when to not use commas n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
When to NOT use commas! PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
When to NOT use commas!

play fullscreen
1 / 14

When to NOT use commas!

73 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

When to NOT use commas!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. When to NOT use commas!

  2. But first….DOL • Tony used to win a lot of boxing matches until he hurts his hand and now he can’t be the most bestest fighter out their. (4 errors) • Ms. Hanks the nice co-teacher with Mr. Dorrell was standing by the back door. (2 errors)

  3. Do not use a single comma between the subject and verb of your sentence. • Incorrect: The professor of my Japanese class, gave a quiz yesterday. • Correct: The professor of my Japanese class gave a quiz yesterday. • Now you try…. • The other day I, pushed Mr. Dorrell down in the snow.

  4. Do not use a comma to separate the paired parts in paired compound subjects or compound verbs. • Incorrect: She lets me watch her mom, and pop fight. • Correct: She lets me watch her mom and pop fight. • Please fix this one….. • They would argue over money, and scream about his late nights.

  5. Do not use commas to separate a noun and its modifying adjectives when the adjectives come before the noun. • Incorrect: The bright red, car was a Corvette. • Correct: The bright red car was a Corvette. • Now you try….. • The strong, tough boy used to go to this school.

  6. How to Narrow a Research Topic

  7. When your research topic is too broad, ask yourself these questions: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How to Narrow a Research Topic

  8. Let’s see how this works with an example: eating disorders This topic is too broad (general) to write about in a short paper. We need to make it narrower (more specific). How to Narrow a Research Topic

  9. Who? TOPIC: EATING DISORDERS Populations Age NEW TOPIC: Eating disorders in elderly females Gender Race or Ethnicity How to Narrow a Research Topic

  10. What? TOPIC: EATING DISORDERS Types Anorexia NEW TOPIC: Anorexia in elderly females Bulimia Compulsive eating How to Narrow a Research Topic

  11. When? TOPIC: EATING DISORDERS Timeframes Current or historical view NEW TOPIC: Bulimia in middle-aged females Period of life How to Narrow a Research Topic

  12. Where? TOPIC: EATING DISORDERS Places States NEW TOPIC: Anorexia in Australian women Regions Countries How to Narrow a Research Topic

  13. Why? TOPIC: EATING DISORDERS Evaluate Causes NEW TOPIC: Successful methods for treatment of compulsive eating Treatments Outcomes How to Narrow a Research Topic

  14. Mix n’ Match • Combine any number of elements that you derive from asking these questions until you find an interesting topic to research. • Some examples: • Causes and treatment of anorexia in college athletes • Prevalence of bulimia in teen-age males in the United States • Changes in treatment for compulsive overeaters, 1950-present. How to Narrow a Research Topic