time. B. Women’s suffrage movement was just then beginning to get started. C. Women’s suffrage movement has made tremendous strides since then. D. Western states were the first to be receptive to the cause of women’s suffrage.

  28. Active Reading: Example from Social Science (56A) Question Text from Passage “In 1910 the fight for women’s suffrage was more than sixty years old, a national campaign by the National American Woman Suffrage Association was twenty years old, and yet women could vote in only Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado.” (lines 3-7) (this implies that there HAD been action, but the word “yet” tells you that the long period of action had not accomplished much!!!) 15. The passage presents the information that in 1910 “women could vote in only Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado” (lines 6-7) primarily to make the point that the: A. Women’s suffrage movement had made little progress up to that time. B. Women’s suffrage movement was just then beginning to get started. C. Women’s suffrage movement has made tremendous strides since then. D. Western states were the first to be receptive to the cause of women’s suffrage.

  29. Recap Lesson 1: Active Reading • Structural Clues • Annotating • Hinge Words

  30. Lesson #2 – Question Types: Main Ideas & Supporting Details • Review Information from Introductory Lecture • Examine Specific Questions from Practice Test 56A • Identify Strategies to Help Answer Difficult Questions • Practice the Strategies

  31. Practice Test Question 13:Main Ideas Question Text from Passage “Women’s suffrage challenged one of the fundamental assumptions of American politics: that the basic unit of political life was the family, with the father standing at its head representing and protecting his wife and children in the wider world. To grant suffrage to women would be to break up that fundamental unit.” (lines 12-18) 13. The passage indicates that at the time of the women’s suffrage movement, one of the fundamental assumptions of American politics was that the basic political unit was the: A. individual voter. B. precinct. C. village or town. D. family.

  32. Strategies to Help Answer This Question • Active Reading: Underline “key words” in the question stem. • Identify which key words in the question stem also appear in the text. • Look back at the passage! Do not try to REMEMBER the answer. • When looking at the answer choices, think about meanings, not exact words.

  33. Practice Test Question 13:Main Ideas Question Text from Passage “Women’s suffrage challenged one of the fundamental assumptions of American politics: that the basic unit of political life was the family, with the father standing at its head representing and protecting his wife and children in the wider world. To grant suffrage to women would be to break up that fundamental unit.” (lines 12-18) 13. The passage indicates that at the time of the women’s suffrage movement, one of the fundamental assumptions of American politics was that the basic political unit was the: A. Individual voter. B. Precinct C. Village or town D. Family

  34. Practice Test Question 11: Supporting Details Question Text from Passage ”Men gradually agreed to extend property rights to women, because property in a wife’s name could save a man from his creditors.” (lines 44-46) 11. The passage indicates that women’s demand for property rights was agreed to primarily because men realized that: A. Women were indeed individuals deserving of their own rights. B. If they gave in on the property rights issue, they’d be able to hold firm on suffrage. C. Conceding the right would provide men with a way to protect themselves from creditors. D. Women had unique interests and were needed as students in universities and teachers in schools.

  35. Strategies to Help Answer This Question • Active Reading: Underline “key words” in the question stem. • Identify which key words in the question stem also appear in the text. • Look back at the passage! Do not try to REMEMBER the answer. • When looking at the answer choices, think about meanings, not exact words.

  36. Practice Test Question 11: Supporting Details Question Text from Passage ”Men gradually agreed to extend property rights to women, because property in a wife’s name could save a man from his creditors.” (lines 44-46) 11. The passage indicates that women’s demand for property rights was agreed to primarily because men realized that: A. Women were indeed individuals deserving of their own rights. B. If they gave in on the property rights issue, they’d be able to hold firm on suffrage. C. Conceding the right would provide men with a way to protect themselves from creditors. D. Women had unique interests and were needed as students in universities and teachers in schools.

  37. Practice Test Question 12: Supporting Details Question Text from Passage “When Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the first women’s rights meeting at Seneca Falls in 1848, the many goals that were at first identified as worthy of support did not include the vote. Women wanted property rights, the right to divorce abusive husbands, the right to an education equal to any man’s, and the right to join any profession. But the idea of the vote seemed too extreme.” (lines 37-44) 12. At the women’s right meeting in Seneca Falls, all of the following were called for EXCEPT the right to: A. Vote in elections. B. Enter any profession. C. Divorce abusive husbands. D. Receive equal education.

  38. Strategies to Help Answer This Question • Active Reading: Identify Hinge Words • “BUT” • Active Reading: Underline Key Words in the Question Stem • “NOT” • Look back at the text!!

  39. Practice Test Question 12: Supporting Details Question Text from Passage “When Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the first women’s rights meeting at Seneca Falls in 1848, the many goals that were at first identified as worthy of support did not include the vote. Women wanted property rights, the right to divorce abusive husbands, the right to an education equal to any man’s, and the right to join any profession. But the idea of the vote seemed too extreme.” (lines 37-44) 12. At the women’s rights meeting in Seneca Falls, all of the following were called for EXCEPT the right to: A. Vote in elections. B. Enter any profession. C. Divorce abusive husbands. D. Receive equal education.

  40. Lesson #3 – Question Types: Inference • Review Information from Introductory Lecture • Examine Specific Questions from Practice Test 56A • Identify Strategies to Help Answer Difficult Questions • Practice the Strategies

  41. Practice Test Question 22: Inference—Meaning of Words Question Text from Passage “Here lies the extraordinary appeal and irony of the daytime soap opera; it is circulated by the very commercial culture which has engendered the need for it in the first place.” (lines 63-66) 22. As it is used in line 65, the word engendered most nearly means: F. Diminished G. Produced H. Denied J. Discouraged

  42. Strategies to Help Answer This Question • Look back at the text! • Reread the lines before AND after the word in the question stem. • Identify “hinge words” that help you understand the overall sentence. • Read the answer choices carefully.

  43. Practice Test Question 22: Inference—Meaning of Words Question Text from Passage “Here lies the extraordinary appeal and irony of the daytime soap opera; it is circulated by the very commercial culture which has engendered the need for it in the first place.” (lines 63-66) 22. As it is used in line 65, the word engendered most nearly means: F. Diminished G. Produced H. Denied J. Discouraged Choices F, H, and J are all the OPPOSITE of choice G. Each is too similar to be the right answer. Therefore, G is the logical choice!

  44. Practice Test Question 19: Inference—Meaning of Words Question Text from Passage “But women’s ideological advantage in the United States was offset by a crippling liability—the central importance of the family to maintaining social order.” (lines 23-26) 19. As it is used in line 24, the word liability most nearly means: A. Obligation B. Drawback C. Probability D. Result

  45. Strategies to Help Answer This Question • Look back at the passage! • Reread the lines before AND after the word in the question stem. • Look for “hinge words” that help you understand the overall sentence.

  46. Practice Test Question 19: Inference—Meaning of Words Question Text from Passage “But women’s ideological advantage in the United States was offset by a crippling liability—the central importance of the family to maintaining social order.” (lines 23-26) “crippling” has a negative connotation! (just like “drawback”) 19. As it is used in line 24, the word liabilitymost nearly means: A. Obligation B. Drawback C. Probability D. Result Hinge word!

  47. Practice Test Question 16: Inference— Drawing Conclusions Question Text from Passage “In the indifference, the inertia, the apathy of women, lies the greatest obstacle to the enfranchisement.” (lines 63 - 65) 16. It can reasonably be inferred that suffrage leader Susan B. Anthony’s statement (lines 63 – 65) is presented primarily to express the movement’s: F. questioning whether women had earned the right to vote. G. criticism of the generals in their army. H. frustration with women’s lack of interest in gaining suffrage. J. doubts about the attainability of women’s suffrage.