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Architecture and Institutional Architects

Architecture and Institutional Architects

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Architecture and Institutional Architects

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  1. ArchitectureandInstitutional Architects “Working Architects Group” WAGv1: Barton, Fullerton, Gettes, Grady, Poepping, Wasley CSG Virginia.edu, May 2004

  2. “Architecture” • www.webster.com ar·chi·tec·ture 1 : the art or science of building; specifically : the art or practice of designing and building structures … 2 a : formation or construction as or as if as the result of conscious act b : a unifying or coherent form or structure ar·chi·tect Etymology: from Greek architektOn master builder mas·ter an original from which copies can be made • www.poepping.org architect one who creatively assembles known components with known behaviors

  3. IT Architecture • Not-exactly-known Components • Uncertain Behaviors, Complex Interactions • Not New but Not Commonly Understood

  4. Thesis • Domain-specific Architectures become their own stovepipe • Focus on Institution IT Architecture

  5. Introducing the WAG • What brought us together • Similar Roles • Similar Ambiguities • Similar Uncertainties • Similar Scotch • Our Goal – Better Understanding • Architecture Issues and Requirements • Institutional Architect Applicability • Common Issues, Range of Motion • Role/Approach/Skills/Value • Lots of Interest • Hard Problems, Expensive People

  6. What’s in it for You… • Our and other CIO’s • Address Expanding Complexity (Velocity) • Increasingly Interdependent Domains • Gap in today’s approach • Other Architects • Does this help you? Can you help? • Our Peers are our Institution • “what’s that guy do anyhow?”

  7. What’s in it for Us • Leverage in Collaboration • Strategy, Models, Method, Artifact • Technical Breadth • Help in understanding all this stuf • Benchmarking • Measurement, Improvement • Technologies • Group Therapy

  8. What’s the Issue?“More” • More Computing, More Applications • Not just the NOS anymore • SIS, ERP, Email, Cal/Sched • Network Access, VPN, VoIP, IM, Conferencing • CallCenter, Self-Help, Config Mgmt, Auto-Update • CourseWare, Collaboration, Repositories • Portal, Myriad Ad Hoc applets • Research Applications, Advanced Requirements • More Data • Identity, Privacy, Attributes, Roles, Authorizations • Network, Device, Service: Performance, Diagnostics

  9. And “Less” • For Users • Fewer, Easier Interfaces • Less Overlap • “Just Works” 7x24… • For Enterprises • Fewer Systems, Interfaces, Transformations • Reduce Low-Layer Complexity • Reduce Distributed Risk • Enable/Encourage Innovation at Higher Layer

  10. Our Usual Response • Abstract Commonality into Infrastructure • A Phase in a Cycle • Co-existent –> Interoperable –> Integrated -> Convergent • Commonly (Domain-capable) • Network, Platform, Presentation • Emerging (Cross-domain) • Enterprise Data • Middleware Services and Methods • Diagnostics

  11. Cross-Domain • Institutional Data • ERP + SIS, but clubs, projects, parking... • Other “data-of-interest” • Network Connectivity, Registered Devices, Performance • Middleware • Services • SSO, Identity/Attribute Management, Authorization, Service Location… • Methods • Web Services, Standards, Environments • Structured Design – leverage building blocks • Diagnostics • Management Console – Network plus Services

  12. The Gap:Interdependence and Complexity • Domain Arch Necessary, Not Sufficient • Convergence Across Disciplines • Complex New Interdependencies • Conflict in Domain-Specific Design Patterns • New Trade-offs Across Disciplines • Language Barriers between Disciplines • New Security/Privacy Exposures

  13. The Need:Institution Architecture • Effect • Rationalize Strategies, Focus/Balance Priorities • Inform, Influence Decisions • Improve Predictability • Role • Leverage Skills in Your Organization • Complement Management Team • Manage Influence • Capabilities - “Broad Depth” • Technical – Network, Security, Middleware, Systems, Application • Customer – Requirements Elicitation, Service Definition • Social – Organizational, Inter-personal, Writing, Presentation • Management – Planning, Tracking, Financing, Negotiation

  14. Toward Institution Architecture • “Common Themes and Range of Motion” • Responsibilities • Approach to Integration • Style/Skills of the Architect • Organizational Placement • Measurement of Value • A Sampling…

  15. Sample Responsibilities • Create and Maintain an Architecture • Artifacts/Processes/Templates • Standards/Roadmap/Vision • Team-based Creation (no vacuum) • JIT aspects – respond to Emerging Issues • Technology/Product Development • Opportunities – Edict or 900lb Gorilla

  16. More Responsibilities • Communicate and Interpret the Architecture • Evangelize and/or Intervene • Translate, Transform, Project • Consult on Project Definition (discovery) • Consult on Implementation (delivery) • Integrate the Architecture • Across Drivers; Between Domains; Over Time • Help to set Priorities for Operational Agenda

  17. Integration Institutional Goals Mission Customer Requirements Research, Analysis, Service Definition; “Opportunities” Standards Technical Strategies People, Project and Money Management Goal Budget Practices Ability to Execute Products Staff Skills/Expertise Technique

  18. Style/Skills • Broad Expertise, Pattern-Matcher • Write, Speak, LISTEN • Walk a Fine Line • Proclaim/Consult • Expert/Strategist • Gadfly/Catalyst • Leader/Facilitator • Other… • Tom’s Fomenter, Scott’s Omnigraffle Jockey • Michael’s Panache • A descent spellor

  19. Organizational Placement • Relationship to Management Structure • Relationship to Strategic Implementation • Reach: IT-local or Institution-wide • We are: • An Individual Reporting to CIO • A Small Group Reporting Below the CIO

  20. Measurement of Value • Click to Add Text • No, Really..

  21. Measurement of Value • How? • Empirical • Saved money • Count Surprises.. • Subjective • Feel Better • Not much to Share yet..

  22. Promises, Promises..In January we said… • Explore the Role • Anatomy of Influence; Architecture, but more… • Articulate and Synthesize • Review/cook approaches we’re trying out • Share the Story • Motivation, Assumptions, Politics • Scope, Outcomes, Interfaces • Models, Tools, Techniques • Order the Issues • Common Themes, Range of Motion, What we don’t know.. • 1/8/04 – CSG: Share the Concept • I2 Member mtg – Early models, directed feedback • May CSG – Policy discussion, broaden participation?

  23. What Next? • Click to add more text • Your click…

  24. What Next? • Barton, Gettes: Report at SAC • Your thoughts? • Worth additional Effort? • Formalism? • Value proposition? • Actions • Follow-up to CSG CIO’s?

  25. What Else? • Architect or Usual Suspect • Opportunities Abound – “Call for Participation” • Value of Contribution • External Commitments • Time Management

  26. WAG us • Please contact: Michael Gettes gettes@duke.edu Scott Fullerton fullerton@doit.wisc.edu David Wasley david.wasley@ucop.edu Tom Barton tbarton@uchicago.edu Michael Grady m-grady@uiuc.edu Mark Poepping poepping@cmu.edu

  27. Institutional Architecture WAGv1: Barton, Fullerton, Gettes, Grady, Poepping, Wasley CSG UVa, May 2004

  28. WAGtheDOGMA Working Architects Group Discovering Organizational Groupthink for Managing Architecture

  29. WAGtheDOGMA Working Architects Group Darn Odd Gamut of Mystifying Attitudes

  30. Institutional Architecture WAGv1: Barton, Fullerton, Gettes, Grady, Poepping, Wasley CSG UVa, May 2004

  31. Architecture • http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/memoranda/m97-16.html This memorandum transmits guidance to Federal agencies on the development and implementation of Information Technology Architectures. The Information Technology Architecture (ITA) describes the relationships among the work the agency does, the information the agency uses, and the information technology that the agency needs. It includes standards that guide the design of new systems. An ITA makes it easier to share information internally (e.g., agency-wide e-mail) and to reduce the number of information systems that perform similar functions. The ITA provides the technology vision to guide resource decisions that reduce costs and improve mission performance.