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Experience Miner Training

Experience Miner Training

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Experience Miner Training

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  1. Experience Miner Training Surface

  2. Coal Processing Operation • Raw Coal Storage. • Silos and Draw-off tunnels. • Transported by belt to top of plant. • Channeled through plant during the cleaning process by plant operator. • Clean coal transported out to clean coal silo that has feeders. • Refuse goes to bin to be hauled away by trucks. • Train Load-out facility at bottom of hill by tracks.

  3. Responsibilities Of:

  4. Mandatory Health and Safety Standards • Front End Loader – “Show Tape” and discussions. • Dozers – Stock Pile Safety Tapes and Discussions. • Refuse Truck – Show Pre-operational checks and discussions. • Chemicals • Weather • People

  5. Topic of Discussion • Mine Escape System. • Equipment • Scalping Tower • Prep Plant Buildings • Escape and Emergency Evacuation Plan • Exits • Fire Extinguishers • Fire Hose • Firewarning signals and Fire Fighting Procedures. • Call Security • 911 system

  6. Transportation Controls • Operation of Equipment – • Speed of Equipment; • Weather Conditions; • Road Conditions. • Controls for Transportation – • Traffic Signs • Communication Systems, Warning Signals and Directional Signs – • Belt Start Up; • Audible and Back Up Horns on Equipment; • Mirrors; • Traffic Flow; • Other Equipment.

  7. Escapeways, Emergency Evacuation, Firewarning, and Firefighting What to do?

  8. INTRODUCTION • Reaction to a fire must occur in the early stages of an emergency. • Effective firefighting depends on your work habits • Judgment • Ability to react appropriately.

  9. FIRE PREVENTION • Best prevention method – do not have one. • Know the location of fire fighting equipment. • Know how to use the fire fighting equipment. • Obey “NO SMOKING” signs.

  10. FIRE PREVENTION • Containers must be clearly marked and NO SMOKING signs posted for stored. • Diesel Fuel • Gasoline • Other flammable liquids

  11. FIRE PREVENTION • FUELING AREAS: • Internal combustion engines shut off. • Does not include diesels. • No smoking, open lights.

  12. FIRE PREVENTION • Use noncombustible safety containers for flammable liquids. • Discard damaged or leaking containers • Keep storage areas free of debris, such as burnable trash, oily rags, and matches. • Don’t store combustibles near welding and cutting equipment. • Don’t discard batteries that could produce heat

  13. Never smoke or carry open flames into or around storage areas. • Be sure warning signs are maintained and visible. • Always obey warning signs.

  14. FIRE FIGHTING EQUIPMENT • MSHA’s Law: • Preparation plants, tipples, drawoff tunnels and other surface installations must be equipped with portable fire extinguishers sufficient to meet any fire hazard that could exist in these structures.

  15. FIRE FIGHTING EQUIPMENT • Preparation plants equipped with waterlines, with outlet valves on each floor, and with sufficient fire hose to project a water stream to any point in the plant. • Exception – Freezing conditions exist or water is not available. • 2,500 square feet of floor space will need 125 pounds of dry powder extinguisher.

  16. FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT • Fire extinguishers provided at; • Mobile equipment • Portable welding units • Auxiliary equipment when operated more than 600 feet that has fire extinguishers • Permanent electrical installations • Combustible liquid storage installations. • Equip carrying flammable liquid – additional.

  17. Several motors or transformers can be served by a single fire extinguisher that can not be placed further than 50 feet away from any unit. • Where welding, cutting or soldering is performed. • Permanent substations require 2 – 20 lb.

  18. IMPORTANT RULES • Check your work area and know where fire extinguishers are kept. • Always have a used extinguisher replaced. • Have damaged extinguisher replaced. • Be sure fire extinguishers are checked and dated at least every 6 months.

  19. WHEN FIRE STARTS • THE ACTION YOU TAKE IN FIRST FEW MINUTES COULD BE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A MINOR AND MAJOR DAMAGE, AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH.

  20. INITIAL ACTION • FIRST determine what is burning if possible. • Try to extinguish it • Warn others in the immediate area. • Get clear of any area that poses an immediate threat – getting trapped. • Contact your supervisor for help. • Sound an alarm if available. • If safe, return and keep trying to put out.

  21. TYPES OF FIRES • Four categories: • Class A – wood, coal fires, burning paper and cloth. • Think Class A as those that leave Ashes • Water or Dry Chemical used to put out fire.

  22. TYPES OF FIRES • Class B – Burning flammable liquids, gasoline, fuel oils. • Think Class B as those involving contents that will Boil. • Dry chemical, foam, vaporized liquids (CO2), and water fog used to put out this type of fire.

  23. TYPES OF FIRES • Class C – Electrical fires, electrical motors, battery equipment, transformers, circuit breakers, and cables. • Think Class C fires as Current fires. • Dry chemical and vaporized liquids(CO2) used to put put out this type of fire.

  24. TYPES OF FIRES • Class D – burning metals, magnesium, and sodium. • Special extinguishers developed for use. • Should not use normal ABC extinguishers, they make matters worse.

  25. FIRE EXTINGUISHER RATING • Rated for use – A-B-C-D. • For example a 2A 10BC rated fire extinguisher • Letter represents the type of fire it will put out. • Number will represent size of fire it will put out.

  26. FIRE FIGHTING TECHNIQUE • Approach no closer than 6 feet from the fire. • Grasp the extinguisher firmly and activate. • Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire and squeeze the handle. • Use a side-to-side sweeping motion to blanket the fire. • BE AWARE of exploding material. • Watch fire after brought under control.

  27. Mine Escape System • Know your exits! • Plant • Draw Off Tunnels • Other Buildings • Plan In Effect. • Where to Gather. • Parking Lot • Head Count of People.

  28. Ground Control • Working safely in areas of water hazards; • Illumination of work areas; • Safe work procedures for miners during hours of darkness;

  29. Hazard Recognition • Recognition of hazards; • Avoidance of hazards;

  30. What is an Accident? • Unplanned event. • Personal injury or property damage must result or both. • WILL BE: • Direct Causes – unwanted release of energy. • Indirect Causes – Contributing factors. • Basic Causes – Management, Safety Policies not in place or not being followed and personal factors.

  31. How Many Surface Fatalities for 2006? • Nine Fatalities out of the 47 deaths • This represents 19%.

  32. FIRST AID AND RESCUE SUPPLIES • KNOW the location of first aid and EMT kits. • Tool Room • Main Portal • If someone is injured – act quickly. • Notify your supervisor and Plant Control. • Call 911 and Security at Mine

  33. Surface First Aid Supplies MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS OF PART 77 • SUPPLIES TO BE KEPT WHERE 10 OR MORE PERSONS WORK • 1 STRETCHER / BROKEN BACK BOARD • 24 TRIANGULAR BANDAGES • 8 ea. 4” BANDAGE COMPRESSES • 8 ea. 2” BANDAGE COMPRESSES • 12 ea. 1” ADHESIVE COMPRESSES • BURN REMEDY • 2 CLOTH BLANKETS • 1 RUBBER BLANKET OR SUBSTITUTE • 2 TOURNIQUETS • SPIRITS OF AMMONIA • SPLINTING MATERIAL

  34. Emergency Medical Procedures • EMERGENCY E-SQUADS • Beallsville • Smith Township • Barnesville • Powhatan • LIFE FLIGHT: • Allegheny General • Call security in the event of an injury.

  35. FOREIGN BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT Obstructed Airways - Causes & Precautions Recognizing FBAO Poor Air Exchange No Air Exchange The Sub diaphragmatic Abdominal Thrust (Heimlich Maneuver) Conscious Victim Unconscious Victim

  36. Pressure Points Direct Pressure DirectPressure with Elevation Using an Air Splint

  37. BRUISE (CONTUSION)

  38. REST ICE COMPRESSION ELEVATION

  39. Neck & Spinal Injuries • CARE AND TREATMENT • ABC’s • Use extreme care in initial examination — minimal movement • apply cervical collar • treat for shock • treat any other injuries • maintain body heat • if movement required, 'log roll' and use assistants • always maintain casualty's head in line with the shoulders • urgent transport

  40. HEAD INJURIES SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS • HEADACHE • PHYSICAL SIGNS • LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS • CONFUSION • UNEQUAL / UNRESPONSIVE PUPILS • PARALYSIS • LOSS OF SENSATION • IMPARED VISION • NAUSEA • CHANGING RESPIRATION PATTERNS • SIEZURES

  41. CARE OF HEAD INJURIES • STABILIZE HEAD • MAINTAIN AIRWAY • KEEP PATIENT STILL • CONTROL BLEEDING • DRESS OPEN WOUNDS • CARE FOR SHOCK • PROVIDE OXYGEN • MONITOR VITALS • MONITOR LEVEL OF CONSCIOUSNESS • BE PREPARED FOR VOMITING

  42. SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF BONE OR JOINT INJURIES BRUISING PAIN SWELLING DEFORMITY TENDERNESS GRATING EXPOSED BONE ENDS JOINT LOCKED IN POSITION

  43. Must be a straight line break Can be formed to shape of deformity Splints Be careful of temperature change

  44. CONTROL ANY BLEEDING APPLY A STERILE DRESSING CUT AWAY CLOTHING TO EXPOSE THE INJURY STABILIZE THE LIMB AND ASSESS

  45. BANDAGE THE WOUND SECURE THE LIMB TO THE SPLINT PAD THE SPLINT

  46. APPLYING AN AIRSPLINT INFLATE THE SPLINT BY MOUTH ONLY PLACE THE SPLINT ON THE LIMB CHECK TO MAKE SURE SPLINT IS NOT OVER-INFLATED

  47. DRESSING - covers the wound. BANDAGE - Holds a dressing in place.

  48. Lifting Techniques Two person carry 4 person straddle