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Civil Society Organisations and land reform in Madagascar

Civil Society Organisations and land reform in Madagascar. RAMAROSON Mino SIF platform Vice-Chairwoman HARDI Director Rome, December 2008. CSOs and land issues. Background 1. 1960: Customary land management VS positive rights breakdown of the mechanism 1999: Reform proposition

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Civil Society Organisations and land reform in Madagascar

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  1. Civil Society Organisations and land reformin Madagascar RAMAROSON Mino SIF platform Vice-Chairwoman HARDI Director Rome, December 2008

  2. CSOs and land issues Background 1 1960: Customary land management VS positive rights • breakdown of the mechanism 1999: Reform proposition • Cadastral process simplified 2004: Reform proposition based on decentralisation and modernisation • Land policy Letter (February 2005)

  3. CSOs and land issues Background 2 NGOs and farmer’s organisations work on supporting farmers’ access to land (before 2002)  Great difficulties for each organisation to achieve their goals Meeting of the CSOs in Antananarivo to discuss land issues(2003)  SIF Platform created

  4. The land reformpolicy: First phase • HARDI’s experience with the National Land Reform Program Office -PNF : experimentation ofdecentralized land reform • SIF PLATFORM role • Raising awareness of local communities and Decentralized Territorial Collectivities • Advocacy to give an importance to the role of local authorities and local communities in the land access process • Offered to be a member of the PNF orientation and follow-up committee (Comité d’orientation et de suivi)

  5. The land reformpolicy:Second phase • PNF’s redirecting not suitable for HARDI’s principles and values • The SIF has become a consultative organisation only • Promoting land rights and raising awareness in the communities • Setting up a database to monitor land policy in Madagascar

  6. SIF platformdifficultiesin land policy monitoring • CSOs are often used by the PNF and the government to improve their image in front of donators • Lack of capacity to anticipate misuses of the land reform • Lack of communication between SIF members • Recognition of the local CSOs (SIF) by the authorities requires the support of international organisations (ILC) • No recognition of the CSOs by decentralized services and by central services’ staff

  7. SIF platformassetsin land policy monitoring • Agreement with the PNF: evolution and implementation of the reform follow-up • Platform solicited on particular points of the fundamental policy • Reactivity of the platform when problems occur • Representativeness and diversity of the members across all regions of Madagascar • Availability of tools to publicize the SIF’s ideas and perception of the current situation (newsletter, radio and television broadcast,…)

  8. Risks for SIF Members of the platform not powerful enough to assure the sustainability of the platform Intensity of the SIF’s willpower could decrease with the increase in the number member organizations Political takeover of the SIF image or name (the government, political opponents, etc.)

  9. Challenges Increasing the SIF’s renown Updating the information and database to anticipate the consequences of land pressure on the poor

  10. Thank you

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