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  1. Research Skills LO: How can I gather research quickly and effectively? Starter: What methods of research do you know?

  2. Definitions of Sources Can you match the word with its definition? A Contents PageA list of difficult words with their meanings explained Index Pages A classification system used in libraries Search Engine A person with great knowledge in something Expert A list of chapters in the front of a book Dewey System An alphabetical list of key words in the back of a book Glossary A device used to find information on the internet

  3. Check Your Understanding A Contents PageA list of difficult words with their meanings explained Index Pages A classification system used in libraries Search Engine A person with great knowledge in something Expert A list of chapters in the front of a book Dewey System An alphabetical list of key words in the back of a book Glossary A device used to find information on the internet

  4. Skim, Scan and Highlight Reading the whole of a chapter or an entire web site for information is not a good way of using your time. You canSKIMthrough instead. Skimming is where you read quickly without taking in all the details. Even quicker isSCANNING. Scanning involves glancing over the pages very quickly for key words associated with the topic. You could HIGHLIGHT keywords and phrases. Highlighting helps you to recollect where important information is on the page.

  5. Highlighting Task: Highlight in one colour information about Shakespeare’s personal life and in the other colour information about his professional life.

  6. William Shakespeare was born in Stratford on about April 23rd 1564. His father William was a successful local businessman and his mother Mary was the daughter of a landowner. Relatively prosperous it is likely the family paid for William’s education, although there is no evidence he attended university. In 1582 William, aged only 18, married an older woman (26) named Anne Hathaway. Soon after they had there first daughter, Susanna. They had another 2 children but William’s only son Hamnet died aged only 11. After his marriage information about the life of Shakespeare is sketchy but it seems he spent most of his time in London writing and performing in his plays. Only returning home during Lent when all theatres were closed. It is generally thought that during the 1590s he wrote the majority of his sonnets. This was a time of prolific writing and his plays developed a good deal of interest and controversy. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet and Two Gentlemen of Verona were written between 1589 and 1595.

  7. Plenary Feedback to a partner or the rest of the group. Discuss what you have highlighted and how you decided whether the information was about his personal or private life.

  8. Research Skills LO: Can I write linear and diagrammatic notes from written texts? Starter: What techniques do I use to revise or make notes?

  9. The Next Step Once you have selected a source, found the information you want and highlighted the relevant points it’s time to take the next step…

  10. Notemaking Brilliant, I’ve found what I was looking for, now I’ll just cut and paste or copy it… No! You need to make it your own work, copying is plagiarism which is illegal! You need to learn about notemaking.

  11. What Are Notes? Notes are a brief, informal and fast way of recording information about a subject. They may look something like this: Shakespeare – 1564 – 1616 - born Stratford, Eng. Dad John, mum Mary one of 8 kids. jobs = actor, poet, playwright. 1st play (1589 – 95) Romeo & Juliet, midsummer nights dream, 2 gent of V . Wed Anne Hathaway in 1582 .3 kids but moved to London. Died 52. What do you notice about these notes? How are the ‘rules’ of note-taking different from Standard English? Why do you think this is?

  12. Note Making Methods Copying everything out can take a long time and may mean you copy things down that you don’t really need or understand. Notesrequire you to select relevant information. This allows your brain to process the facts which means that you will be much more likely to understand what you are writing about. Task: You are going to make some notes about William Shakespeare. Remember the short Shakespeare biography…

  13. William Shakespeare was born in Stratford on about April 23rd 1564. His father William was a successful local businessman and his mother Mary was the daughter of a landowner. Relatively prosperous it is likely the family paid for William’s education, although there is no evidence he attended university. In 1582 William, aged only 18, married an older woman (26) named Anne Hathaway. Soon after they had there first daughter, Susanna. They had another 2 children but William’s only son Hamnet died aged only 11. After his marriage information about the life of Shakespeare is sketchy but it seems he spent most of his time in London writing and performing in his plays. Only returning home during Lent when all theatres were closed. It is generally thought that during the 1590s he wrote the majority of his sonnets. This was a time of prolific writing and his plays developed a good deal of interest and controversy. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet and Two Gentlemen of Verona were written between 1589 and 1595.

  14. Different types of Notes Now you have highlighted the relevant information you need to jot down a few notes. There are two main types: linear notes and diagrammatic notes. Let’s look at both types then you can decide which is best for you…

  15. Linear notes A straight forward way of writing down the information you need is to use linear notes. I need to write notes about Shakespeare’s personal life. You could write down the information in bulletpoints. Bullet points are lists of key points, emphasized by a ‘bullet’. e.g.William Shakespeare: • Born 1564 • Birthplace: Stratford, England • Family: Son of John and Mary Shakespeare

  16. Structuring linear notes Linear notes are chronological and need to be organised into categories to make them clear and useful. For example: William Shakespeare: Personal Life Professional Life • Joined a company of travelling actors or ‘players’ (1585-90) • Moved to London to be part of the theatre scene (1590) • Wrote ‘Two Gentlemen of Verona’ (1592) • Born 1564 • Birthplace: Stratford, England • Family: Son of John and Mary Shakespeare

  17. Diagrammatic notes You may prefer to make your notes into spider diagrams, to create visual pictures help to retain information, e.g. Wrote Romeo & Juliet in 1590s Marriage to Anne Hathaway Had 3 children Personal Professional Son dies agedeleven Theatres closed down due to plague

  18. Make Notes Task! Use either the linear or diagrammatic format to make notes about Shakespeare’s personal and private life.

  19. William Shakespeare was born in Stratford on about April 23rd 1564. His father William was a successful local businessman and his mother Mary was the daughter of a landowner. Relatively prosperous it is likely the family paid for William’s education, although there is no evidence he attended university. In 1582 William, aged only 18, married an older woman (26) named Anne Hathaway. Soon after they had there first daughter, Susanna. They had another 2 children but William’s only son Hamnet died aged only 11. After his marriage information about the life of Shakespeare is sketchy but it seems he spent most of his time in London writing and performing in his plays. Only returning home during Lent when all theatres were closed. It is generally thought that during the 1590s he wrote the majority of his sonnets. This was a time of prolific writing and his plays developed a good deal of interest and controversy. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet and Two Gentlemen of Verona were written between 1589 and 1595.

  20. Plenary Feedback to the rest of the group. Discuss what you have written, which style of notes you decided to use and why. You could create a note-making poster to display in the classroom.

  21. Writing Up Notes Notes are brilliant for getting down relevant information quickly. However most tasks require you to write up your notes and produce a final piece of work. Below are some notes about the author Charles Dickens. Charles Dickens – 1812 – 1870 - born P’mouth, Eng. Dad in prison for debt- C.D went to work @ 12 in factory. 1st job = attorney’s clerk. 1st success (1837) PW Papers. Wed Cath Hogarth in 1835 10 kids but separated in 1858. Died 58, Gads Hill, Kent. What would you need to do to change these notes into a final piece of writing?

  22. Transformation Tools To make your notes into a final paragraph you will need to almost completely transform your text. How will you do it? use Standard English write in full sentences Change numbers into words Transforming Notes spell correctly Change abbreviations into complete words / phrases punctuate How many did you get?

  23. Notes into Prose Example Charles Dickens – 1812 – 1870 - born P’mouth, Eng. Dad in prison for debt- C.D went to work @ 12 in factory. 1st job = attorney’s clerk. 1st success (1837) PW Papers. Wed Cath Hogarth in 1835 10 kids but separated in 1858. Died 58, Gads Hill, Kent. Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, on February 7, 1812. His father, John Dickens, worked as a clerk in the Navy Payroll Office but was constantly in debt, and in 1824 he was incarcerated in a debtor's prison.

  24. Notes into Prose Remember the transformation tools from the previous slide? Using all your notes write a paragraph about William Shakespeare. When you have finished read your work out to the class.

  25. Introduction to ShakespeareLO: Can I produce a collage to present new information I have learnt about Shakespeare?Starter:What methods do you have for memorising? Share them with your table group as you will need them next…

  26. Starter: Memory Game

  27. Investigating Shakespeare • You will be handed an interesting fact about Shakespeare on a piece of paper. • Your mission is to gather and memorise as many facts as possible from other students around the room. • Rules you have to be standing and cannot be seated in your chair. • You must not write down any of the facts you learn. • You have 5 minutes to learn as much as possible before handing your facts back in.

  28. WARNING COLLABORATIVE HOUSEPOINTS ON OFFER!

  29. Show what you have learned • Now in your groups on the paper provided, present a collage of what you have learned (use one of the note taking skills we have practised if you wish) • Your work will be assessed by another group who will total up the number of facts you have. • Your work will also be judged on how creatively you present your information.

  30. A Day in the Life of Shakespeare • WAF 1, 2, 4 • Write a diary entry as Shakespeare. • You can pick any stage of his life: • Dropping out of school at 14 because your family can’t afford it. - Meeting your future wife Anne Hathaway. - The death of your son due to the plague. Etc. • Diary features: • 1st person, • informal • describing thoughts and emotions, • Link paragraphs.

  31. Your success criteria • 20 minutes • Check/ re write/ edit your work using your success criteria • Hand in your success criteria with your assessment WAF 1, 2, 4

  32. Homework • Due Thursday 31st • English: Plan for written assessment writing diary entry as Shakespeare. PLEASE NOTE: Pay attention to assessment foci. Plan must not include full sentences.

  33. Today’s lesson- Leaflets

  34. William Shakespeare Here is where you would put in some textual information about Shakespeare’s life. Most leaflet pages are a mixture or balance of text and images. The more information = the better More text can go here as well. Try to avoid leaving blank spaces.

  35. To be successful your leaflet will • include accurate and interesting information under a variety of headings. RAF3, WAF1 • be colourful and attractive to the eye. WAF2 • be well organized and planned out showing sequencing and paragraph links WAF4

  36. Plenary • Throw the ball: if you get the ball, name one new fact that you’ve learned today about Shakespeare. It can’t repeat a fact that someone else has already said before you.

  37. Entertainment in Elizabethan England LO: Can I relate to the historical and social setting which Shakespeare's plays were written? Starter: What do you do for fun/ entertainment?

  38. Shakespeare’s London • Entertainment • Watching criminals be hung or lose their heads • Tormenting inmates at insane asylums • Watching bear baiting OR • Seeing a play in a garden, pub or theatre Which would you prefer?

  39. Shakespeare’s Theatre What time did performances begin at the Globe Theatre? Ah, that’s easy! At 2 o’clock pm…if the flag was flying that is. If it wasn’t, it meant bad weather.

  40. Well, the Globe was 8 sided, with a little sloping thatched roof around the edges, but the centre was open to the sky! Wait…. Wasn’t there a roof on the theatre???

  41. Only those in the belly, or pit, of the theatre got wet. The belly is the bit in the middle, with no roof. The rich people would sit under the gallery roof, on nice cushions, but that cost a penny. So when it rained, everyone got wet?

  42. Aye, definitely. The groundlings as we called ‘em were a rough lot. Plus it was hard standing on your feet that long. So most people tried to get out of the belly, or pit, then?

  43. In the gallery you can see the front part of the stage thrusting out into the yard, with the audience on three sides. At the back of the stage there is a curtained alcove called the ‘tiring house’… What was it like sitting in the galleries?

  44. Yah, close enough. On the other side of the tiring house there are doors and exits that the actors come and go through. Above the tiring house is the gallery for musicians and for rich men who wanted to show off. You could even buy a stool and sit on the stage, if you wanted. Is the tiring room like a dressing room?

  45. Above the gallery is the hut – like a tiny house popping its head over the walls of the theatre. Here is kept the suspension gear used for flying effects, and the flag that announces the performance. What is above the gallery?

  46. It depended where they stood. You see, 2 columns rise from the stage and support a canopy over the rear part of the stage, in front of the tiring house. However, the front of the stage is open to the sky! Was the stage covered when it rained? Did the actors get wet too?

  47. Were there any cool ways that actors could enter the stage? Ah, yah! I love when they come up the trap door, which is in the middle of the stage. Lots of ghosts and spooky characters would come on stage through the trap door!

  48. What sort of plays did Shakespeare write? He mostly wrote comedies, tragedies and histories. There was a lot of romance in there too, and murders, ghosts, and fights galore.