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Transitional Justice Working Group Initiative The Road to Peace in Liberia: Citizens Views on PowerPoint Presentation
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Transitional Justice Working Group Initiative The Road to Peace in Liberia: Citizens Views on

Transitional Justice Working Group Initiative The Road to Peace in Liberia: Citizens Views on

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Transitional Justice Working Group Initiative The Road to Peace in Liberia: Citizens Views on

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  1. Transitional Justice Working Group Initiative The Road to Peace in Liberia: Citizens Views on Transitional Justice August-September, 2004 GREENBERG QUINLAN ROSNER RESEARCH INC SUBAH-BELLEH ASSOCIATES

  2. A New Liberia “I appeal to the government that let this new Liberia be a new Liberia and what has happened should be in the past. Everybody should be given rights and let us build a new Liberia.” - Female, Nimba County

  3. Country Direction

  4. Bryant Job Approval

  5. Thermometer Ratings: Government Mean Score on a Scale from 0-100

  6. Faction Leaders in Transitional Government

  7. Effectiveness of DDRR

  8. Duration of Peace

  9. Progress Made

  10. Economic Progress

  11. Concerns 54

  12. DDRR Process

  13. Liberian Government Efforts

  14. UNMIL Efforts

  15. Justice System

  16. Progress in Justice Issues

  17. Thermometer Ratings: TRC Mean Score on a Scale from 0-100

  18. War Experiences

  19. Dealing With the Past

  20. Prosecution of War Figures

  21. Addressing the War and Abuses For those willing to admit their crimes, there would be no formal legal proceedings or prosecution. For those unwilling to admit to crimes, there would be formal legal proceedings and prosecution Only target leaders and commanders of warring factions identified as committing or ordering abuses, and subject them to formal legal action and prosecution. Confront and document the abuses through a written record, but without identifying individuals responsible for the abuses and without holding formal legal proceedings and prosecutions Prosecute excombatants and leaders of warring factions who committed abuses, but avoid widespread public discussion about the abuses

  22. Actions for Peace and Reconciliation Create a written record of all the abuses that happened during the war Create a special court to prosecute faction leaders and punish those found guilty of committing human rights violations Create a truth crime tribunal where people can tell their stories about what they did during the war without fear of prosecution Give amnesty to all combatants who turn in their weapons   Give amnesty to all combatants who turn in their weapons, including faction leaders Create a special court to prosecute combatants and punish those found guilty of committing human rights violations Jail faction leaders for crimes committed during the war Jail combatants for crimes committed during the war

  23. Written Record Quote “If there is no record, no advice will be given and I will continue to do it [crimes]. So at least if we can forgive we shouldn’t forget our records, so when it has been written and documented, you know what is wrong and can’t do it in the future. ” - Female,Bong County

  24. Eligible for Amnesty Excombatants who have turned in their weapons All Excombatants Faction leaders and commanders, even those that ordered combatants to kill, rape and torture civilians during the war Faction leaders and commanders

  25. Granting Amnesty

  26. TRC Hearings

  27. Current or New Courts to Judge War Abuses

  28. Composition of Special Court Liberians or Foreigners?

  29. Foreigners in New Court Quote “It is going to be Liberians who face the courts. If the judges are Liberians, they will want to back each other, but if a foreigner comes in the truth will be unveiled.” - Female, Bong County

  30. Thermometer Ratings: International Mean Score on a Scale from 0-100

  31. Need for the International Community

  32. Victims Compensation

  33. Original Origins Plan to Return From county Forced to move Moved voluntarily Yes No

  34. Home County – Those that Moved

  35. Home County - IDPs

  36. Excombatant Reintegration

  37. Reintegration Quote “They should be accepted because we are talking about forgiveness, healing, we are talking about being patriots and so we should accept them in the community .” - Male Community Leader, Monrovia

  38. Reintegration Quote “If I am not welcome, I will come back and ask you to carry me so as to talk to my people to forgive me because as we are talking about peace, everybody needs to forgive each other.” - Bomi excombatant

  39. Charles Taylor Committed War Crimes

  40. Taylor Punishment

  41. October 2005 Elections

  42. Key Findings • Liberians are optimistic about the future of Liberia and have seen progress made in many areas, but more needs to be done, especially in terms of economic conditions, education and the justice system. • Liberians also feel that the government is doing too little, particularly in respect to non-combatants. • While Liberians want to put the past behind them, this does not mean they want to forget about the past. • Liberians are strongly in favor of having a written record. But a written record alone will not suffice.

  43. Key Findings • Holding truth crime tribunals where excombatants can publicly admit their wrongs without fear of retribution is the most approved manner to address the war. This was also strongly approved by excombatants, so would be the best mechanism to bring excombatants into the justice system. • While most Liberians do not want to prosecute excombatants, there is a strong desire to prosecute faction leaders and commanders and hold them accountable. • Liberians do not think the current court system can handle the prosecutions of war crimes and desire a special court comprised of both Liberians and foreigners.

  44. Key Findings • Liberians think they can not go it alone and need assistance from the international community. • There is also a strong desire to reintegrate excombatants back into their communities.