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Gary Hillyard, Ashfield School ‘Ireland in Schools’ NPS School of Education PowerPoint Presentation
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Gary Hillyard, Ashfield School ‘Ireland in Schools’ NPS School of Education

Gary Hillyard, Ashfield School ‘Ireland in Schools’ NPS School of Education

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Gary Hillyard, Ashfield School ‘Ireland in Schools’ NPS School of Education

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  1. Ireland 1801-1921Lessons 27-34The Easter Rising/Rise of Sinn Fein Partition/Michael Collins/ConclusionPowerPoint presentations OHTs Other visual sources used in various lessons Gary Hillyard, Ashfield School ‘Ireland in Schools’ NPS School of Education, U. Nottingham

  2. Menu Lesson 27 Why did the Easter Rising take place? Overview OHT: Reveal Lesson 28 What happened during the Easter Rising? OHT: Map of Dublin during the RisingPhotographs: Personalities & scenes Lesson 29 What was the impact of the Easter Rising? Overview Silent sentences OHT: Evaluation of sources Lesson 30 How did Sinn Fein develop into the major Irish Republican group after the Easter Rising? Overview OHT: General election results in Ireland, 1918 Lesson 31 Was the Government of Ireland Act a real achievement for the Irish? Overview OHT: De Valera - some questions Lesson 32 What were the results of the Anglo-Irish war? Overview OHT 1: Answers without questions OHT 2: Anglo-Irish Treaty, 1921 OHT 3: Arguments for & against the Treaty Lesson 33 How has History treated Michael Collins since 1922? Overview Michael Collins: Photograph, 1921; Poster for film Lesson 34 Why was Ireland partitioned in 1921-22? Overview OHT: Map – Ireland partitioned

  3. Aims To look at the causes and early planning of the Easter Rising. Why did the Easter Rising take place? Lesson 27

  4. What are these two men doing? Why are they here? Does this change your impression of what they are doing? Why are they here? Lesson 27

  5. So what has actually happened? Lesson 27

  6. Aims To learn about the key events of the Easter Rising. What happened during the Easter Rising? Lesson 28

  7. Aims • To learn about the key events of the Easter Rising. How as Yeats used emotion to put his point across? Why does he suggest the event took place and what was its impact? Lesson 28

  8. Lesson 28

  9. Aims To examine sources as pieces of evidence. To assess the impact of the Easter Rising. What was the impact of the Easter Rising? Lesson 29

  10. Aims • To examine sources as pieces of evidence. • To assess the impact of the Easter Rising. Silent Sentences The rebellion was condemned by the Catholic Church and the IPP. 15 of those involved were executed and became known as the ‘Easter Martyrs’. De Valera was imprisoned because he was an American citizen. Around 450 rebels and civilians were killed during the rebellion as were 116 British soldiers and policemen. Lesson 29

  11. Aims • To examine sources as pieces of evidence. • To assess the impact of the Easter Rising. Lesson 28

  12. Aims • To examine sources as pieces of evidence. • To assess the impact of the Easter Rising. Opinion Continuum Lesson 29

  13. Aims • To examine sources as pieces of evidence. • To assess the impact of the Easter Rising. Homework: Last two pages of the workbook – read through and complete. Lesson 29

  14. Aims To examine the key developments in Sinn Fein after 1916. How did Sinn Fein develop into the major Irish Republican group after the Easter Rising? Lesson 30

  15. General election results in Ireland, 1918 Lesson 30

  16. Aims • To examine the key developments in Sinn Fein after 1916. Task: Work your way through the four tasks on the workbook. Lesson 30

  17. Aims • To examine the key developments in Sinn Fein after 1916. Order of Importance Lesson 30

  18. Aims To examine the reasons behind the Government of Ireland Act. To assess its impact. Was the Government of Ireland Act a real achievement for the Irish? Lesson 31

  19. Where and when was de Valera born? What did he do in 1908? Which area did he command during the 1916 Easter Rising? Where was de Valera when he was elected for East Clare? What position did he hold when he returned to Ireland in 1920? Aims • To examine the reasons behind the Government of Ireland Act. • To assess its impact. Eamon de Valera Lesson 31

  20. Aims • To examine the reasons behind the Government of Ireland Act. • To assess its impact. Task: Using the textbook, pages, complete the worksheet on the Government of Ireland Act. Lesson 31

  21. Where and when was de Valera born? What did he do in 1908? Which area did he command during the 1916 Easter Rising? Where was de Valera when he was elected for East Clare? What position did he hold when he returned to Ireland in 1920? Eamon de Valera Lesson 31 - OHT

  22. Aims To examine the events of the Anglo-Irish War. To assess the impact of the Anglo-Irish War and the resulting treaty. What were the results of the Anglo-Irish War? Lesson 32

  23. Michael Collins 11 English civilians/British Intelligence Officers IRA If these are the answers, what are the questions? Lesson 32 – OHT 1

  24. Using the information in the workbooks, decide in your group what you think the Anglo-Irish Treaty should look like. Aims • To examine the events of the Anglo-Irish War. • To assess the impact of the Anglo-Irish War and the resulting treaty. Lesson 32

  25. Security and Defence Britain was to have 3 naval bases in Ireland. Ulster Would be able to opt out of the Treaty – so could end up being partitioned permanently. A Boundary Commission would be set up to examine the boundaries of Ulster and make recommendations. The powers of the new Irish state Southern Ireland would have dominion status – granted Ireland the same powers as Canada and other Dominions within the Empire. This was not independence. This meant full control of domestic affairs, membership of the Empire and the Irish would have to swear allegiance to the Crown. Oath of allegiance was watered down. Anglo-Irish Treaty 1921 Lesson 32 – OHT 2

  26. Now decide, based on the information provided, how you think Collins and De Valera would have reacted to the Treaty. Aims • To examine the events of the Anglo-Irish War. • To assess the impact of the Anglo-Irish War and the resulting treaty. Lesson 32

  27. Arguments for & against the Treaty Northern Ireland and Its Neighbours since 1920 by S. Gillespie & G. Jones, Hodder & Stoughton,, 034062034X, p. 23 We have got peace which is what the people want. We are able to set up our own government and rule ourselves. An oath of loyalty to the King has no meaning. This is a step towards independence. We will take other steps and become fully independent. We are not in a position to start another war with Britain. • You may have peace but where is the • Republic we have fought for from 1916? • Your powers are limited while you stay • in the Empire and have the King as head of state. • We swore an oath of loyalty to the Republic • and we will not swear an oath to the King. • Britain will continue to interfere in Ireland's • affairs unless you remove her power completely. • We will still have British troops • In our country. Lesson 32 – OHT 3

  28. Homework: Read pages 156-8 of the textbook and use them to help you fill out the table about the success of the Treaty. Aims • To examine the events of the Anglo-Irish War. • To assess the impact of the Anglo-Irish War and the resulting treaty. Lesson 32

  29. Aims To how film can be used as evidence. To assess how Collins has been treated by Historians since 1922. How has History treated Michael Collins since 1922? Lesson 33

  30. Aims • To how film can be used as evidence. • To assess how Collins has been treated by Historians since 1922. What words can be used to describe how Collins is portrayed in the film?

  31. Aims • To how film can be used as evidence. • To assess how Collins has been treated by Historians since 1922. How useful is the film in studying the character of Michael Collins?

  32. Michael Collins, 1921 Poster for film Michael Collins, Menu Lesson 33

  33. Aims To plan an essay. To use keywords relating to causation. Why was Ireland partitioned in 1922? Lesson 34

  34. ULSTER (Six counties - Northern Ireland) Stayed part of UK 66% Protestant 33% Catholic The Catholics felt cheated by the treaty. They wanted to be a part of a united Ireland. They felt abandoned in the new Ulster dominated by Protestants. From the start they felt no loyalty to the ‘Orange State’. 66% Protestant 33% Catholic • IRISH FREE STATE • (becoming the Republic of Ireland in 1949) • Given Home Rule, the right to have its own government and make its own decisions. • BUT…. • The Free State stayed in the British Empire. • Irish politicians had to swear an oath of loyalty to the King of Britain. • Ireland had to accept the loss of Ulster. 10% Protestant 90% Catholic Lesson 35

  35. Aims • To plan an essay. • To use keywords relating to causation. Individually, you are going to plan an answer to the following question: Why was Ireland partitioned in 1922?