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Effects of Marine Debris: Ingestion By Birds PowerPoint Presentation
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Effects of Marine Debris: Ingestion By Birds

Effects of Marine Debris: Ingestion By Birds

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Effects of Marine Debris: Ingestion By Birds

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  1. Effects of Marine Debris: Ingestion By Birds

  2. Plastics do not biodegrade or mineralize (go away), but they do photo-degrade when exposed to sunlight, breaking down into smaller and smaller pieces that can be consumed by birds and other animals. Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  3. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  4. Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  5. Laysan Albatross on Midway Atoll • An estimated 479,526 breeding pairs in 2012 • An additional 500,000 estimated on island – non breeders • 75% of the world’s • Laysan Albatross • population inhabit the • Midway Atoll colonies Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  6. Black-footed Albatross on Midway Atoll • An estimated 27,498 breeding pairs in 2012 • 35% of world’s breeding population • The largest colony of Black-footed Albatross in the world Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  7. Short-tailed Albatross • Endangered – only about 1,200 remaining in the world • A breeding pair successfully bred and raised a chick on Eastern Island of Midway Atoll in the spring of 2012 • Two observed on Sand Island of Midway Atoll in 2012 Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  8. Albatross carcass filled with plastics Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  9. Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  10. Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  11. Albatross bolus, measuring about 4 inches long and full of plastic. Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  12. Albatross chick at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge Photo by: Chris Jordan Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  13. Volunteers collected more than 1000 plastic lighters on Midway Atoll in less than 3 months. Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  14. Can you tell which of these is a squid? Plastic lighters in the ocean can look a lot like the Albatross’s favorite prey. Photo by Pete Leary, USFWS Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  15. Cigarette lighters in the stomach of a dead Albatross Photo by: B. Mayer Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  16. Northern Fulmars • Forage exclusively at sea • Retain ingested plastics for a long period of time • Ideal indicators for marine debris (Photo: Ashok Khosla, www.seabirds.com) Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  17. Non-food stomach content found in a Northern Fulmar in a recent study. (Photo: Stephanie Avery-Gomm, UBC) Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  18. What can you do? • Dispose of plastic materials properly. • Participate in a marine debris clean up. • Reduce, reuse, recycle! Find out about recycling plastics in our area. • Be a wise consumer- pay attention to your use of disposable plastic products. • Show your support, financial and otherwise, for organizations and companies that address pollution issues • Educate your friends and family about plastic pollution. • Write your local, state, and federal elected officials about proper plastic disposal, enforcement of illegal ocean dumping, and the need to recycle. Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

  19. Information from: • Michelle Michaud • United States Fish and Wildlife Service. “Marine Debris: Cigarette Lighters and the Plastic Problem on Midway Atoll.” http://www.fws.gov/midway/Midway_Atoll_NWR_Cigarette_Lighters.pdf • Photos courtesy Michelle Michaud, unless otherwise noted.