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STRATEGY for a New DIRECTION : “ SKILLED LABOUR EXPORT STRATEGY ” PowerPoint Presentation
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STRATEGY for a New DIRECTION : “ SKILLED LABOUR EXPORT STRATEGY ”

STRATEGY for a New DIRECTION : “ SKILLED LABOUR EXPORT STRATEGY ”

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STRATEGY for a New DIRECTION : “ SKILLED LABOUR EXPORT STRATEGY ”

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  1. STRATEGY for a New DIRECTION:“SKILLED LABOUR EXPORT STRATEGY” VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational College “Center of Vocational Education & Training” - Vietnam – Canada & Australia - Mr. Nguyen Ngoc My Chairman of VABIS Group October 2010

  2. Introduction(1 of 3) If we look at the current state of the world we can see that all economies are hurting. However, with the economic turmoil and cyclical downturns, one thing has remained consistent: a demand for Skilled Labour. Most developed nations like Canada and Australia have been in dire need of Skilled Workers for over the past 2 decades. The demand has now become desperate and critical in many areas of industry.   Canada, in particular, has responded to their need for Skilled Labour by reaching out to a few nations (Vietnam, Philippines and Ukraine) for help. Vietnam is one of these important nations. The problem of the past in Vietnam has been a lack of reputable institutions to step up to meet these needs.   “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  3. Introduction(2 of 3) VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational College (VHLIVC)is now truly the first and leading Vietnam Vocational Education and Training Institution to have a marketable plan that makes sense-a program based on quality that is committed to meeting International Standards. By focusing on the Skilled Trades that are in greatest demand, Domestic and Overseas, VHLIVCwill go through a “2-Tiered” Program approach recruit, educate, train, and prepare Skilled Tradespeople to work and live overseas (Canada & Australia). The secret is to make this a seamless process and readily available for supplying to the much needed demand. The “First Tier” is a 2-Year comprehensive International Acclaimed Vocational and Training Program which takes a student through a cooperative training process with outside companies (Domestic and Overseas) to enable students to receive valuable on-the-job training and get the real-life experience to prepare them for their future workplaces.   “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  4. Introduction(3 of 3) These newly recruits will also receive Native English Lessons and Canadian/Australian Culture Training to acclimatize them to their future overseas home and new working environment. The importance of this cannot be emphasized enough. The “Second Tier” is 6-Month comprehensive and rigorous International Acclaimed Vocational and Training Program which is a retraining and acclimatization program with focuses on recruiting well experienced workers that are seasoned professionals in their respective trades. The primary focus here will be to upgrade their existing skills to meet International Standards, while teaching them to communicate effectively in their future workplace and acclimatizing them to culture of their new future overseas homes (Canada and Australia).  “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  5. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (1 of 17) INCREASING DEMAND FOR SKILLED LABOUR IN VIETNAM 55% of the Population is in work active age (20 to 59), an advantage for the economy, but also a pressure to provide jobs. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  6. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (2 of 17) INCREASING DEMAND FOR SKILLED LABOUR IN VIETNAM (continued) SOUTH EAST AREA: * 7% of Vietnam’s total Land Area; 14.7% of the Population (12.8 Million). Rapidly industrializing: 40% of Country’s Industry Zones. * Increase in Population: 3% per year, due mainly to migration from Mekong Delta, Central and Northern regions (Employment shift from Agriculture to Industry and Services). “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  7. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (3 of 17) INCREASING DEMAND FOR SKILLED LABOUR IN VIETNAM (continued) High Demand and Immediate Need to Educate and Train young People in High Skilled Labour to improve Domestic Industry’s overall Productivity and Competitiveness. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  8. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (4 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • Law on Vocational Education and Training (VET)-#76/2006/QH-11: • Enterprises have rights to establish their own VET Institutions to • meet their own Labour Needs and those of society. • Enterprises have rights to cooperate with VET Institutions to • organize Training, Research, Transfer of Technology. • Certain Corporate taxable Income Tax Preferences. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  9. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (5 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Government Regulations-Decree # 139/2006/NĐ-CP: • A. “Development Scheme” of Vocational Education and Training • (VET) – Companies: • 1. To Provide Provincial Labour Department (DOLISA) • information on their Labour Needs and Use. • 2. Can Establish their own VET Institutions or cooperate with • other VET Institutions to provide Theoretical and Practical • Vocational Education and Training in their premises. • 3. To Participate in the Development of Competency Standards • and Skills Assessment. • 4. To Assist in the Provision of Financial and Equipment Resources • for Vocational Education and Training (VET). “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  10. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (6 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Government Regulations-Decree # 139/2006/NĐ-CP: • B. “Cooperation Scheme” with Vocational Education and Training • (VET) Institutions – Companies: • 1. To Accept VET students for Visits, Practice (based on • written agreement with VET Institutions). • 2. To Participate in Teaching, Practical Instructions and • Assessment of Learning Outcomes of VET students. • 3. To Participate in the Development of Programs and Curricula. • 4. To Sign Training Contracts with VET Institutions on behalf of • employees when needed. • 5. To Co-operate with VET Institutions in organizing Research, Production, Transfer and Application of Technology. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  11. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (7 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Government Regulations-Decree # 139/2006/NĐ-CP: • C.Vocational Education and Training (VET) and Skills • Development – Companies: • 1. To Develop and Implement VET and Skills Development plans • for own employees. • 2. To Sign VET Contract with new employees who were recruited • as trainees. • 3. To Facilitate on-the-job Training for Skills Development. • 4. To Train employees before moving them to new jobs. • 5. To Pay VET students on practice if they directly participate in • production (mutually agreed level of payment). “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  12. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (8 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Government Target - by 2020: • 27.5 Million people to be trained, including 10 Million rural people: • 55% of which is in the VET Colleges and Centers. • 90% of VET Learners to be employed: • 70% of them in the areas of Trades that they learned. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  13. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (9 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Government Policy - VET Network by 2020: • 230 Senior VET Colleges. • 310 Junior (Secondary) VET Colleges. • 1050 VET Centers. • Development of Competency Standards and Curricula on international Level. Encouragement of using Foreign Curricula (from developed countries). • All VET Institutions to be accredited. • National Skills Testing and Certification for 8 Million People. • 60% of training capacity covered by non-public (private) VET Institutions. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  14. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (10 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Government Policy - Some Orientations by 2020: • To Develop Mechanism and Policies facilitating the key Role of Industry in Vocational Education and Training (VET). • Establishment of own VET Institutions. • Association with VET Institutions in Training and Employment. • Provision of Work Placement (Practice) for VET students. • Encouragement of on-the-job VET. • Direct Involvement of Industry Representatives (Professional Societies) in Development of Policies, Strategies, Plans and Implementation of Vocational Education and Training (VET). • Enterprises to involve directly in VET Activities: Setting Objectives, Content and Methodology of VET participation in Skills Assessment… “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  15. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (11 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Vocational Education and Training (VET) Vietnam in General: • Tuition is low because of Government Subsidy to all public VET Colleges and Centers. • Tuition in Non-public VET Colleges is Market Driven. • Nearly all other Non-public VET Colleges and Centers focus exclusively on White Collar Trades (Accounting, IT, Graphic Design, Secretarial and Office Occupations), with Low Investment and High Return. • VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational College’s(VHLIVC) VET Model focuses mainly on Heavy Industry relatedSkills Trades: … • VHLIVC is an Exception among Private VET Colleges and Centers. • A real Challenge to its Investor in terms of Financial Resources. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  16. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (12 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Vocational Education and Training (VET) Vietnam in General:… • VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational College’s(VHLIVC) VET Model focuses mainly on Heavy Industry relatedSkills Trades: … • Capital Expenditure (CapEx): Substantial Amount of Investment-Purchase of associated advanced Equipment based on International (Canada & Australian) Standards for VET. • Operational Expenditure (OpEx): High Cost of Operations- • Campus Lease from Government (Public VET Colleges and Centers: FREE). • Cost of International VET Programs (Course Wares-Box Hill TAFE). “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  17. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (13 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Cooperation with Industry: • Current Environment for the Cooperation: • Human Resource Practice of Companies: • Low Investment in Skilled Labour (High Cost). • Recruitment from Labour Market. • Additional In-house Training of new workers due to unsatisfactory Performance/Skills. • Apprenticeship nearly non existent (Too Long, Too Expensive, Low Loyalty). • Many Companies want to see VET Colleges and Centers as Manpower supplying Enterprises (to save costs). • No Tax Preference Scheme by Government to Enforce and Encourage Cooperation with VET Colleges and Centers. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  18. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (14 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Cooperation with Industry:… • Reasons for Cooperation with Industry: • Educational: • Most VET Colleges and Centers can only arrange maximum 2 months of Industry Practice and the end of two or three (3) year programs. • VHLIVC’s Model is an adaptation of Canadian and Australian Apprenticeship to local conditions whereas fee paying students practice 50% of time in companies and 25% on campus in their two (2) year program (of 2000 hrs). “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  19. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (15 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Cooperation with Industry:… • Reasons for Cooperation with Industry… • Enrolment Number: • As Tuition gradually increased to reflect costs, number of our enrolments decreased (current crisis in tertiary sector of education also plays a significant role). • We expect Students to be paid while on company practice. This is to reinforce Students self-confidence and relieve part of the burden of tuition to Parents. • Our preference for Student Practice: Foreign-Invested Companies or International Industry Projects of Vietnamese Companies (Good Work Practice, Strict Safety Compliance). • Greater attractiveness lead to higher enrolment. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  20. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (16 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Cooperation with Industry:… • College Income Sources: • Subsidy from the Investor (Hong Lam Tan Thanh Co., Ltd.) • Tuition from Day Students. • Contract Training for Employees of Companies. • Other Incomes. • Subsidy will Diminish with Time. • Tuition from regular Day Students will be Main Source of Income. • Contract Training will also be a Significant Source of Income. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  21. Vietnam Labour Market Scenario (17 of 17) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) IN VIETNAM • (continued) • Cooperation with Industry:… • With High Tuition, the only Way out is to closely Cooperate with Companies to: • Jointly Develop VET Models where: • Students are paid on Practice at Companies to offset part of their Tuition Cost, gain Real Work Experience to reinforce their Skills, Work Attitude. • Companies utilize Skills, save Costs in using practicing Students and recruit the best before their Graduation. • Win Contracts in Training their existing/new Employees. • Past and Current Projects and Partners: “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  22. Executive Summary (1 of 3) • SKILLED MIGRATION TO CANADA & AUSTRALIA • Economic Migration: • Canada and Australia are global exemplars of nation-building through government planned and administered economic, family and Humanitarian Migration Programs. By 2005, Australia included the world’s highest percentage of foreign-born residents (24.6% of the population, with over 240 nationalities) followed by Canada at 19.2% and the US at 11.7% (Miller 2005). • Within the past decade, Canada and Australia have also placed extraordinary emphasis on the recruitment of migrants with skills. In 2004, Canada selected 133,746 people in the economic category, in particular substantial numbers of points-tested Principal Applicants qualified in the professions. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  23. Executive Summary (2 of 3) • SKILLED MIGRATION TO CANADA & AUSTRALIA • Economic Migration: (continued) • Skilled Migrants constituted 59.6% of Canada’s total planned intake at this time (224,346 people), far exceeding the targets set for family (51,500-56,800) and refugee/humanitarian (30,800-33,800) entrants. • The proportion of economic migrants selected by Australia in 2004-2005 was virtually identical to Canadian levels (58%), based on 77,800 applicants out of a permanent migrant/humanitarian intake of 133,000 people, with the 2005-2006 target since set substantially higher (97,500) (Birrell, Hawthorne & Richardson 2006). • All these figures are increasing on an annual basis. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  24. Executive Summary (3 of 3) • SKILLED MIGRATION TO CANADA & AUSTRALIA • Economic Migration: (continued) • Despite numerical similarity in terms of Skilled Migration Programs, primary sources for Economic Migrants now vary markedly between Canada and Australia. • Canada has placed unprecedented reliance in the recent period on migration from developing countries, most notably China (18%), India (11%), Philippines (7%), Pakistan (4%) and Romania (4%). While China and India feature strongly in Australia’s Skilled Migration Program, it has continued to maintain strong UK/Ireland and South African flows – the top 5 source countries for 2004-2005 being the UK/Ireland (25%), India (13%), China (11%), South Africa (5%) and Malaysia (5%). “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  25. Overview - VET Industry (1 of 12) VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING(VET) Vocational Education and Training (VET), synonymous with Career and Technical Education (CTE), prepares individuals for the world of work through the acquisition of knowledge, skills (hard, soft, people, life) and competencies in an occupational field. The term "VET" or "CTE" continues to evolve and is known to take on other names, alternatives include Technical Vocational Education and Training, Workforce Education, Technical Education, Apprenticeship Training, and others. CTE is used in some economies to reflect an emphasis on careers and lifelong learning, while others refer to VET, a name that was adopted by the UNESCO-UNEVCO International Center.  “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  26. Overview - VET Industry (2 of 12) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET)(continued) • VET/CTE programs are generally organized by educational or workforce development agencies at the secondary level to provide students with a sequence of course work that builds foundational career knowledge and specific technical skills and can lead to an occupational degree or certification specialty. • Vocational Education and Training (VET) around an occupation may include those activities that are more traditionally "hands on" in nature, such as Construction Workers, Welders, Electricians, Machinists and Plumbers to Health or Service sector jobs like Nurses and Business Sales Executives. • VET/CTE in some economies encompasses certain Engineering and Technology fields as well.  “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  27. Overview - VET Industry(3 of 12) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING(VET)(continued) • The VET/CTE pathway often requires enrolment in and mastery of academic subjects as a condition for graduation.  However, in some economies the VET/CTE program may be more narrowly defined, mainly focuses on developing individual's technical skills. • Policymakers’ interest is high in identifying Strategies and Implementation for strengthening VET/CTE models.  Many current VET/CTE systems suffer from: • * Low-Quality and out-of-date Instruction. • * Fragmented Instruction that fails to provide Lifelong • Learning Opportunities for Career Development and • Training. • * Lack of Modern Technology incorporated into Students’ • Education and Training.  “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  28. Overview - VET Industry (4 of 12) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET)(continued) • APEC economies are increasingly looking for Models, Strategies and Implementation as well as VET/CTE promising Practices for improving their Vocational Education and Training (VET) Systems to address both their current and long-term needs for well-trained Workforces.  • But stellar examples exist along the Pacific Rim of high-quality career preparation and technical Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems that could be models for others of ways to strengthen VET/CTE for effectively equipping students with the skills required for meeting the demands of a 21st Century Workforce (New Contexts, New Job Skills, Global Citizenship): • In many occupations, the nature of work in the 21st century will be quite different from work in prior century. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  29. Overview - VET Industry (5 of 12) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET)(continued) • But stellar examples exist…demands of a 21st Century Workforce (New Contexts, New Job Skills, Global Citizenship): (continued) • This realization is moving all APEC Economies to provide high- quality VET Systems to prepare today's Students for the Workforce of tomorrow. • Three (3) trends signal the increasing demand and rewards for those who bring special technical and workplace skills to the labour force as well as the reduced rewards for those who lack higher-level skills and are only able to perform routine work: Advances in Information Technologies (IT) enable the substitution of computers for routine work-- “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  30. Overview - VET Industry (6 of 12) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET)(continued) • Three (3) trends signal… are only able to perform routine work: • … work--such as grocery product readers, voice recognition answering machines, and robotics on assembly lines. Aided by computers, Skilled Workers can experience productivity benefits that turn into higher earnings. • Globalization increases the importance of trade in the world economy which raises world productivity and earnings overall, but also creates world markets for labour in which those economies with the most productive workers gain competitive advantage over economies and workers who are less productive. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  31. Overview - VET Industry (7 of 12) • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET)(continued) • Three (3) trends signal… are only able to perform routine work: Workers with adaptable skills benefit as the days of one-industry employment for a lifetime are diminishing and the norm is for a person to have 8 to 12 jobs in different sectors over their life span.   • Workers today need solid Academic and Technical Skills, and those in demand will ideally have proficiency in 21st Century Competencies, including the ability to Think Critically, Problem Solve, and Communicate. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  32. Overview - VET Industry (8 of 12) • VET/CTE BY TYPE OF PROVIDER • 21st Century Economies characterized by rapid technological change challenge providers to offer VET/CTE that is up-to-date, relevant and yet sufficiently broad to enable learners to have career adaptability. Three (3) important providers of VET/CTE are: • A.“Secondary Schools” which may start career awareness in the lower Secondary grades (7-9) and provide more specific occupational skills at the upper secondary level (grades 10-12). Balancing Academic and Technical Skills is a particular Secondary School challenge, as is creating a positive image for career and Technical Secondary Education and Schools. Singapore's Institute for Technical Education (ITE) is a Singapore Quality Harvard Innovation award-winning technical education… “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  33. Overview - VET Industry (9 of 12) • VET/CTE BY TYPE OF PROVIDER (continued) • A.“Secondary Schools” …provider at the upper Secondary and beyond level serving the lowest 25% of achievers operating within a World-class Academic Education System. ITE has maintained a high 90% satisfaction rate from employers with the graduate employment rate for a 5-Month job search period also consistently at 90%.  • B.2-year “Postsecondary Education Institutions” serve as a bridge to work or more advanced Postsecondary Academic Training.  The U.S. Community Colleges are an excellent example of low-cost providers that integrate Academic and Technical Training geared towards local labour market conditions. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  34. Overview - VET Industry (10 of 12) • VET/CTE BY TYPE OF PROVIDER (continued) • B.Two-year “Postsecondary Education Institutions”...They are also well-known for allowing more able attendees to continue on to a 4-year Collegiate Education. • C.“Industry-Based Training” is carried out by a particular industry or company. Industry training may cover general competencies in personal areas such as Leadership or Teamwork or Academic competencies (for example, Computer Skills or Data Analyses). • Specific skills are commonly covered relating to particular jobs, such as Welding, Construction or Invoice Preparation. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  35. Overview - VET Industry (11 of 12) • VET/CTE BY TYPE OF PROVIDER (continued) • C.“Industry-Based Training”… • Apprenticeship Programs are one historically common form of industry training where entry-level learners are trained and mentored on the job. Japan is an Economy that is a leader in Industry-Based Training of all types, relying on enterprises rather than the formal education sector for a considerable amount of occupationally-specific training. • VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational College (VHLIVC)is an excellent combination of all three (3) of these VET Type Provider. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  36. Overview - VET Industry (12 of 12) • FUTURE VISIONS OF VET/CTE • Recognition and Emphasis on Informal Learning. • Networking of Institutions and also with Local and Regional • Stakeholders. • International Perspectives in Training. • Use of IT/ICT and Digital Networks. • Need for Learner Autonomy and Self-directed Learning. • Competence Requirements for Pedagogical, Networking and • Communications Skills for Trainers. • Organizational Competence Development. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  37. VET Service Providers - Domestic(1 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • - “CENTER OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING” - • Located in industrial town of Phu My, South East Vietnam, 75km from Ho Chi Minh City by road, 2km from Industrial Zones: Oil & Gas, Power Generation (Phu My Power Plant Complex 4,000 MW, 35% of Vietnam's total Electricity), Fertilizers, Steel, Shipbuilding, Deep Water Ports… “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  38. VET Service Providers - Domestic(2 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational College(VHLIVC) was established on 15th May, 2007 under the business name of Hong Lam Tan Thanh Co., Ltd.; operating as Hong Lam Vocational College (HLVC)-a company of VABIS Group and a privately owned institution. Inaugurated on 25 October, 2007, HLVC has been under operation for about 3 years. Later it was renamed from Hong Lam Vocational College (HLVC) to Hong Lam International Vocational College (HLIVC) by provincial government decision in September 2009. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  39. VET Service Providers - Domestic(3 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • Vision: • “To Become a International-Class of the Highest of Standard Vocational College Serving the Immediate Needs of Local and Domestic Industries as well as near Future Demand of Overseas Markets for Highly Skilled Labour”. • “To Contribute to Vietnam’s Industrialization Initiatives in particular and Globalization Initiatives in general via Vocational Education and Training, Research and Development as well as Internship and Cooperative Activities”. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  40. VET Service Providers - Domestic(4 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • Mission Statement: • “To Provide a Flexible, Multi-Disciplinary Environment for High Quality Vocational Education and Training (VET) using the latest Technologies and Expertise”. • “To Achieve Excellence in Vocational Education and Training (VET) Services within the College, Country and International Communities”. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  41. VET Service Providers - Domestic(5 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • The Value Proposition: • “Setting the Bar for the Best-Value Vocational Education and Training (VET) and Building a Successful Business based on Creating Brand Value around bringing great Vocation Education and Training (VET) to Vietnam”. • Core Values: • “Academic Freedom and Integrity, Credibility, High Quality and Ethical Vocational Education and Training (VET) ”. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  42. VET Service Providers - Domestic(6 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • The main role of VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational College (VHLIVC) is to provide Vocational Education and Training (VET) opportunities for the Technical Workforce of Vietnam as well as Canada and Australia markets through upgrading professional skills in a workplace and providing VET through Apprenticeship Schemes, Training Programs and intensive CONSTRUCTION Industry 2-Year and 6-Month Short Course Training. • VET, to be effective, should serve as a bridge between Employers’ needs and those of work seekers and this can only be achieved through effective partnerships between the VHLIVC and Industry Stakeholders. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  43. VET Service Providers - Domestic(7 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • It is through this partnership approach that VET can add real • value to development efforts within the CONSTRUCTION Industry. • The delivery of CONSTRUCTION Industry Training has a number of • unique features and the training environment for these • CONSTRUCTION Programs must attempt to match as closely as • possible the “real work environment” that students will face when • entering the industry. This can only be achieved through this • partnership approach. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  44. VET Service Providers - Domestic(8 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • Consequently,VABIS Hong Lam International Vocational • College(VHLIVC) has been in tight collaboration with Box Hill • Institute of Australia for the past three (3) years and is currently • working towards developing a close partnership with NMIT • Institute of Australia as well as Saskatchewan Institute Of Applied • Science & Technology (SIAST) of Canada to create a structure to • further develop the VHLIVC’s VET Centers. A comprehensive • assessment of the VHLIVC existing center was conducted to assess • their capital, operation, human, and academic needs. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  45. VET Service Providers - Domestic(9 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • A “Master Strategic Planning” document was prepared for the • VHLIVC. Research undertaken as part of the development of this • strategic plan has indicated that there is a distinct lack of partnership • between the key stakeholders in terms of how VET for the industry is • planned, managed and delivered. • As a consequence, VET of the CONSTRUCTION Industry in Vietnam • is not currently producing the quantity or quality of outputs to meet • the needs and demands of this fast growing industry. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  46. VET Service Providers - Domestic (10 of 16) • VABIS HONG LAM INTERNATIONAL VOCATIONAL COLLEGE • (continued) • In order to move forward in a structured manner, VHLIVCexisting • facility at the Tan Thanh-Phu My location is being restructured and • enhanced to be a “Model VET Center”, which in turn would • enable the specific measures in relation to the VHLIVC to be fully • implemented into one center of international standard. • This approach will lead to the development of a center of • excellence for Vocational Education and Training (VET) in • the CONSTRUCTION industry, which serves as a template for • replication in an additional future two (2) centers: Vung Tau and Ho • Chi Minh City. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  47. VET Service Providers - Domestic (11 of 16) • DOMESTIC VET PARTNERS • * Hanoi University of Technology. • * Pertro Vietnam Manpower Training College • College (PVMTC). • * Dong An Polytechnic. • * BaRiaVung Tau Vocational College. • * LILAMA Technical & Technology College 2 • (LILAMA 2). “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  48. VET Service Providers - Domestic (12 of 16) • DOMESTIC VET PARTNERS • * The British Council (Vietnam) • * Senior Experten Service (Germany) • * Lattitude Global Volunteering (UK) • * Anniesland College (Glasgow, UK) “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  49. VET Service Providers - Overseas (13 of 16) • INTERNATIONAL VET PARTNERS • 1. BOX HILL TAFE (Australia) • * Provision of the four (4) Australian Accredited Trade Programs to VHLIVC. • * Training of Teaching Staff to the Qualification of Certificate IV • Training & Assessment. • * On-going Moderation of Quality of Program Delivery. • * Issue of Trade Certificate III to Graduates of International • Employment Type. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010

  50. VET Service Providers - Overseas (14 of 16) • INTERNATIONAL VET PARTNERS (continued) • 2. NMIT TAFE (Australia) • * Northern Melbourne Institute of TAFE (NMIT) is a TAFE • institute located in the northern suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria, • Australia. It has six (6) city campuses located at Preston, • Collingwood, Epping, Fairfield, Greensborough, Heidelberg, a country • campus at Ararat, and country training facilities at Eden Park, Yan • Yean and Kyneton. • A wide selection of study options in vocational education are offered • from short courses, pre-apprenticeships, apprenticeships and • traineeships through to certificate, diploma, advanced diploma, and • bachelor degrees under the Australian Qualifications Framework. In • 2009 there were 1,103 teaching staff and 628 support staff employed • by NMIT who delivered over 500 courses. “Skilled Labour Export Initiative” Media Release Event, October 2010