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PMI® Academic Resources Program Overview

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  1. PMI® Academic Resources Program Overview

  2. PMI’s Core Purpose To advance the practice, science and profession of project management.

  3. Why be concerned with “academic” research? • THEORIES • SOLUTIONS • PRACTICES • BEST PRACTICES • STANDARDS

  4. Growth in Project Management Projects account for 20% of the world GDP Industry demand for trained project managers is on the rise Dramatic increase in academic interest in project management PMJ Editorial. Vol. 38(2) p 3-4, 2007

  5. Anbari, F and Kwak, Y: The Impact on PM of Allied Disciplines. Project Management Institute, 2008

  6. PMI Academic Resources Program • Developed in 1997 • Works to advance the discipline and profession of project management. • Only PM Advocacy Organization with a dedicated research program • PMI has invested more than US $14 million in project management research. • We believe that academic research informs the practice of project management and that the real-world application of its results sparks further research.

  7. The Catalyst Sharing &Application Needs Discovery ™

  8. Academic Member Advisory Group Chris Stevens, PhD – Consultant, Australia Terry Williams, PhD, PMP – Southampton Univ., UK Martina Huemann, PhD – WU Wien - Vienna University of Economics and Business J.C. Nogueira, PhD-Consultant, Uruguay Audrey Curtis, PhD – Stevens Institute of Technology, US Marge Combe–Vernal Management Consulting, US Harvey Maylor, PhD – Cranfield University, UK V.K. Narayanan, PhD- Drexel University, US

  9. The program creates new knowledge through: • Sponsored Research Projects • Doctoral Research Grants • Special projects • PMI Survey Links Program

  10. The program dispenses knowledge through: • Research Publications • Academic Journals • Research and Education Conferences • Research Working Sessions

  11. The PMI Sponsored Research Program Each year PMI invests in a number of research projects from around the globe through a formal call for proposals that • Have direct application to some aspect of the project management body of knowledge or its practice. • Involve multi-disciplinary teams of scholars or teams consisting of scholars and practitioners. The 2010 Award Recipients will be announced January 2011

  12. PMI Educational Foundation Doctoral Research Grant Program • A new program supporting doctoral research in project, program, and/or portfolio management. • Program administered jointlyby Academic Resources and PMIEF • Call for Proposals announced twice each calendar year. • Applications accepted from part-time and full-time doctoral students at accredited colleges and universities. The next call for proposals will be 15 May 2010 -1 July 2010.

  13. PMI Research and Education Conference • An international project management research and education event held biennially for the past decade. • Features plenary speakers, peer-reviewed papers, symposia, general and student posters, and educational tracks. The 2010 Research and Education Conference will be held 11-14 July 2010 in Washington, DC, USA

  14. 2010 Research and Education Conference Washington D.C., July 11-14, 2010 at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center Sponsorship opportunities/packages available now on pmi.org.

  15. PMI Research Open Working Sessions (ROWS) • Held in conjunction with PMI Global Congresses • Single topic selected each year • Feature panel discussions and breakout sessions • An opportunity for researchers, academics, and advanced practitioners to gather and exchange ideas Upcoming ROWS: 8 May 2010 – Milan, Italy 24 September 2010 – Brazil 9 October 2010 – Washington, DC, USA

  16. The Research Track at PMI Congress • Papers presented on research topics with a clear application to the practice of project management. • Applied research validates theoretical methods and processes that are new to project management and demonstrate the value of research to real-world problems and applications. • Volunteer opportunity available for serving on the Research Track Review Committee

  17. PMI Survey Links Program • Provides established and student researchers working on project management topics an opportunity to reach a larger pool of qualified respondents. • Provides access to current research surveys as well as results of past surveys from the program. • Participation is strictly voluntary. • Posted surveys on PMI.org are non-commercial and meet PMI program guidelines.

  18. Contact Academic Resources For questions regarding: • Sponsored Research Program • Doctoral Research Program • Survey Links • Online Community Contact Brianne Bangma, Research Coordinator at brianne.bangma@pmi.org For questions regarding: • Research Program Working Sessions at Congress • Research Track at Congress • Biennial Research Conference • Related Publications • Research Awards • Academic and Education Programs and Services Workshops Contact Sallie Makar, Research Coordinator at sallie.makar@pmi.org

  19. Change Management: Familiar Ground and New Territory in Project Management 9. May 2010, 8.00 – 15.30

  20. Objectives Get an understanding on change and change management and perceive change from the individual as well as the organisational perspective. Clarify the relationships between changes, processes, programs, and projects; Understand projects and programs as a means to organize for change (in the permanent organization) Differentiate and reflect change management and project management roles Reflect the necessary changes in Human Resource Management, when implementing a project-oriented company Exchange between researchers and practitioners, experience working forms applied in change processes NON objectives Consider changes within projects and programs

  21. Introduction to change management By Martina Huemann & Marge Combe 8:15 – 9:15

  22. What is change? Change is the process of becoming different. “To exist is to change, to change is to mature, to mature is to go on creating oneself endlessly.” – Henri Bergson

  23. Change may be….. • Evolutionary • Occurs very slowly over time • Adaptation is in small, sometimes almost imperceptible steps • Success dependent on recognizing change is occurring • Examples: • Disappearance of dinosaurs • Culture shift in an organization • Revolutionary • Happens in one or only a few strokes in short time frame • Adaptation must occur rapidly • Success dependent on acceptance and engagement in change • Examples: • 9/11 • Becoming a parent • Merger

  24. Objects of Change Social Systems • Individuals and Social Systems Interactions Societies Organizations Temporary Organizations Permanent Organizations Companies Divisions Departments Programmes Projects (based on Niklas Luhmann)

  25. Projects & Change Projects and programs as objects to change Project crisis Project controlling Not focus of today! Projects and programs to organize for change in the permanent organization 27

  26. Change Processes (Levy & Merry) Examples 1st order change: e.g. introduction of a new product 2nd order Change: e.g. acquisition of an organization

  27. Model: Identity of the Organization(Gareis & Stummer 2006) • Structures • Objectives and strategies • Services, products, technologies • Organizational structure, culture • Personnel • Infrastructure • Budget, financing • Context • Relevant social environments • History and expectations regarding the future Organization Context

  28. Change Types (Gareis 2010) high Radical new-positioning Second Order Transforming Demand for Change Developing First Order Organizationallearning low low high Potential to Change

  29. Exercise & expectations By Martina Huemann & Marge Combe

  30. Changes &Projects Roland Gareis

  31. Objects of change, reasons for change 33

  32. Social Systems as Objects of Change Social Systems Interactions Societies Organizations Temporary Organizations Permanent Organizations Companies Divisions Departments Programmes Projects 34

  33. Model: Identity of the Organization Structures Objectives and strategies Services, products, technologies Organizational structure, culture Personnel Infrastructure Budget, financing Context Relevant social environments History and expectations regarding the future Organization Context 35

  34. Reasons for Change Interventions from relevant social environments e.g. owner, clients, employees, supplier Self-organization, self-reference e.g. strategy workshops, controlling Clients Owner Organization Employees …. 36

  35. Change types 37

  36. Life Cycle of an Organization historiography conception continuous development close-down establishment stability discontinuous development Phases of continuous development • growth: new product, cooperation, formalization • decline: exiting a market Phases of discontinuous development • growth: acquisition, merger, market entry • decline: outsourcing, re-scoping 38

  37. Change Processes (Levy & Merry) • Examples • 1st order change: e.g. introduction of a new product • 2nd order Change: e.g. acquisition of an organization 39

  38. Change Processes high Radical new-positioning Second Order Transforming Demand for Change Furtherdeveloping First Order Organizationallearning low low high Potential to Change 40

  39. Managing different changes 41

  40. Organizational Learning 42

  41. Organizational Learning: Processes Stabilizing new knowledge Aquiring new knowledge Daily Business Phases: Identifying and securing Providing know-how and unlearning Phases:Training Documenting Reflecting Management by Projects:Repetitive processes performed by the line organization or within the scope of projectsNo temporary organizations required 43

  42. Further Developing 44

  43. Further Developing: Processes Conceptionalizing a development Piloting a development Rolling-out a development Daily Business Phases:Detailed planning, applying, documenting, evaluating Phases: Information gathering, analyzing, defining objectives, rough planning Phases: Detailed planning, designing, testing, applying, evaluating,rough planning • Management by Projects: • Coceptionalizing: A work group or a project • Piloting: A project • Rolling-out: A project or a programme 45

  44. Radical New-Positioning 46

  45. Radical New-Positioning: Processes Planning the crisis resolution Performing the crisis resolution Daily Business • Phases: • Defining the crisis • Defining the communication strategy • Rough crisis analysis • Implementing ad hoc measures • Detailed planning • Developing organisational & individual competences • Phases: • Implementing selected strategies and measures • Controlling implemented measures • Crisis communication • Crisis close-down • Management by Projects: • Planning: A task force, no project • Performing: A programme 47

  46. Transforming 48

  47. Transforming: Processes Planning the transformation Stabilizing the organization Implementing the transformation Daily Business • Phases: • Detailed planning, quick wins • Developing transformation competences • Changing strategies, services, processes, structures, etc. • Communicating • Phases: • Interrupting the routine • Analyzing the situation • Defining a vision • Rough planning • Making decisions • Phases: • Integrating new values, into daily business • Communicating • Management by Projects: • Planning: Work group or project • Implementing: Project or programme • Stabilizing: Project or programme 49

  48. Case study: Transforming the RGC: RGC2013 50