Download
school libraries for the 21st century n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
School Libraries for the 21st Century PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
School Libraries for the 21st Century

School Libraries for the 21st Century

106 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

School Libraries for the 21st Century

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. School Libraries for the 21st Century What are adequate resources for Eagle Grove students & teachers?

  2. How adequate are our resources? • RBMS electronic collection analysis found: • Average publication year is 1988 • Recommended average year is 2000 • Recommended age for discard is 15 years

  3. How adequate are our resources? • Recommended age for discard is 15 years • 45 % of books recommended for discard • Number is approximately 3000 books

  4. Why weed? • Older books not attractive to today’s students • In science and health, new research makes the information outdated

  5. Why weed? • May be false or misleading • Events in history change the world • Terms change: “Native American” vs “American Indian”

  6. Why do we need new books? • Samples: • Book from 1974: Food Chains and Ecosystems • Book from 1998: Food Chains • Book from 1973: The Bug Clan • Book from 1995: Bugs: A closer look at the world’s tiny creatures • Website: Bug Bios

  7. Why do we still need books? • High quality children’s literature enriches students’ understanding • Emphasis at all levels on reading requires more books • Students need to be able to use a variety of sources

  8. Why do we still need books? • Libraries need different levels of books for different readers • Books are effective for visual learners • Teachers will not use books for teaching that are not up to date

  9. Why do we still need books? • Print resources often have more in-depth information • Print resources are reliable • Younger students are not as aware of problems with information on the Internet

  10. How many books are needed? • Iowa standards document: Plans for Progress 1992, Iowa Dept. of Education (updated for the 21st Century) • Collection minimum size of 7,500 for Middle School • Minimum: replace 5% per year = 375 • Ideal: replace 10% per year = 750

  11. What are the costs? • The average non-fiction book costs approximately $25 • 3,000 books X $25 =$75,000 • Over a 10 year recommended replacement period = 7,500/year

  12. What is a recommended budget? • Replacement of 375 books/year • 375 x average book $25 = 9,375 • 1 new book per year per student • $25 x 245 = $6,125 • $1,500 requisitioned in 2008

  13. How did we get here? • Inadequate budget to replace outdated materials • Increase in book prices, but little or no increase in budget to offset • Emphasis on technology

  14. How have we compensated? • Purchasing paperbacks • Scholastic book fairs • Small & larger grants from Jaycees, Wal-Mart, PTO, Farm Bureau, soup labels, donations, garage sales, public library sales

  15. How have we compensated? • Textbook $$ used at the high school • Retaining older books so shelves aren’t empty

  16. How important is this? • Studies in Colorado, Ohio, Hawaii, and Iowa • Direct correlation shown between well equipped libraries and student reading achievement • Simply: more & better books = more reading = higher reading achievement & test scores

  17. Resources • Resource Alignment: Providing Curriculum Support in the School Library media Center by Karen R. Lowe • Plans for Progress into the 21st Century: A Guide to Planning for School Library Media Programs by Becky Stover Johnson