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Adult Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support 2015

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Adult Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support 2015

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  1. Adult Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines forCardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care 1

  2. Pulseless Arrest

  3. 4 rhythmsproduce pulseless cardiac arrest: • Ventricular fibrillation (VF) • Rapid ventricular tachycardia (VT) • Pulseless electrical activity (PEA) • Asystole

  4. Survivalfrom these arrest rhythms requires both basic life support (BLS) and advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS).

  5. For victims of witnessed VF arrest, prompt bystander : 1. CPR 2. Early defibrillation can significantly increase the chance for survival to hospital discharge.

  6. In comparison, typical ACLS therapies, such as: • insertion of advanced airways and • pharmacologic support of the circulation, increase ROSC but have not been shown to increase rate of survival to hospital discharge.

  7. IV ACCESS FOR MEDICATION

  8. IV Access for Medications: • Central line accessis not needed in most resuscitation attempts. • Drugs typically require1 to2 minutesto reach the central circulation when given via a peripheral vein but require less time when given via central venous access.

  9. peripheral venous route: • Follow with a 20 ml bolus of IV fluid • Elevate the extremity for 10 to 20 seconds to facilitate drug delivery to the central circulation.

  10. Intraosseous (IO) cannulation provides access to a noncollaps-ible venous plexus, enabling drug delivery similar to that achieved by central venous access.

  11. If IV and IO access cannot be established, some resuscitationdrugs may be administered by the endotracheal route

  12. E T route: • Lidocaine • Epinephrine • Atropine • Naloxone • Vasopressin VALEN

  13. The optimal endotracheal dose of most drugs is unknown,but typically the dose given by the endotracheal route is 2 to2.5 times the recommended IV dose.

  14. Providers should dilutethe recommended dose in 5to10mLof water or normal saline

  15. Pulseless arrest and your reaction:

  16. Treatable Causes of Cardiac Arrest: The H's and T's 1. Hypoxia 2. Hypovolemia 3. Hydrogen Ion (Acidosis) 4. Hypo/ Hyper Kalemia 5. Hypothermia • Toxins • Tamponad(cardiac) • Tension Pneumothorax • Thrombosis (coronary) • Thrombosis (pulmonary)

  17. ASYSTOLE / PEA

  18. Asystole • complete cessation of myocardial electrical activity • End-stage rhythm • َAsystole should always be confirmed in at least two limb leads • It may be difficult to distinguish between extremely fine VF and asystole

  19. PulselessElectricalActivity • PEA is defined as non-coordinated groups of electrical activity of the heart (other than VT/VF) without a palpable pulse: EMD + pseudo EMD • EMD = Electro Mechanical Dissociation : no myocardial contractionsoccur • Pseudo-EMD : myocardial contractions occur but no pulse can be palpated

  20. EMD • Idioventricular rhythms • Ventricular escape rhythms • Postdefibrillation idioventricular rhythms • Brady-asystolicrhythms • Agonal rhythms

  21. Idioventricular rhythm Agonal rhythm

  22. Pseudo-EMD • Global myocardial dysfunction • Papillary muscle and myocardial wall rupture • Hypovolemia, tension pneumothorax, pericardial tamponade, and massive PE

  23. ASYSTOLE/PEA MANAGEMENT • Patients who have either asystole or PEA will not benefitfrom defibrillation attempts • A vasopressor (epinephrine ) maybe administered at this time. • Epinephrine can be administeredapproximately every 3 to 5 minutes during cardiac arrest

  24. Asystole & PEA

  25. When supplementary oxygen is available, it may be reasonable to use the maximal feasible inspired oxygen concentration during CPR

  26. In intubated patients, failure to achieve an ETCO2 • of greater than 10 mm Hg by waveform capnography after 20 minutes of CPR may be considered as one component of a multimodal approach to decide when to end resuscitative efforts, but it should not be used in isolation

  27. if the arterial relaxation “diastolic” pressure is <20 mm Hg, it is reasonable to consider trying to improve quality of CPR by optimizing chest compression parameters or giving a vasopressor or both

  28. What is this?

  29. Polymorphic VT ( TdP)

  30. VT / VF

  31. NOTICE • Emphasis on effective chest compression • One universal compression-to-ventilation 30/2 • Recommendation for 1-second breaths during all CPR

  32. Rescuers should change compressors every 2 min • Compression should ideally be interrupted only for rhythm check and shock delivery

  33. Providers do not attempt a pulse or check the rhythmafter shock delivery • Drug should be delivered during CPR, as soon as possible after rhythm check